Wiki Actu en

September 8, 2012

Human Rights Watch publish documents alleging US cooperated with Libya on torture

Human Rights Watch publish documents alleging US cooperated with Libya on torture

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Libya
Other stories from Libya
  • 16 February 2015: Islamic State execute 21 Coptic Christians held in Libya
  • 15 September 2014: Libya accuse Qatar of intervening on side of rebels
  • 7 September 2014: Libya accuse Sudan of arming ‘terrorist group’
  • 28 August 2014: US says Egypt and UAE responsible for air attacks on Tripoli
  • 24 August 2014: Renegade General’s forces claim responsibility for aerial attacks on Tripoli
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

The nurse office inside the Parwan Detention Facility, Bagram Airbase in 2009
Image: Officer.

The human rights group Human Rights Watch has published a 154-page document accusing the United States of cooperating with Libya under the rule of Muammar Gaddafi, in the interrogation and torture of members of the armed group, Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), according to a report in the Huffington Post.

The report alleges that the United States and Libya, together with governments from Africa, Asia, and Europe such as the United Kingdom, collaborated in detaining former members of LIFG living outside Libya then deporting them back to Libya where they were allegedly tortured. According to the report, some of those detained where abused even before the were returned to Libya such as those held in United States military bases in Afghanistan. News reports have revealed that the abuse may have occurred between April 2003 and April 2005.

Upon the release of the document, Human Rights Watch has stated that their key source of information came from a pile of abandoned documents found on September 3, 2011 from the offices of former Libyan intelligence chief Musa Kusa. They also said that they have interviewed 14 former detainees who allege that they were subjected to abuses ranging from waterboarding, sexual assault, stress positions, beatings, and sleep deprivation.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Human Rights Watch publishes documents that alleges the United States cooperated with Libya regarding torture

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Libya
Other stories from Libya
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

The nurse office inside the Parwan Detention Facility, Bagram Airbase in 2009
Image: Officer.

The human rights group, Human Rights Watch has published a 154-page document accusing the United States of cooperating with Libya under the rule of Muammar Gaddafi, in the interrogation and torture of members of the armed group, Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), according to a report in the Huffington Post.

The report alleges that the United States and Libya, together with governments from Africa, Asia, and Europe such as the United Kingdom, collaborated in detaining former members of LIFG living outside Libya then deporting them back to Libya where they were allegedly tortured. According to the report, some of those detained where abused even before the were returned to Libya such as those held in United States military bases in Afghanistan. News reports have revealed that the abuse may have occurred between April 2003 and April 2005.

Upon the release of the document, Human Rights Watch has stated that their key source of information came from a pile of abandoned documents found on September 3, 2011 from the offices of former Libyan intelligence chief Musa Kusa. They also said that they have interviewed 14 former detainees who allege that they were subjected to abuses ranging from waterboarding, sexual assault, stress positions, beatings, and sleep deprivation.

Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 5, 2012

Libyan court jails 24 foreigners for helping Gaddafi

Libyan court jails 24 foreigners for helping Gaddafi

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Libya
Other stories from Libya
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

A court in Libya has sent 24 foreigners, mostly Ukrainians, to prison for supporting late leader Colonel Muamar al-Gaddafi’s regime by working on anti-aircraft missiles. The convicts say they are oil workers who were forced into the conflict which toppled Gaddafi.

A NATO B-2 bomber returns from an attack on Libya during last year’s uprising.

A Russian deemed to be the ringleader received a life sentence, while a second Russian, nineteen Ukranians, and three Belarussians were all given ten years’ hard labour. Belarussian ambassador Anatoly Stepus attended yesterday’s hearing and expressed surprise at “the worst kind of sentence. We thought that even if they were sentenced it would not be so strict. They have suffered a lot.”

The Ukrainian ambassador, Mykola Nahornyi, called the decision “inconsistent with the laws of the countries of the citizens who were tried,” and described “evidence which the court has on file that they were threatened with weapons by Gaddafi forces to [engage in] the building and maintenance of anti-aircraft weapons”.

The men have been held since their capture in August last year by rebels who had taken the city of Tripoli. Libyans and other Africans were detained alongside them. The missiles at the heart of the case were used to target NATO aircraft, which were supporting the rebellion against Gaddafi. The revolt ultimately toppled the regime, which had stood for 42 years.

