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August 20, 2013

Pakistani Prime Minister agrees to put all state executions on hold

Pakistani Prime Minister agrees to put all state executions on hold

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Tuesday, August 20, 2013

File photo of Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in 1998.
Image: R. D. Ward.

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif put all state executions on hold on Sunday, having been urged to do so by President Asif Ali Zardari.

“In due deference to the wish of the president, it has been desired that all executions of death sentences may be held in abeyance till the discussion takes place,” a statement from the government said.

Information Minister Pervaiz Rasheed on Sunday said Sharif and Zardari will meet when the President returns to Pakistan from a trip, to discuss state execution in Pakistan. More than 8000 Pakistani prisoners are on death row according to Amnesty International.

Zardari and Sharif differ in their position on capital punishment. President Zardari banned state executions in Pakistan in 2008, a policy Prime Minister Sharif reversed in June this year, when his government came into office. Sharif had planned to re-introduce executions by the end of this month.

Although Zardari as President put a temporary hold on state executions, he will step down from office in September this year. Mamnoon Hussain is to take his place as President of Pakistan, a firm supporter of Prime Minister Sharif.

The stay on state executions may conflict with the scheduled hangings of two Islamist extremists, Attaullah and Muhammad Azam, who were originally to be hung between August 20 and 22. The men are members of Sunni militant group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, and were found guilty in 2004 of the 2001 murder of a Shia doctor named Ali Raza Peerani.



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June 29, 2012

Raja Pervaiz Ashraf faces new challenges in first week of premiership

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Pakistan
Other stories from Pakistan
  • 23 May 2012: Twitter restored in Pakistan after block over Muhammad images
  • 17 April 2012: Supreme Court of Pakistan criticizes authorities over Bhutto murder
  • 17 April 2012: Taliban raids Pakistan prison, 384 escape
  • 9 March 2012: Michelle Obama, Hillary Clinton present 2012 International Women of Courage Awards
  • 16 January 2012: Dozens killed, injured after blast hits Shias in Punjab, Pakistan
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Friday, June 29, 2012

Raja Pervaiz Ashraf, the recently-appointed Prime Minister of Pakistan, chaired his first cabinet meeting as premier Tuesday, using it to discuss ongoing power supply problems. The new PM is also coming under pressure from the Supreme Court to reopen a corruption probe into the President.

During the meeting, Ashraf directed the Ministry of Water and Power to recover outstanding dues pertaining to WAPDA from all federal and provincial government departments. He assured the cabinet that the current power cuts being enforced in the country would be taken to a manageable level within a time span of three months.

Following the disqualification of Yousaf Raza Gillani from premiership by the Supreme Court of Pakistan over a contempt of court conviction, Ashraf was appointed as the new Prime Minister of Pakistan in a National Assembly session. Gillani had been discharged from office for failing to open investigations over fraud and corruption charges associated with President Asif Ali Zardari.

Wednesday, just days into his first week in office, the Supreme Court has asked Ashraf to reopen corruption cases against President Zardari, a request which was previously placed upon Ashraf’s predecessor Gillani. The court has requested Ashraf’s response by July 12. The three-judge bench said it expected Ashraf would comply. However, Ashraf had earlier maintained the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) had decided not to open the cases and commented that his stance on the issue was the same as Gillani’s. According to the PPP, the judiciary has not acted impartially in the matter.

Raja Pervez Ashraf was born in 1950 in the town of Sanghar in Sindh, where he was brought up. He graduated from the University of Sindh and was involved in agriculture before entering the field of politics. He is originally from Gujar Khan, a small town located in Rawalpindi district in northern Punjab province. Ashraf enjoys the reputation of being regarded as a senior politician of the PPP in the Rawalpindi region.

Prior to being elected as Prime Minister, Ashraf was the federal minister for Water and Power. His term in office oversaw a collapse and inefficiency in the country’s electricity supplies, for which he has been criticized. He has earned the nickname “Raja Rental” due to allegations of his involvement in receiving kickbacks from private rental power plants.

In his first address to the parliament as Prime Minister, Ashraf said “We are standing at a critical juncture. We can either move forward or lapse backward.” Within 24 hours of being elected into office, Ashraf convened a meeting to resolve and discuss the ongoing energy crisis in the country and directed the Ministry of Petroleum to ensure the supply of 28,000 tonnes of fuel daily to power plants, so as to add 1200 mega watts to the national grid system.



