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May 9, 2016

Political columnist apologises after mocking disabled broadcaster Andrew Marr

Political columnist apologises after mocking disabled broadcaster Andrew Marr

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Monday, May 9, 2016

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Quentin Letts photographed in 2009
Image: Steve Punter.

Quentin Letts, a political columnist and sketch writer has publicly apologized after he mocked disabled broadcaster Andrew Marr. Letts was reviewing former BBC business editor Robert Peston‘s new ITV television show for The Daily Mail when he made the comments. In his column he said that Marr, who suffered a stroke in 2013, was like “Captain-Hop-Along, growling away on BBC One, throwing his arm about like a tipsy conductor”.

Letts posted an apology on his Twitter page after a critical article by Roy Greenslade, which appeared in The Guardian. Greenslade said “I don’t want to come off all namby-pamby. I understand that no-one should be beyond criticism and that Letts was exercising his right to press freedom. But really Quentin, that was a graceless remark.”

The apology tweet read, “I fear my sketch reference to the admirable Marr today was horrid. Apologies to all concern and upset”. Letts also replied directly to Greenslade, who updated his article. Letts said “Perhaps I should have been more cautious but I hope that Andrew will forgive it. He has been equally teasing about himself in my company. I admire him”. He also added that he believes that Marr’s stroke had “made him more watchable than he was beforehand”.

Criticism also came from Marr’s wife and The Stroke Association. Eleven complaints were filed in relation to the comments to the Independent Press Standards Organisation according to a BBC statement.

Andrew Marr drew in 1.6 million viewers significantly more than Peston’s debut, with 166,000 viewers tuning in. Peston left the BBC to become ITV’s political editor in 2015.



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October 9, 2015

Calicut Review is conducting an English essay writing competition for the General public

Filed under: Disputed,India,Journalism,Magazines,Media,Review — admin @ 5:00 am

Calicut Review is conducting an English essay writing competition for the General public

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Friday, October 9, 2015

Kozhikode: Calicut Review conducts an essay writing competition in English for the public based on 15 contemporary topics listed in the website calicutreview.com/essays. Writers may send their articles based on any one of the selected topics to this address essays2015[at]calicutreview[dot]com before 30th October. The article should not be more than 10 pages. The awards will be distributed in a function to be held at Calicut on 30th November.

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August 28, 2015

Foreign journalists reporting restrictions revoked by Indonesian government

Foreign journalists reporting restrictions revoked by Indonesian government

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Friday, August 28, 2015

Indonesian Home Affairs Minister Tjahjo Kumolo, has revoked and apologized for the proposal of plans for more stringent regulations placed on foreign journalists due to public disgruntle. New regulations would require foreign journalists to provide reports to appropriate government authorities, and the National Intelligence Agency (BIN), detailing any work in Indonesia.

These new regulations were issued to the entire island on Wednesday in an attempt for the Foreign Ministry to administer and oversee all activity of journalists. Foreign journalists and television crews, activists and non-government organisations would have been among those affected by the new changes of policy.

The Alliance of Independent Journalists Indonesia (AJI) believed the new regulation violated the freedom of the press in Indonesia and went against the original principles of freedom of the press in Indonesia and West Papua.

“The policy contradicts the pledge that President Jokowi made when he was in Papua that he would allow open access to foreign journalists,” Sujarwono, AJI chairman, said.

The Jakarta Foreign Correspondents Club commented on the bid to change policies surrounding the freedom of press to be saddening as the Indonesian government claims to support freedom of speech and human rights, taking a democratic government stance.



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August 26, 2015

North Carolina reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

North Carolina reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

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Two members of a news crew for Roanoke, North Carolina news station WDBJ were shot and killed on live television Wednesday morning. The suspect, a former reporter for the news station, later shot himself after a manhunt that lasted several hours.

Reporter Alison Parker, 24, and cameraman Adam Ward, 27, were conducting an interview at a local outdoor shopping mall when a gunman opened fire at approximately 6:45 AM local time (1045 UTC). At least 15 shots were reported to have fired. Parker and Ward were killed, while the interviewee, Vicki Gardner, was transported to hospital and underwent surgery for her injuries, later being listed in stable condition.

The gunman, later identified to be 41 year-old Vester Lee Flanagan II, fled the scene afterwards. A brief police chase ensued several hours later when law enforcement attempted unsuccessfully to pull Flanagan over on Interstate 66 in Fauquier County. Shortly after that, Flanagan pulled off the road and shot himself. He was pronounced dead at a Fairfax-area hospital around 1:30 PM local time (1730 UTC).

Flanagan, who reported under the alias “Bryce Williams”, was fired by the station in 2013. According to WDBJ president and general manager Jeffrey Marks, Flanagan was “an unhappy man” and “difficult to work with”. “Eventually after many incidents of his anger coming to the fore, we dismissed him. He did not take that well.”

A video of the shooting, appeared to have been captured from the point of view of the shooter using a GoPro camera, was posted on Bryce Williams’ Twitter and Facebook pages several hours afterwards. Both pages were taken down within minutes of the video’s uploading.



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Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

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Two members of a news crew for Roanoke, Virginia station WDBJ were shot and killed on live television this morning. The suspect, a former reporter for the news station, later shot himself after a manhunt of several hours, authorities said.

Reporter Alison Parker, 24, and cameraman Adam Ward, 27, were conducting an interview at a local outdoor shopping mall when a gunman opened fire at approximately 6:45 AM local time (1045 UTC). Around fifteen shots were reported fired. Parker and Ward were killed, while the interviewee, Vicki Gardner, was transported to hospital and underwent surgery for her injuries, later listed in stable condition.

The gunman, later identified as 41 year-old Vester Lee Flanagan II, fled the scene. A brief police chase ensued several hours later when law enforcement attempted unsuccessfully to pull Flanagan over on Interstate 66 in Fauquier County. Shortly after, Flanagan pulled off the road and shot himself. He was pronounced dead at a Fairfax-area hospital around 1:30 PM local time (1730 UTC).

Flanagan, who reported under the alias “Bryce Williams”, was fired by the station in 2013. According to WDBJ president and general manager Jeffrey Marks, speaking to CBS News, Flanagan was “an unhappy man” and “difficult to work with”. “Eventually after many incidents of his anger coming to the fore, we dismissed him. He did not take that well”.

A video of the shooting, which appeared to have been captured from the point of view of the shooter, was posted on Bryce Williams’ Twitter and Facebook pages several hours afterwards.



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Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, alleged shooter commits suicide

Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, alleged shooter commits suicide

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

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Two members of a news crew for Roanoke, Virginia station WDBJ were shot and killed on live television this morning. The suspect, a former reporter for the news station, later shot himself after a manhunt of several hours, authorities said.

Reporter Alison Parker, 24, and cameraman Adam Ward, 27, were conducting an interview at a local outdoor shopping mall when a gunman opened fire at approximately 6:45 AM local time (1045 UTC). Around fifteen shots were reported fired. Parker and Ward were killed, while the interviewee, Vicki Gardner, was transported to hospital and underwent surgery for her injuries, later listed in stable condition.

The gunman, later identified as 41 year-old Vester Lee Flanagan II, fled the scene. A brief police chase ensued several hours later when law enforcement attempted unsuccessfully to pull Flanagan over on Interstate 66 in Fauquier County. Shortly after, Flanagan pulled off the road and shot himself. He was pronounced dead at a Fairfax-area hospital around 1:30 PM local time (1730 UTC).

Flanagan, who reported under the alias “Bryce Williams”, was fired by the station in 2013. According to WDBJ president and general manager Jeffrey Marks, speaking to CBS News, Flanagan was “an unhappy man” and “difficult to work with”. “Eventually after many incidents of his anger coming to the fore, we dismissed him. He did not take that well”.

A video of the shooting, which appeared to have been captured from the point of view of the shooter, was posted on Bryce Williams’ Twitter and Facebook pages several hours afterwards.



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May 22, 2015

David Letterman signs off after 33 year career on the Late Show

David Letterman signs off after 33 year career on the Late Show

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Friday, May 22, 2015

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David Letterman in 2011.
Image: Joint Chiefs of Staff.

American TV host David Letterman announced his retirement on Wednesday night, after a 33 year career as host of the Late Show on CBS. His farewell included an abundance of clips from his classic skits, a few restrained fillips of sincerity and humility and sarcastic, self-deprecating humor with a tinge of nostalgia.

Letterman chose as his last musical guests the Foo Fighters, as the band in the past had canceled their tour in South America to play on his first show after Letterman’s heart surgery operation.

Over the last few weeks, a parade of celebrity guests including Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts and George Clooney paid their respects to Mr. Letterman. Jason Alexander from Seinfeld tweeted: “David Letterman, thank you for the laughs, both live and on air. May your family bring you joy and inspiration and may you laugh for all your days.”

On Wednesday, he described all the encomiums as “over the top” and said he found it “flattering, embarrassing and gratifying”. After more than an hour of tributes and laughs, David Letterman signed off his last show yesterday night with the words: “That’s pretty much all I got … thank you and goodnight.”



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February 19, 2015

Senior Telegraph writer Peter Oborne alleges paper suppressed reports on HSBC

Filed under: Archived,Banking,Europe,HSBC,Journalism,Media,United Kingdom — admin @ 5:00 am

Senior Telegraph writer Peter Oborne alleges paper suppressed reports on HSBC

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Thursday, February 19, 2015

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Peter Oborne, former chief political commentator at British broadsheet newspaper the Daily Telegraph, has alleged the paper suppressed and under-reported stories involving banking giant HSBC so as to avoid a loss of advertising revenue. In a public resignation from the paper published on the openDemocracy website on Tuesday, the veteran journalist and columnist alleges the division between advertising and editorial had not been kept watertight and that editors were committing a form of “fraud” on readers of the newspaper.