The trial commenced in April and the prosecution alleged then the men were complicit in Gaddafi attacks on civilians whilst being “in the pay of Gaddafi and his brigades”. Ukraine vowed then to seek freedom for its citizens, or at least repatriation to serve sentence.

The defendants appeared in a cage within Tripoli’s Court Complex to hear the outcome. An estimated 1,500 Ukrainians were in Libya when the conflict erupted in February last year, with Libya-Ukraine relations strong under Gaddafi’s leadership. Gaddafi’s nurse was Ukrainian and the European nation, alongside Russia, was among the last countries to recognise the legitimacy of the new government in Libya.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 30, 2012

French journalists claim Gaddafi promised Sarkozy campaign €50 million

French journalists claim Gaddafi promised Sarkozy campaign €50 million

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, April 30, 2012

France
Related articles
  • 2 July 2015: Francesc Solé wins Andorra Ultra Trail again
  • 1 June 2015: Kerry hospitalized after cycling accident
  • 22 May 2015: Germanwings crash victims identified
  • 18 May 2015: France rejects European Union’s asylum seeker quota initiative
  • 9 May 2015: Copilot practiced putting plane into controlled descent prior to crash of Germanwings Flight 9525, French authorities say
Location of France
France (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

French news website Mediapart has published a document it says shows the late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi pledged French President Nicolas Sarkozy 50 million (£42 million) to fund his 2007 election campaign.

Sarkozy, who gained power in that election, is now fighting a reelection bid but lagging behind socialist opposition leader Francois Hollande in opinion polls. A run-off election is scheduled for May 6.

Sarkozy and Gaddafi are among the world leaders seen here at the G8 summit in 2009.

Had the deal gone ahead it would have breached French law, which bans political donations of such magnitude. Although the Arabic document, apparently signed by Libya’s then-foreign intelligence head Mussa Kussa, dates to 2006 and does not indicate any cash was actually handed over, some reports claim money was laundered via Panama and Switzerland.

Sarkozy spokeswoman Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet said the claims were “ridiculous” and invented by Hollande supporters. She said Sarkozy’s election finances were vetted at the time. Hollande spokesman Bernard Cazeneuve said Sarkozy must now “explain himself to the French in the face of such serious elements backed up by new documents emanating from the entourage of the Libyan dictator himself.”

It is not the first time such allegations have been made. As France backed an uprising which ultimately toppled Gaddafi, the Libyan ruler’s son Seif al-Islam last year made the same claim. Mediapart in March published allegations from a doctor who used to treat a local arms dealer, who said his patient had organised such a donation. Sarkozy himself said the suggestion was “grotesque”.

The newly-released document states as present Libya’s head of African investment, Bashir Saleh; Sarkozy ally Brice Hortefeux; Libyan intelligence chief Abdullah Senussi; and arms dealer Ziad Takieddine. It is dated October 6, 2006 and discusses an “agreement in principle to support the campaign for the candidate for the presidential elections, Nicolas Sarkozy, for a sum equivalent to €50 million.”

Hortefeux has denied ever meeting Kussa or Saleh.

Mediapart is a respected left-wing investigative website. It is generally viewed as opposing Sarkozy’s right-wing regime. It claims money was laundered via accounts including one in the name of Sarkozy’s political party’s head’s sister, and says governmental briefing notes indicate regular funding trips to and from Libya. Mediapart says its sources are “former senior officials now in hiding.”

When al-Islam first made his claims, he said “Sarkozy must first give back the money he took from Libya to finance his electoral campaign. We funded it and we have all the details and are ready to reveal everything.” Sarkozy was dismissive when interviewed this year on TF1, saying “I am sorry to see you in the role of a spokeswoman for Gaddafi’s son, frankly I’ve known you in better roles… I am sorry that I am being interrogated about declarations of Gaddafi or his son on an important channel like TF1. When one quotes Mr Gaddafi, who is dead, his son, who has blood on his hands, that is a regime of dictators, assassins, whose credibility is zero… frankly, I think we have sunk low enough in the political debate.”