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June 23, 2012

Raja Pervaiz Ashraf appointed as new Prime Minister of Pakistan

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Pakistan
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  • 23 May 2012: Twitter restored in Pakistan after block over Muhammad images
  • 17 April 2012: Supreme Court of Pakistan criticizes authorities over Bhutto murder
  • 17 April 2012: Taliban raids Pakistan prison, 384 escape
  • 9 March 2012: Michelle Obama, Hillary Clinton present 2012 International Women of Courage Awards
  • 16 January 2012: Dozens killed, injured after blast hits Shias in Punjab, Pakistan
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Saturday, June 23, 2012

Following the disqualification of Yousaf Raza Gillani from premiership by the Supreme Court of Pakistan over a contempt of court conviction, Raja Pervaiz Ashraf has been appointed as the new Prime Minister of Pakistan. Gillani has been discharged from office for failing to open investigations over fraud and corruption charges associated with President Asif Ali Zardari.

Raja Pervez Ashraf was born in 1950 in the town of Sanghar in Sindh, where was brought up. He graduated from the University of Sindh and was involved in agriculture before entering the field of politics. He is originally from Gujar Khan, a small town located in Rawalpindi district in northern Punjab province. Ashraf enjoys the reputation of being regarded as a senior politician of the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) in the Rawalpindi region.

Prior to being elected as Prime Minister, Ashraf was the federal minister for Water and Power Development. His term in office oversaw a collapse and inefficiency in the country’s electricity supplies, for which he has been criticized. He has earned the nickname “Raja Rental” due to allegations of his involvement in receiving kickbacks from private rental power plants. Ashraf won enough votes in the National Assembly of Pakistan to become eligible for the office of premiership. It has been predicted that following his appointment, Ashraf will have to face the same challenges by the judiciary which his predecessor faced, namely to pursue corruption cases against the President. However, many political commentators have expressed skepticism that Ashraf, a staunch PPP loyalist, would open cases against Zardari.

In his first televised address to the parliament as Prime Minister, Ashraf said “We are standing at a critical juncture. We can either move forward or lapse backward.” Within 24 hours of being elected into office, Ashraf convened a meeting to resolve and discuss the ongoing energy crisis in the country and directed the Ministry of Petroleum to ensure the supply of 28,000 tonnes of fuel daily to power plants, so as to add 1200 mega watts to the national grid system. He chaired the first cabinet meeting on 26 June 2012, in which he directed the Ministry of Water and Power to “recover outstanding dues of WAPDA from all federal and provincial government departments.” He assured the cabinet that the current power cuts being enforced would be taken to a manageable level within three months.

On 27 June, just days into his first week in office, the Supreme Court of Pakistan asked Ashraf to reopen cases against President Zardari, as predicted. The court has asked Ashraf to respond by 12 July. A three judge bench said it expected the new premier would act on the directives given by the court. However, Ashraf maintained shortly afterwards that the PPP had decided not to open the cases and commented that his stance on the issue was no different to that of Gillani previously. The PPP has said that the judiciary has not acted impartial into the cases.



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May 5, 2011

U.S. did not inform Pakistan of bin Laden mission because of suspicions he was being harbored by government

U.S. did not inform Pakistan of bin Laden mission because of suspicions he was being harbored by government

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Thursday, May 5, 2011

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The president of Pakistan, Asif Ali Zardari, attacked “baseless speculation” that Pakistan was harboring bin Laden.

The U.S. did not inform Pakistan of the operation to kill Osama bin Laden because of fears they were harboring the leader of al-Qaeda and would warn him of the mission, a senior American intelligence official has said. Pakistan has defended itself against allegations it was protecting the world’s most wanted man, and expressed embarrassment after it emerged bin Laden may have been living in the compound in Abbottabad for as many as six years without being intercepted by Pakistan intelligence.

Leon Panetta, the director of the CIA, said cooperation between the two countries “could jeopardise the mission” because there were suspicions that elements of the Pakistani government were working with bin Laden. Panetta disclosed U.S. officials had dismissed working with the government of Pakistan early on in the planning of the mission to kill him because of fears that they might “alert” the man named responsible for the September 11 attacks. The revelation will likely raise questions over the level of trust between officials in Washington, D.C. and Islamabad.