In Oborne’s article, he details how he submitted a story to the Telegraph regarding HSBC closing a number of prominent British Muslims‘s accounts — despite assurances to the contrary, the story was not published by the paper. This led to Oborne investigating other coverage of HSBC in the newspaper. He cites the example of a story written by the Telegraph banking correspondent Harry Wilson on problems with HSBC’s accounts, which Oborne claims was quietly removed from the Telegraph website. Oborne says the failure of the Telegraph to cover HSBC is also present in the relative coverage given in November 2014 after the bank had to allocate a fund of £1 billion to compensate customers, as well as an investigation into manipulation of the currency market: Oborne argues these developments were given considerable coverage in competing newspapers including the Guardian, Times, and Mail but the Telegraph covered them only briefly several pages into the business section.

Oborne’s article alleges a number of other examples of suppression — calling the coverage of pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong “bizarre”, and noting that the paper under-reported news of false accounting at Tesco but gave significant prominence to stories about the company without a critical edge.

Following Oborne’s article, a spokesman for the Telegraph responded: “Like any other business, we never comment on individual commercial relationships, but our policy is absolutely clear. We aim to provide all our commercial partners with a range of advertising solutions, but the distinction between advertising and our award-winning editorial operation has always been fundamental to our business. We utterly refute any allegation to the contrary. It is a matter of huge regret that Peter Oborne, for nearly five years a contributor to the Telegraph, should have launched such an astonishing and unfounded attack, full of inaccuracy and innuendo, on his own paper.”

Media commentator Roy Greenslade, writing for the Guardian, described Oborne’s allegations against the Telegraph as “dynamite” and said they go “to the heart of a paper’s credibility”. The Barclay brothers, owners of the Telegraph, “are being held to account”, according to Greenslade, and Oborne “has shone a light on a dark reality”.



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June 23, 2014

Egyptian court sends three Al-Jazeera journalists to jail

Egyptian court sends three Al-Jazeera journalists to jail

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Monday, June 23, 2014

Peter Greste, one of the journalists convicted, collecting a Peabody Award in 2012.
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Three journalists from the Qatar-based Al-Jazeera television news network have been sentenced to seven years in jail by a court in Cairo today for spreading false news and helping the Muslim Brotherhood group which are now banned as terrorists. The three journalists — the Australian correspondent Peter Greste, Canadian-Egyptian journalist and Cairo bureau chief for Al-Jazeera Mohamed Fahmy, and Baher Mohamed, an Egyptian producer— were convicted alongside others tried in absentia.

Baher Mohamed was sentenced to three years on a second charge for possessing weapons.

Al Antsey, the managing director for Al Jazeera English said of the judgment: “Today three colleagues and friends were sentenced, and will continue behind bars for doing a brilliant job of being great journalists. ‘Guilty’ of covering stories with great skill and integrity. ‘Guilty’ of defending people’s right to know what is going on in their world.”

“Peter, Mohamed, and Baher and six of our other colleagues were sentenced despite the fact that not a shred of evidence was found to support the extraordinary and false charges against them. At no point during the long drawn out ‘trial’ did the absurd allegations stand up to scrutiny. There were many moments during the hearings where in any other court of law, the trial would be thrown out. There were numerous irregularities in addition to the lack of evidence to stand up the ill-conceived allegations.”

Julie Bishop, the Australian Foreign Minister, said she was “bitterly disappointed” by the decision.



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Spelling error appears on Medill School of Journalism diplomas

Spelling error appears on Medill School of Journalism diplomas

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Monday, June 23, 2014

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On Saturday, Northwestern University‘s Medill School of Journalism in Chicago issued diplomas which misspelled the word integrated in “Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications”. Around 30 diplomas out of 250 distributed contained the spelling error, “itegrated”.

Medill School of Journalism logo.

In an e-mail quoted by Chicago Tribune, department lecturer Desiree Hanford said, “The diplomas are issued by the university, so we will work with the [university] registrar’s office Monday to provide new diplomas to these students”.

Inside Higher Ed said some alumni had objected to the program’s name change several years ago, and found the current situation amusing given their opposition to including integrated in the program’s name.

The journalism program has a grading policy called the “Medill F”, where assignments that contain an error such as having a spelling error result in the assignment being failed. Graduating student Kit Fox, according to the Chicago Tribune, said of the Medill F, “When as a freshman you hear about it for the first time, it sounds extremely harsh. It sounds almost unfair…And then you look at the stakes of what journalism is, and you realize it’s much more forgiving than what happens in the real world.” He also told FOX 32 News, “Maybe it was just one last edit test for us grads, or just some fantastic irony”.



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