An investigation is already ongoing into Takieddine. Takieddine is accused of illegally financing Edouard Balladur in an unsuccessful presidential bid in 1995. Sarkozy, who was spokesman for that campaign, denies wrongdoing in relation to it. It is suspected Balladur received kickback bribes from Pakistan in a submarine sale. Investigators believe eleven French engineers were killed in a bomb attack orchestrated as Pakistani revenge revenge for bribe non-payment.

Kosciusko-Morizet suggests Hollande’s supporters arranged the new claims to coincide with allegations made by former International Monetary Fund head Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Strauss-Kahn fell from favour after a well-publicised sexual encounter with a hotel maid in the US and last week claimed Sarkozy arranged for allegations to be made in order to prevent Strauss-Kahn running against him for president.

“If he had financed it, I wasn’t very grateful,” Sarkozy said previously about the allegations. France played an active role in Gaddafi’s downfall last year, providing military support to a NATO mission against the Libyan ruler.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Former Libyan oil minister drowns

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, April 30, 2012

Libya
Other stories from Libya
Wikinews Ongoing Coverage of the Libyan Rebellion.svg
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

The Danube River.

Former Libyan Oil Minister Shukri Ghanem was found dead April 29 floating in the Danube River in Vienna, Austria. Ghanem, 69, served under Moammar Gadhafi. Ghanem was the Libyan Prime Minister from 2003 to 2006. He later served as the oil minister until he defected to Rome in June of 2011 amid opposition from NATO.

Libya continued to trade oil with Ghanem, one of a select few who came from Gadhafi’s regime.

Prior to his death, Ghanem was working as a consultant for a company in Vienna. He worked to separate himself from Gadhafi’s regime and was opposed to the violence associated with the Libyan old regime.

Ghanem left his home Sunday in everyday attire. His daughter noticed he was missing around 10 a.m. An autopsy report revealed that Ghanem died by drowning. Although officials suspect no foul play, as there was no sign of violence to the body, Vienna police spokesman Roland Hahslinger reported that all options regarding the cause of Ghanem’s drowning are still open.

Toxicology reports have been ordered and results should be available later this week.


Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 27, 2012

Wikinews Shorts: January 27, 2012

Wikinews Shorts: January 27, 2012 – Wikinews, the free news source

Wikinews Shorts: January 27, 2012

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

A compilation of brief news reports for Friday, January 27, 2012.

If you believe any of these stories deserves more in-depth coverage, feel free to write a full article on the issues raised.

Medicins Sans Frontieres announces partial withdrawal over Libyan torture abuses

Medicins Sans Frontieres (MSF) have announced a partial withdrawal from Libya. The medical charity announced they will no longer work at Libyan detention centres due to facing treating torture victims in order to make them well enough to be further tortured. MSF General Director Christopher Stokes said: “Our role is to provide medical care to war casualties and sick detainees, not to repeatedly treat the same patients between torture sessions”.

The United Nations estimates that some 8,500 former Gaddafi loyalists are being held by a number of unregulated, and unaccountable, armed groups.



Jagger tells World Economic Forum, “can’t always get what you want”

Lead singer of The Rolling Stones Mick Jagger has withdrawn from the ‘Great British Tea Party’ in Davos, Switzerland.

Cutting short his visit to the 2012 World Economic Forum, as well as pulling out of Prime Minister David Cameron’s event intended to promote UK creativity, Jagger complained of both “being used as a political football” and “comment[s] about my political allegiances which are inaccurate.”



UK Prime Minister calls for European Union to be more competetive

Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, the UK Prime Minister David Cameron called on European Union leaders to be “bold” and “decisive” to boost growth and promote business.

Labelling a proposed financial transactions tax as “madness” he attacked “unnecessary” regulations on business, telling attendees that “Europe’s lack of competitiveness remains its Achilles heel.”



Coup in Papua New Guinea fails

A military coup in Papua New Guinea failed with the capture of at least fifteen mutineers. These supporters of deposed former Prime Minister Sir Michael Thomas Somare seized a military barracks, and the nation’s military head, early on Thursday morning and demanded Somare be reinstated.

The Supreme Court of Papua New Guinea previously ruled that Somare be reinstated, concluding that current Prime Minister Peter O’Neill was unlawfully appointed.



Australian Prime Minister rescued from protesters

During an Australia Day function, the country’s Prime Minister, Julia Gillard — and the leader of the opposition, Tony Abbott, had to be rescued after they were surrounded by as many as 200 aboriginal rights protesters at a Canberra restaurant.