‘Deep concerns’

The president of Pakistan, Asif Ali Zardari, has attacked “baseless speculation” that Pakistan was harboring bin Laden. The Pakistani foreign ministry also said in a statement that it has “deep concerns and reservations” over the U.S. fears it is sheltering terrorists, and stressed it shared information openly with Washington. But U.S. officials have raised concerns over how Pakistani authorities allowed bin Laden to remain undetected in the country for as many as six years, and tensions are likely to be further strained after the White House announced it would be throughly investigating claims bin Laden had “benefactors” and a “support system” inside Pakistan. John Brennan, a senior counterterrorism official, said: “We are looking right now at how he was able to hold out there for so long.”

Denying they were providing a shelter for bin Laden, Pakistani officials expressed “embarrassment” over failing to detect his presence so close to the capital; they said a full investigation would be launched. “We will inquire into the causes of what happened but it’s really important not to turn it into any allegation of complicity,” the Pakistani ambassador to Washington, Husain Haqqani, said. But Western politicians have expressed skepticism as to how the Pakistani government did not know bin Laden was in the country, despite him living a short distance from the leading elite military training academy. U.S. Senator Lindsey Graham asked: “How could he be in such a compound without being noticed?”

File image of a team of U.S. Navy Seals, the elite unit which carried out the raid on the compound in Pakistan.

Daughter: Osama captured then shot

It emerged yesterday that bin Laden’s daughter had told Pakistani officials that her father had initially been captured by the U.S. forces and then killed. The White House said on Tuesday that bin Laden had been unarmed during the raid, but the U.S. Navy Seals did meet resistance from other people in the building; it is thought as many as 18 people may have been in the compound. The U.S. left several people behind, including six children; afterwards, Pakistani authorities arrested everyone in the compound.

“If he had surrendered, attempted to surrender, I think we should obviously have accepted that, but there was no indication that he wanted to do that and therefore his killing was appropriate,” U.S. attorney general Eric Holder said yesterday. But the claim by bin Laden’s 12-year-old daughter that U.S. forces captured him and then shot him dead in front of his family appear to contradict this statement. The U.S. has also been forced to defend itself against allegations that the raid was unlawful, and claims that bin Laden was not a legitimate target. Holder told a Senate committee the killing of the al-Qaeda leader was “an act of national self-defence”.

More details have been emerging about how Bin Laden was killed in a raid by U.S. special forces on a compound not far from Islamabad over the weekend. The U.S. seized computer equipment and mobile telephones from the compound, which will be analysed with the hope they will reveal more information about the workings of al-Qaeda. U.S. president Barack Obama announced the raid on Sunday night. “I can report to the American people and to the world, that the U.S. has conducted an operation that killed Osama bin Laden,” Obama said, and confirmed he had been told in August of a lead to the location of the al-Qaeda leader. Four other people were killed in the raid on the compound; the U.S. sustained no casualties. The body of bin Laden was buried at sea.

U.S. will not release corpse images

Cquote1.svg Osama bin Laden is not a trophy—he is dead and let’s now focus on continuing the fight until al-Qaeda has been eliminated. Cquote2.svg

—Barack Obama

Last night Obama officially decided the U.S. will not release images of bin Laden’s corpse, which have been described as “very gruesome”. In an interview to be aired on CBS News, Obama will say: “The risks of release outweigh the benefits.” Skeptics have demanded the U.S. release the photographs of the corpse, and officials in the White House have been debating whether to do so for the past several days. But Obama is to add that conspiracy theorists “will just claim the photos are doctored anyway,” and say his decision was partly based on fears that there could be anger in the Middle East if the images were released. “Osama bin Laden is not a trophy—he is dead and let’s now focus on continuing the fight until al-Qaeda has been eliminated.” The images are reported to show bin Laden shot above the left eye, with parts of his brain exposed.

After it was announced on Sunday night that bin Laden had been killed, many Americans begun gathering in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., Times Square and Ground Zero—the site of the World Trade Center—in New York, to celebrate, singing the national anthem. Reports have indicated the U.S. government is awaiting the release of a “martyr tape”—an audio recording made by bin Laden to be broadcast after his death. Many world leaders have said the killing of bin Laden marks a major turning point on the war on terror. “Osama bin Laden suggested that he was operating in the name of Islam, but in reality he makes a mockery of the fundamental values of his own and every other religion,” Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, said. But NATO said it would continue the war in Afghanistan to ensure the country “never again becomes a safe haven for extremism, but develops in peace and security.”

The White House also confirmed they expect al-Qaeda may launch a retaliatory attack after bin Laden’s death. “We have anticipated a backlash, a desire, if not the ability, to exact some sort of revenge,” a spokesperson said. Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan has threatened to launch attacks in Pakistan and the U.S. in revenge for the death of bin Laden. Panetta said: “Though bin Laden is dead, al-Qaeda is not. The terrorists almost certainly will attempt to avenge him, and we must—and will—remain vigilant and resolute.” The U.S. has issued notices advising travelers to avoid large crowds in foreign countries.



Related news

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  • “Pakistani Taliban threaten revenge attack after bin Laden death; CIA says retaliation is likely” — Wikinews, May 3, 2011
  • “Osama bin Laden dead, report U.S. officials” — Wikinews, May 2, 2011

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February 13, 2011

Pakistani court seeks Musharraf\’s arrest over Bhutto murder

Pakistani court seeks Musharraf’s arrest over Bhutto murder

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Sunday, February 13, 2011

Musharraf from his time in power, before the attack

A court in Pakistan has issued an arrest warrant for exiled former President Pervez Musharraf. He is accused of involvement in the 2007 assassination of rival and ex-Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto while in power.

Currently in Dubai and residing in London, UK, Musharraf has been given until February 19 to appear before Rawalpindi’s anti-terror court. If he does not, the court says it will declare him a wanted fugitive and the government has suggested Interpol could be called upon to assist with extradition.

Bhutto served from 1988–1990 and 1993–1996 as Prime Minister. In December 2007 her election motorcade was attacked using guns and a suicide bomb, killing her. Last year two senior policemen were arrested on allegations they provided insufficient protection; prosecutors say the duo claimed they removed security from Bhutto’s motorcade just before it set off from a speaking engagement in Rawalpindi on Musharraf’s orders. The attack came soon after.

Her party, the Pakistan People’s Party, won a majority in the subsequent election and her widower, Asif Ali Zardari, is the current President. In 2008, Musharraf resigned under threat of impeachment. He had seized power from elected Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in 1999 after a coup from his role as army chief. Growing dissatisfaction over both foreign and domestic policy led to demonstrations until he called the elections.

The ex-President’s lawyer Mohammad Saif refuted the allegations. “This is just a drama. It is all politics,” he said, adding Musharraf was innocent and would not be appearing in court. The former dictator has not commented publically but denied involvement.

Cquote1.svg This is just a drama. It is all politics Cquote2.svg

—Musharraf’s lawyer

He has not been indicted and the court says Musharraf has the chance to defend himself as it conducts preliminary hearings on the claims. His position is that the accusations are a smear campaign led by Zardari. He blamed the Pakistani Taliban for the attack at the time; they deny involvement but lead prosecutor Zulfikar Chaudhry said the Taliban was the source of information showing Musharraf was “completely involved.”

“A joint investigation team, in its report to the court, has found Musharraf guilty of being involved in the conspiracy,” said Chaudhry, who is seeking a murder trial. No extradition treaty exists with Britain, but authorities there do decide on case-by-case requests.

Prosecutors contend he was fully aware of the plot in advance. They claim a questionaire was sent to his London home and multiple attempts were made to get in touch, to no avail. Now, investigators say, no further progress can be made without Musharraf.



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August 7, 2010

Pakistani President met with protest on fifth day of UK tour

Pakistani President met with protest on fifth day of UK tour

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Saturday, August 7, 2010

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Demonstrators braved pelting rain to wave flags, and raise banners and placards in protest against the President’s tour.
Image: FireLyte-spyre.

The president of Pakistan, Asif Ali Zardari, was met with a 250-strong protest today, during his visit to Birmingham, England. The protest was held outside the International Convention Centre (ICC) venue in the British city, where the president addressed supporters of his Pakistan Peoples Party and leading figures of the Pakistani community. Al Jazeera reported that two shoes were thrown at Zardari as he delivered his address, by a man who reportedly managed to break through police barriers to make a personal protest against the President.

Pakistan is experiencing the worst flooding in eighty years and it has been reported that the floods have now hit 14 million people. The president has faced criticism for continuing his tour during the crisis and though the messages of the protesters were many and varied, shown by placards ranging from “Save Pakistan from American terror and Zardari” to “Stop killing innocent Christians, repeal blasphemy law 295 B and 295 A”, Al Jazeera’s Alan Fisher said “[the] one thing they all agree on is that he should not be here.”

Inside the ICC, speaking to a group of supporters, Mr Zardari said the trip had been crucial in raising more than £20 million in aid from Britain and France and for resolving the diplomatic rift between Pakistan and Britain, caused by British Prime Minister David Cameron’s comments about alleged Pakistani terror links. David Cameron said on July 28 that “we cannot tolerate in any sense the idea that this country is allowed to look both ways and…promote the export of terror”. The Pakistani President has said that his European tour is essential to mend the diplomatic rift these comments have caused.

The President’s son has also defended the tour, saying “He’s doing the best he can and what he thinks is best to help the people of Pakistan.” He added that “his personal presence in Pakistan would not be able to raise this much money.”

The Financial Times said the President “struggled at times to be heard above the chanting of hundreds of supporters.” The chanting from the protesters arrayed outside the ICC could also be heard from where the President gave his speech. Many were calling for the Prime Minister’s resignation.

According to the Associated Press of Pakistan the President’s trip has been kept as cheap as possible, with Mr Zardari staying in the “cheapest five-star hotel in Central London” while he met with Mr Cameron. But at today’s protest many held placards decrying the fact that while money was urgently needed in Pakistan the President was taking a tour that would cost the country. Two examples of such placards were: “Thousands dying president is holidaying” and “while Pakistan floods Zadradi enjoys”.

A protester holds a sign reading: “We Reject Mushrraf Policy on Kashmir” and “We Demand Pakistan National Stand on Kashmir.” On the left can be seen the ICC, where the President gave his address.
Image: FireLyte-spyre.

The demonstration was held in the shadow of the Hyatt Regency Hotel where Mr Zardari has been staying. It is one of the most expensive hotels in Birmingham but the raised bridge that links directly to the ICC does provide the best security for the President.

Mohammed Khalil, a local official from the Tehreek-e-Insaf party, told the AFP that “He should be there organising for his own people. Instead he’s here with so many people. The government is paying all the expense for that. That money should be spent on the people of Pakistan, not on himself.” However the President’s son said millions had been raised from Britain and France because of the tour, and that the President would return once worldwide attention had died down.

The protest itself carried on for many hours, from before 2:00 in the afternoon until 4:25, when it ended with a prayer ceremony. The protest reflected the prominence of the Islamic faith in Pakistani culture, with a tarpaulin stretched on the ground to allow for Muslim prayer. National feeling was strong, shown by the numerous Pakistani flags being flown, and the presence of the closing religious ceremony and Islamic prayer mirrors the close-knit relationship nationalist and religious feeling have in Pakistan.



Related news

  • “Spreading floods in Pakistan worsen, at least 1600 dead” — Wikinews, August 6, 2010

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June 13, 2010

Pakistan\’s intelligence agency said to support Taliban

Pakistan’s intelligence agency said to support Taliban

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Sunday, June 13, 2010

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A report from the London School of Economics claims that the intelligence agency of Pakistan, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), has close ties to the Taliban in Afghanistan.

According to the report, the ISI actively provides the Taliban with services such as funding, weapons, and the training of troops. Additionally, the report, which is based on interviews with members of the Taliban, says that numerous ISI officials are part of the Taliban’s council of war, the Quetta Shura, although some Taliban commanders say that all Quetta Shura members have ties to the ISI. A senior Taliban official said that “[i]t is impossible to be a member of the Quetta shura without membership of the ISI.”

Taliban commanders said that the ISI has specifically provided support to or encouraged strategies such as attacking specific NATO military installations or infrastructure essential to NATO operations such as roads or bridges and assassinating specific individuals, such as high-ranking tribal officials or civilians such as doctors or teachers. The ISI is also alleged to have been the impetus behind the introduction of a type of explosive called a “plastic bomb,” which is undetectable with current NATO detection equipment.

The report said that “[a]s the provider of sanctuary and substantial financial, military and logistical support to the insurgency, the ISI appears to have strong strategic and operational influence—reinforced by coercion. There is thus a strong case that the ISI orchestrates, sustains and shapes the overall insurgent campaign.”

The Pakistani government has denied the claims in the report; a spokesperson said that “[t]he allegations are absolutely baseless.” Another official, referring to an alleged meeting of Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari with imprisoned Taliban commanders, said that “[t]here’s no such thing as President Zardari meeting Taliban leaders. This never happened.”



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November 7, 2009

Pakistan: Twelve militants killed in recent fighting

Pakistan: Twelve militants killed in recent fighting

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Saturday, November 7, 2009

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North and South Waziristan (2006)
Image: Bejnar.

Pakistan’s military has said that its soldiers killed twelve militants in recent operations targeting Taliban insurgents in South Waziristan.

The military said security forces battled militants on Friday as they fought for control of Makeen, an area considered the main base of the Pakistani Taliban.

The military statement also says troops battled to tighten their control over Sararogha, which is another Taliban stronghold. Five Pakistani soldiers were wounded in the operations.

“The fight against militancy […] is a long and tough battle as we have to not only fight the extremists but also the extremist mindset. The adversary in this battle should not be underestimated,” Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari said on Friday.

The accounts of the Pakistan army’s offensive in the tribal region near the Afghan border are difficult to verify, as journalists and aid workers are not allowed into the battle zone.

Pakistan launched an offensive against the Taliban last month in South Waziristan, an area that is believed to be a stronghold for rebels, and where the government does not have much influence. According to the Pakistani army, hundreds of militants were killed since the operation was launched, but the Taliban denies the claims.



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August 10, 2009

Al-Jazeera poll shows many Pakistanis identify America as \’biggest\’ threat

Al-Jazeera poll shows many Pakistanis identify America as ‘biggest’ threat

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Monday, August 10, 2009

Pakistan
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  • 18 February 2015: Pakistan releases 173 Indian prisoners at Wagah border
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A poll commissioned by the news network Al Jazeera in Pakistan has concluded that a majority of Pakistanis believe that Pakistan’s largest military aid donor, the United States, is the “biggest” threat to the country today.

The polling was conducted by Gallup Pakistan, an affiliate of Gallup International. Of the more than 2,600 Pakistanis polled 11% believed Taliban fighters to be the biggest threat, another 18% believed neighboring India to be the biggest threat to Pakistan. However, 59% (1,534) of the 2,600 Pakistanis polled believed that the United States is the biggest threat to Pakistan today.

A probable cause of resentment of the United States in Pakistan are the drone attacks, which are opposed by 66% of those polled, according to Al Jazeera. Drone attacks killed four civilians in Southern Afghanistan near the Afghanistan-Pakistan border on Wednesday, August, 5. In October, 2006, a drone attack hit a school in South Waziristan killing 80 people causing unrest in Pakistan.

Other results of the poll showed that 67% of Pakistanis polled, oppose U.S military intervention on Pakistan soil. Another 41% support negotiations with the Taliban.

The poll also revealed that some are dissatisfied with the current government of Pakistan, showing only 11% support for the current president, Asif Ali Zardari.

A sample size of 2662 people (52% men and 48% women) across all four Pakistani provinces was utilized for face-to-face questioning. The poll was conducted on July 26 and 27, 2009 and is considered accurate to the 95% confidence level with a margin of error of +/- 2-3%.



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May 16, 2009

France pledges twelve million Euro in aid to Pakistan

France pledges twelve million Euro in aid to Pakistan

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Saturday, May 16, 2009

French president Nicolas Sarkozy

In a meeting with Pakistani president Asif Ali Zardari in Paris on Friday, French president Nicolas Sarkozy pledged to give twelve million Euro (US$16.2 million) in humanitarian aid to Pakistan.

The funds will be given to more than one million internally displaced persons (IPD) in Pakistan who have been forced to flee from their homes following heavy violence between Taliban militants and the Pakistani army in Pakistan’s North West Frontier Province.

“We’ve come to an understanding for a larger cooperation for the strengthening of Pakistan, strengthening of the war […] the war going on in this region,” President Zardari said.

Zardari stressed that Pakistan and its neighbours needed to cooperate against the Taliban and other terrorist threats, saying that, “it is a war against a mindset and there is no time limit for the offensive”.



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