The protesters, from the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, appear to have been angered by Abbot’s suggestion that it was time for the Embassy, now in its fortieth year, to come down.





Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 23, 2011

UN wants Gaddafi\’s death probed

UN wants Gaddafi’s death probed – Wikinews, the free news source

UN wants Gaddafi’s death probed

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Libya
Other stories from Libya
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

A photo of Muammar Gaddafi in 2009.
Image: U.S. Navy.

The United Nations and two human rights groups are pressing for an investigation into the death of Muammar Gaddafi.

U.N. human rights spokesman Rupert Colville from the Office of the U.N. High Commission for Human Rights said in a statement on Friday that “there seem to be four or five different versions of how he died,” and that “more details are needed to ascertain whether he was killed in the fighting or after his capture.”

Specifically pressed on the possibility Gaddafi was executed whilst detained, he said, “It has to be one possibility when you look at these two videos. So that’s something that an investigation needs to look into.”

“Summary executions are strictly illegal under any circumstances. It’s different if someone is killed in combat. There was a civil war taking place in Libya. So if the person died as part of combat, that is a different issue and that is normally acceptable under the circumstances,” Colville said.

“But if something else has happened, if someone is captured and then deliberately killed, then that is a very serious matter,” he said.

Amnesty International, a human rights group, has urged the National Transitional Council to reveal the circumstances surrounding Gaddafi’s death.

Questions have lingered about the true cause of Gaddafi’s death, with two separate videos showing him wounded and bloodied but alive and another showing him already dead with a bullet wound on his head.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 20, 2011

Former Libyan leader Gaddafi killed

Former Libyan leader Gaddafi killed – Wikinews, the free news source

Former Libyan leader Gaddafi killed

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Libya
Other stories from Libya
  • 16 February 2015: Islamic State execute 21 Coptic Christians held in Libya
  • 15 September 2014: Libya accuse Qatar of intervening on side of rebels
  • 7 September 2014: Libya accuse Sudan of arming ‘terrorist group’
  • 28 August 2014: US says Egypt and UAE responsible for air attacks on Tripoli
  • 24 August 2014: Renegade General’s forces claim responsibility for aerial attacks on Tripoli
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

A photo of Muammar Gaddafi in 2009.
Image: U.S. Navy.

Former Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has been killed after heavy fighting in his home town of Sirte.

Libyan television today announced that former Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi was killed by revolutionary forces in Sirte following weeks of brutal fighting.

The Libyan Prime minister said Gaddafi was captured unharmed by National Transitional Council forces but was shot in the head during crossfire with Gaddafi loyalists, and died soon after. There are various other, conflicting reports on Gaddafi’s cause of death.

Cquote1.svg Colonel Gaddafi is history Cquote2.svg

—Mahmoud Shammam

The National Transitional Council Information Minister Mahmoud Shammam has said that the death of Gaddafi was “a great victory for the Libyan people” and that “Colonel Gaddafi is history”.

A picture of a wounded man taken from a mobile phone was released shortly after the news of his capture broke, although it could not be independently verified whether the man was indeed Gaddafi.

Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 22, 2011

Libya: Rebels edge closer to Tripoli

Libya: Rebels edge closer to Tripoli – Wikinews, the free news source

Libya: Rebels edge closer to Tripoli

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, August 22, 2011

Libya
Other stories from Libya
  • 16 February 2015: Islamic State execute 21 Coptic Christians held in Libya
  • 15 September 2014: Libya accuse Qatar of intervening on side of rebels
  • 7 September 2014: Libya accuse Sudan of arming ‘terrorist group’
  • 28 August 2014: US says Egypt and UAE responsible for air attacks on Tripoli
  • 24 August 2014: Renegade General’s forces claim responsibility for aerial attacks on Tripoli
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

2009 file photo of Muammar Gaddafi.
Image: U.S. Navy.

Libyan rebels edged closer to the capital city of Tripoli on Sunday to help fellow mutineers inside the city who declared a final clash with leader Muammar Gaddafi.

Following a night marred with gunfire, the rebels said that they controlled a handful of Tripoli’s localities. With the rebels within about 25 km of Tripoli, Gaddafi’s hold on power looks fragile. He labelled the rebels, who had been fighting for the past six months, as “rats” and said that he would not yield to their demands.

A coordinated revolt that rebels had been secretly planning for months saw gunfire across Tripoli, instantly after Muslim clerics called people onto the streets. The revolution, combined with rebels advancing to the capital’s periphery, appears to signal the critical chapter in the “Arab Spring” uprising, which is in its sixth-month now.

“The rebels may have risen too early in Tripoli and the result could be a lot of messy fighting,” said Oliver Miles, a former British ambassador to Libya. “The regime may not have collapsed in the city to quite the extent they think it has.”

The rebels’ advance toward the city was quick, and the mutineers have halved the distance between them and the capital. Government forces put up a brief fight at the village of Al-Maya, leaving behind a burned-out tank, and some torched cars. On their way to Tripoli, the rebels paused long enough and filled some walls with graffiti, one reading: “We are here and we are fighting Gaddafi.”

In Benghazi, the rebels’ main stronghold and the genesis of the revolt, a senior official said everything was going according to plan. “Our revolutionaries are controlling several neighborhoods and others are coming in from outside the city to join their brothers at this time,” said Abdel Hafiz Ghoga, vice chairman of the rebel National Transition Council.

Gaddafi — in hiding since the NATO attacks on Libya in June — said in an audio recording broadcast late yesterday that he had no intention of succumbing to the rebellion. A spokesman for Gaddafi, Moussa Ibrahim, in a briefing for foreign reporters echoed the message of defiance and said: “The armed units defending Tripoli from the rebels wholeheartedly believe that if this city is captured, the blood will run everywhere; so they may as well fight to the end.”

Cquote1.svg Those rats … were attacked by the masses tonight and we eliminated them Cquote2.svg

—Muammar Gaddafi

HAVE YOUR SAY
Wikinews commentary.svg
Is the revolt premature?
Add or view comments

“We hold Mr. Obama, Mr. Cameron and Mr. Sarkozy morally responsible for every single unnecessary death that takes place in this country,” he added, referring to the leaders of NATO members, the United States, United Kingdom, and France.

Underground rebel cells in the capital had been following detailed plans developed months ago and had been waiting for a signal to start. The signal was “iftar” – the moment when Muslims who observe the holy months of Ramadan break their daily fast. Imams started broadcasting their message from the loudspeakers of mosques and minarets.

A rebel activist in the city said pro-Gaddafi forces had put snipers on the rooftops of buildings around Bab al-Aziziyah, Gaddafi’s compound, and on the top of a nearby water tower.

State television flashed a message urging citizens not to allow rebels to hide on their rooftops. “Agents and al Qaeda members are trying to destabilize and sabotage the city. You should prevent them from exploiting your houses and buildings, confront them and cooperate with counter-terrorism units, to capture them,” it read.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 24, 2011

Libyan rebels in Misrata restrict press freedoms

Libyan rebels in Misrata restrict press freedoms

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, June 24, 2011

Libya
Other stories from Libya
…More articles here
Location of Libya

A map showing the location of Libya

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Libya, see the Libya Portal
Flag of Libya

Rebel authorities in the Libyan city of Misrata have begun implementing tighter restrictions on foreign journalists in the city this week, in response to fears that spies for President Muammar al-Gaddafi may be among them.

Under the new restrictions, reporters have been barred from traveling to the front lines of the conflict, denied access to high-speed internet links and ordered to use translators approved by Misratan officials. Additionally, reporters accredited by the rebel government based in Benghazi, the National Transitional Council, are no longer recognized as such by local officials and are required to register with Misrata authorities or face deportation.

According to Mohammed Durat, an official in charge of the Misrata media center, the changes have come about because authorities “are afraid of spies from Gaddafi.” He also said that the new restrictions are intended to benefit reporters, saying that “[w]e are caring about you, we don’t want you to get any bad thing” and that “[y]ou should be happy about this.”

Morale in Misrata has fallen in recent weeks, after rebel forces have failed to expand the area they control after a month of fighting and are suffering increasing casualties. In the urban areas, after a month of reletive calm, pro-Gaddafi forces have again begun shelling buildings, with minimal response from NATO forces, despite a declaration on June 14 that NATO helicopter strikes would be carried out if civilian targets were attacked.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress