Wiki Actu en

September 7, 2012

Sandra Fluke featured speaker at Democratic National Convention

Sandra Fluke featured speaker at Democratic National Convention

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, September 7, 2012

Women’s rights
Related stories

Women's rights
More information on Women’s rights at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
  • Women’s rights
  • Women’s health
  • Female education
  • Feminism portal

Women’s rights advocate and Georgetown University Law Center graduate Sandra Fluke was a featured speaker Wednesday at the 2012 Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Sandra Fluke (2012)
Image: nmogburn.

Fluke spoke to attendees at the convention about the consequences for women of electing Republican candidate for U.S. President, Mitt Romney, over incumbent President Barack Obama. Fluke has campaigned with President Obama in his bid for re-election.

Cquote1.svg I’m here because I spoke out, and this November, each of us must speak out. Cquote2.svg

—Sandra Fluke

She encouraged listeners to her speech to use their vote for the next U.S. President as a voice, stating, “I’m here because I spoke out, and this November, each of us must speak out.”

Fluke contrasted possible scenarios which could result from a Republican-controlled White House with that of President Obama’s administration’s support of women’s issues, and commented, “During this campaign, we’ve heard about the two profoundly different futures that could await women — and how one of those futures looks like an offensive, obsolete relic of our past.”

Cquote1.svg During this campaign, we’ve heard about the two profoundly different futures that could await women — and how one of those futures looks like an offensive, obsolete relic of our past. Cquote2.svg

—Sandra Fluke

She concluded her remarks by asserting that Mitt Romney would not place emphasis on women’s rights, observing, “And six months from now, we’ll all be living in one, or the other. But only one. A country where our president either has our back or turns his back.”

Fluke’s speech was well received throughout by the audience, and garnered her a standing ovation from the crowd. After her speech, Fluke took to Twitter to thank convention participants for the positive reaction she received, tweeting, “#DNC2012, THANK YOU for such a warm welcome! But thank you more for standing for #women!”

She was recognized April 22 with the Stand Up for Choice Award. Fluke was given the Stand Up for Choice Award at the “Third Annual Multi-Generational Brunch” of the organization NARAL Pro-Choice America which was held in New York City (NYC), New York in the United States.

Fluke received a nomination in March as a candidate for Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world. The list is released annually as a special edition of Time magazine, titled Time 100.

She gave testimony to the US Congress on February 23 before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee on a hearing about women’s health and contraception. She also worked for Sanctuary for Families in NYC which worked to crackdown on human trafficking and domestic violence.



Related news

Sister links

  • Wikisource-logo.svg Author:Sandra Kay Fluke
  • Commons-logo.svg Sandra Fluke
  • Wikiquote-logo.svg Sandra Fluke

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Speech transcript
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 28, 2012

U.S. Supreme Court upholds health care mandate

U.S. Supreme Court upholds health care mandate

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, June 28, 2012

United States
Related articles
Location of United States
USA orthographic.svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

U.S. Supreme Court building.
Image: Kjetil Ree.

In a decision today, the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the controversial healthcare law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, passed in 2010. The Supreme Court also upheld the individual mandate provision of the law, which would require most U.S. citizens to obtain health insurance by 2014, or pay a monetary penalty.

The Supreme Court ruled on the law 5–4. Chief Justice John Roberts authored the majority opinion. Justices Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor jointed Roberts in the majority, while Samuel Alito, Anthony Kennedy, Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas were in the minority in supporting the repeal of the law.

The Court did, however, strike down a provision of the law which would have expanded Medicaid to make coverage available to anyone with an income less than 138% of the federal poverty line.

President Obama’s statement on the Supreme Court’s decision

President Barack Obama made a public statement from the White House saying that the Supreme Court’s upholding of the law, “reaffirmed a fundamental principle that here in America — in the wealthiest nation on Earth – no illness or accident should lead to any family’s financial ruin.” Obama further added, “Whatever the politics, today’s decision was a victory for people all over this country whose lives will be more secure because of this law and the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold it.” Obama closed his statement by saying, “The highest Court in the land has now spoken. We will continue to implement this law. And we’ll work together to improve on it where we can. But what we won’t do — what the country can’t afford to do — is refight the political battles of two years ago, or go back to the way things were.” Adding, “With today’s announcement, it’s time for us to move forward — to implement and, where necessary, improve on this law.”

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney also gave a statement from Washington, D.C. saying, “What the Court did not do on its last day in session, I will do on my first day if elected President of the United States. And that is I will act to repeal Obamacare.” Romney clarified further by saying, “Let’s make clear that we understand what the Court did and did not do. What the Court did today was say that Obamacare does not violate the Constitution. What they did not do was say that Obamacare is good law or that it’s good policy.” Further adding, “Obamacare was bad policy yesterday. It’s bad policy today. Obamacare was bad law yesterday. It’s bad law today.” Romney closed by saying, “Our mission is clear: If we want to get rid of Obamacare, we’re going to have to replace President Obama.”

Eric Cantor, Republican leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, announced shortly after the ruling that the House would vote on repealing the law on July 11, following the July 4 holiday recess. Cantor said, “The Supreme Court’s decision to uphold Obamacare is a crushing blow to patients throughout the country. Obamacare has failed to keep the President’s basic promise of allowing those who like their health care to keep it, while increasing costs and reducing access to quality care for patients.”

In the ruling of National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, John Roberts wrote, “Simply put, Congress may tax and spend. The federal government may enact a tax on an activity that it cannot authorize, forbid or otherwise control.” Meanwhile, Justice Anthony Kennedy authored the dissenting opinion, saying the entire law should have been repealed.

The ruling on the law comes after 26 states challenged the law in oral arguments in front of the Supreme Court in March.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 4, 2012

U.S. Congressman Thad McCotter aborts write-in campaign

U.S. Congressman Thad McCotter aborts write-in campaign

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, June 4, 2012

U.S. Representative Thaddeus McCotter of Livonia, Michigan decided Saturday not to wage a write-in campaign to seek the Republican Party nomination for his seat, despite a contrary announcement last week. McCotter admitted that he could not oversee such a campaign while simultaneously serving in Congress and assisting with a state investigation into his failed ballot petition.

Official congressional photo of Thaddeus McCotter.
Image: United States Congress.

McCotter, who has represented Michigan’s 11th congressional district since 2003, made history when he became the first sitting congressman in modern times to be denied a spot on his party’s district primary ballot. This occurred after his campaign submitted a petition that fell short of the required 1,000 valid signatures.

Though the submission listed 2,000 signatures, the Michigan Secretary of State deemed only 244 to be valid. The Detroit Newss review of the submission noted duplicate signatures, evidence of photocopying, and signatures seemingly cut and pasted from previous sources. McCotter speculated, “somebody either panicked or it was sabotage…My gut tells me that we got lied to by someone we trusted.”

Afterwards, McCotter wrote an op-ed for The Detroit News announcing the formation of a write-in campaign and taking responsibility for the failed petition, arguing “you clean up your own mess.” Now, citing other responsibilities, he countered his previous point in that “one can’t clean up a mess multitasking.” He now wishes to identify “the person or persons who concocted the fraudulent petitions that have cost me so dearly.” The decision effectively ends his career in Congress for now.

The development comes as former State Senator Loren Bennett announced Friday that he would mount a write-in campaign for the seat’s Republican nomination. He challenges teacher Kerry Bentivolio, who will be the only candidate listed on the August 7 primary ballot. Others are expected to announce write-in campaigns before the filing deadline on July 27.

Though the district is considered safe for Republicans, the turn of events may work to the benefit of Democrats. Canton Township trustee Syed Taj and LaRouche movement activist William Roberts are the only candidates listed for the district’s Democratic primary.

McCotter, who briefly sought the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, won re-election in 2010, 58 percent to 39 percent over his Democratic challenger.



Related news

  • “U.S. Congressman Thad McCotter denied ballot in re-election primary race; announces write-in campaign” — Wikinews, May 30, 2012

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 25, 2012

Sandra Fluke receives Stand Up for Choice Award

Sandra Fluke receives Stand Up for Choice Award

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Women’s rights
Related stories

Women's rights
More information on Women’s rights at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
  • Women’s rights
  • Women’s health
  • Female education
  • Feminism portal

Women’s rights advocate and Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke was recognized Sunday, April 22 with the Stand Up for Choice Award. Fluke was given the Stand Up for Choice Award at the “Third Annual Multi-Generational Brunch” of the organization NARAL Pro-Choice America which was held in New York City (NYC), New York in the United States.

Sandra Fluke reading her prepared testimony
Video: Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Democratic Party (2012).

Cquote1.svg Sandra is a remarkable leader and a true hero in the reproductive-rights community. Cquote2.svg

Nancy Keenan, NARAL President

The organization’s president, Nancy Keenan, attended the event and had previously spoken in favor of Fluke in a press release announcing the award. “Sandra is a remarkable leader and a true hero in the reproductive-rights community. This event brings together women and men from many generations, and the one thing that unites us all is the personal stories that are the reason for our joining this cause. Without a doubt, many people have witnessed Sandra’s strength over these last few weeks and have been inspired to join her in standing up for women’s freedom and privacy.”

Chair of the NARAL Pro-Choice America’s Future Direction Committee Amanda Hirsh released a statement in support of Fluke saying, “we are thrilled to honor Sandra Fluke with the Stand Up For Choice Award at this year’s multi-generational brunch. Attempts to silence voices like Sandra’s have failed. Young leaders across the country are looking to Sandra as an inspiration.”

Cquote1.svg I was honored to receive it! Thank you! I’m very humbled by the inspiring stories women told of their own lives. Cquote2.svg

—Sandra Fluke

Fluke responded to a post on Twitter from NARAL congratulating her on receiving the award, stating, “I was honored to receive it! Thank you! I’m very humbled by the inspiring stories women told of their own lives.”

Fluke received a nomination in March as a candidate for Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world. The list is released annually as a special edition of Time magazine, titled Time 100.

She gave testimony to the US Congress on February 23 before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee on a hearing about women’s health and contraception. She also worked for Sanctuary for Families in NYC which worked to crackdown on human trafficking and domestic violence.



Related news

  • “Sandra Fluke named candidate for Time’s 100 most influential people” — Wikinews, March 30, 2012
  • “Sandra Fluke, Chelsea Clinton and Christine Quinn on women in politics” — Wikinews, March 29, 2012
  • Sandra Fluke insists she will not be silenced” — Wikinews, March 14, 2012

Sister links

  • Wikisource-logo.svg Author:Sandra Kay Fluke
  • Commons-logo.svg Sandra Fluke
  • Wikiquote-logo.svg Sandra Fluke

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 30, 2012

US Senator Rand Paul blocks synthetic marijuana legislation

US Senator Rand Paul blocks synthetic marijuana legislation

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, March 30, 2012

Sen. Rand Paul is the junior senator from Kentucky. He took office for the first time in 2011.
Image: United States Senate.

Rep. Charles Dent, R-PA, introduces legislation (HR 1254) to ban the ingredients found in synthetic marijuana Dec. 7, 2011, on the House floor. The House passed the legislation Dec. 8, 2011.
Video: C-SPAN.

Rep. Bobby Scott, D-VA, speaks in opposition to the Synthetic Drug Control Act of 2011 (HR 1254) by arguing that it is excessive in scope, imposes limits on researchers, and bypasses the existing process of banning substances. The legislation passed the next day, Dec. 8, 2011 by 317–98.
Video: C-SPAN.

Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is the lone holdout preventing a vote on synthetic marijuana legislation in the US Senate through a procedural block that is allowed under the rules. Until Paul lifts his block, the Senate will not be able to act on legislation that has already passed the US House of Representatives last December. Wikinews has investigated the block on the legislation.

Synthetic marijuana can be sold over the counter in some places and it is commonly known by brand names, such as “K2” or “Spice”. Other types of synthetic “designer” drugs, like “bath salts“, belong to a class of substances that are in some cases legal, though they create a health hazard, because they are declared not meant for human consumption.

At issue in the legislation is the amount of chemical substances banned, the criminalization of substances, the authority of the federal versus the state government to makes those decisions, the extent to which the product is a threat or hazard to public health and safety, and the effect such a law would have on the research of these substances. All of these issues were debated in the House. Paul has made an issue of the long prison sentences for marijuana. His critics claim he is going too far by blocking legislation. Paul, a Republican who has libertarian leanings, has argued that the states should have the authority to ban drugs.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, 31 states have a ban on both synthetic cannabinoids and substituted cathinones while 39 states have a ban on synthetic cannabinoids. Rand’s home state of Kentucky bans both. But legislation is not a perfect solution; in Cass County, Michigan, four teenagers between the ages of 13 and 14 had an emergency after using synthetic marijuana, but even though Michigan bans both, police are not sure that the substances are illegal. Chemists have to conduct tests on the products.

Although Paul is framing the issue as a legal one, the medical community has turned its attention to this new phenomenon’s impact on public health and safety. In an article that appeared in the March 2012 issue of Pediatriacs, medical researchers led by Dr. Joanna Cohen analyzed the cases of three teens who were hospitalized and treated as emergencies after an incident of synthetic marijuana use. One 16-year-old girl lost her motor skills and was unresponsive yet she had an exceptionally high heart rate and abnormal blood pressure. An 18-year-old boy was extremely sweaty, had a high heart rate and was agitated. And a 16-year-old boy had a speech dysfunction, as well as symptoms of agitation and confusion. The doctors who wrote the study say people are using this product because they believe it can give them a high similar to marijuana, however, the new drug can bring on both psychological symptoms, like psychosis and paranoia, and physical ones, such as convulsions.

One out of every nine high school students has reported use of synthetic marijuana, according to Monitoring the Future released in December 2011. The annual survey can be used to spot new trends in substance use among youth and the report included synthetic marijuana for the first time in 2011.

Poison centers noticed a sharp increase in calls reporting incidents due to synthetic marijuana. According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, in 2010 centers nationwide took 2,906 calls for synthetic marijuana cases, but by 2011, they took 6,959 calls. The problem is noticeable to local health officials, like in Syracuse, New York, which is Senator Chuck Schumer’s state, where 120 cases were reported and one health professional called it “a significant public health concern.” New York has a ban on substituted cathinones but not synthetic canabanoids, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Although the US Drug Enforcement Agency placed five substances that fall under synthetic marijuana into Schedule I on March 1, 2011, its emergency powers only last one and a half years and its ban has not stopped other substances from being used instead. Schedule I is a running list of banned chemicals.

Cquote1.svg … let us move forward with a vote Cquote2.svg

—Sen. Chuck Schumer

Three of Paul’s Senate senior colleagues say Paul should drop his block. Senators Chuck Grassley, Chuck Schumer, and Amy Klobuchar are sponsoring bipartisan legislation that aims to ban synthetic marijuana as a serious health threat. The legislation is bipartisan as Grassley is a Republican , while both Schumer and Klobuchar are Democrats. Senator Schumer, in an editorial for the New York Daily News, advocated tackling synthetic marijuana at the national level rather than at the state. Schumer’s argument is that states have tried to ban the ingredients commonly found these products but the manufacturers have the flexibility to alter the ingredients to bypass the law. Schumer said the federal government needs a proactive rather than a reactive stance against drugs. “All we need is one senator, Rand Paul of Kentucky, to release his block on this legislation,” wrote Schumer. “We’re urging him to do the right thing, and let us move forward with a vote.”

Before the Senate took up the issue, similar legislation had already passed in the House. The House voted 317–98 in favor of the Synthetic Drug Control Act of 2011 on December 8, 2011. Pennsylvania Congressperson Charles Dent sponsored the legislation that would add ingredients found in synthetic marijuana to Schedule I. Dent’s legislation included chemicals that are not even found in the United States at this time, but he argues that synthetic marijuana is too great of a public health threat to dismiss.

Standing in opposition to the legislation, Virginia Congressperson Bobby Scott and several fellow Democrats argued Dent’s legislation was bypassing a process for the banning of drugs that was already in place and established. Scott also argued some of the substances banned by the legislation were not even present in the United States but so far only in Europe. His colleagues argued researchers would lose the ability to conduct research freely on these substances and, as Scott noted, the legislation was seeking to ban substances but without any research to back it up.

Grassley’s legislation is named for David Rozga, an Iowan who committed suicide after using synthetic marijuana. In his speech, before the Senate, Grassley said Rozga’s situation inspired him to put forward the legislation.

For some families, the issue has also become an emotional one, as they have lost a loved one. Karen Dobner, a mother from Aurora, Illinois, is blaming Senator Paul for any deaths that may still occur because he is holding up a legislative solution to a problem that she says killed her own son. When her son Max was in college, he tried a synthetic marijuana product and had a panic attack. Dobner believes the car crash that killed her son would not have happened had he not been experiencing the symptoms of the designer drug. Now Dobner keeps calling Paul’s office begging him to stop his hold.

Senator Paul’s office was contacted by both phone and email about this report but it did not respond.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Sandra Fluke named candidate for Time\’s 100 most influential people

Sandra Fluke named candidate for Time’s 100 most influential people

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, March 30, 2012

Women’s rights
Related stories

Women's rights
More information on Women’s rights at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
  • Women’s rights
  • Women’s health
  • Female education
  • Feminism portal

Women’s rights advocate and Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke has been named as a candidate for Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world. The list is released annually as a special edition of Time magazine, titled Time 100.

Sandra Fluke reading her prepared testimony
Video: Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Democratic Party (2012).

Time announced the candidates as part of a ballot process which began Thursday, and solicited votes from the public via the Internet. Visitors to its website were requested to select “the leaders, artists, innovators, icons and heroes that they think are the most influential people in the world.” The winner of the poll as selected by visitors to the Time website will be featured in the Time 100 issue, and the magazine’s editors pick those individuals showcased on the actual complete list of 100.

Cquote1.svg I would do this again, because these issues are that important to me. Cquote2.svg

—Sandra Fluke

In its entry for Fluke, Time characterized her as a “law student and political activist”. She gave testimony to the US Congress on February 23 before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee on a hearing about women’s health and contraception.

When contacted by Time, Fluke commented that though she has faced attacks in the media, she did not regret her actions: “I would do this again, because these issues are that important to me.”

In addition to Sandra Fluke, other influential women named as candidates for the Time 100 list include Queen Elizabeth II; comedian and talk show host Ellen DeGeneres; musicians Lady Gaga, Adele, Jessica Simpson and Lana Del Rey; Portlandia creator and star Carrie Brownstein; and actresses Kristen Wiig and Melissa McCarthy of the film Bridesmaids.

Online voting for the poll winner closes April 6; Time will release the full list of Time 100 on April 17.



Related news

Sister links

  • Wikisource-logo.svg Author:Sandra Kay Fluke
  • Commons-logo.svg Sandra Fluke
  • Wikiquote-logo.svg Sandra Fluke

Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 14, 2012

Sandra Fluke insists she will not be silenced

Sandra Fluke insists she will not be silenced

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Health
Related stories

Health
More information on Health at Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
  • Health
  • Health care
  • Medicine
  • Medicine portal

In an opinion piece published by CNN on Tuesday, Georgetown University law student and women’s rights advocate Sandra Fluke insisted she will not allow slurs from critics to silence her and other women from continuing to speak out on issues regarding women’s health and contraception.

Sandra Fluke (2012).
Image: United States Congress .

Fluke has faced slurs and personal attacks after speaking before the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee in the United States House of Representatives about women’s health and contraception. She was called a “slut” and a “prostitute” by talk radio show host Rush Limbaugh. In response to these attacks, Fluke has received public support from women, members of the media, and politicians including the President of the United States.

Cquote1.svg Attacking me and women who use contraception by calling us prostitutes and worse cannot silence us. Cquote2.svg

—Sandra Fluke

In her piece for CNN, Fluke took the opportunity to thank her supporters, writing, “By now, many have heard the stories I wanted to share thanks to the congressional leaders and members of the media who have supported me and millions of women in speaking out.” She characterized the “opponents of reproductive health access” who issued personal attacks against her as being motivated by an attempt to change the topic of conversation away from a dialogue about women’s health, and “to silence women’s voices regarding their own health care.”

Sandra Fluke discussing her prepared U.S. Congressional testimony
Video: United States Congress .

Fluke wrote that the efforts by some to drown out women from speaking out about women’s health were unsuccessful. She came to this conclusion due to the multitude of positive comments and encouragement sent to her by both female and male individuals urging that contraception medication be considered a medical necessity.

Asserting that she would not remain silent on this issue of women’s health, Fluke wrote, “Attacking me and women who use contraception by calling us prostitutes and worse cannot silence us.”

She noted that a significant majority of women have utilized contraception medication, and commented that there exists a social disconnect between politicians attempting to make it more difficult for women to access this type of health care, and the views of society-at-large about the matter: “Restricting access to such a basic health care service, which 99% of sexually experienced American women have used and 62% of American women are using right now, is out of touch with public sentiment.”

Fluke concluded her piece by emphasizing that those in power should not govern based on ideology: “I am proud to stand with the millions of women and men who recognize that our government should legislate according to the reality of our lives — not for ideology.”

After being banned by Congressman Darrell Issa from speaking before a Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on February 16 which consisted mainly of male panelists, Fluke appeared before a meeting of the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee convened by Minority leader of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi on February 23.

Fluke spoke to the committee about the need for contraception to be covered by health care plans offered by employers, as a matter integral to women’s health. She cited multiple cases where women take contraception medication as part of their health care for treatment of medical conditions unrelated to birth control, including two women who suffer from polycystic ovarian syndrome, a woman who is afflicted with endometriosis and another who takes contraception in order to prevent seizures.

Cquote1.svg Time and time again, women have been silenced in this discussion, a discussion about our own very personal health care decisions. Cquote2.svg

—U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen

U.S. President Barack Obama discusses his phone call to Sandra Fluke. (March 6, 2012)
Video: The White House .

Speaking before the United States Senate on February 17 along with fellow members Patty Murray, Kirsten Gillibrand, Barbara Boxer, and Charles Schumer, Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire expressed her support for Fluke. Like Fluke, Senator Shaheen pointed out the need not to silence the voices of women in the public government debate about women’s health care: “Time and time again, women have been silenced in this discussion, a discussion about our own very personal health care decisions.” Senator Shaheen concluded her remarks with an explanation as to why she believes women should have significant representation in discussions about their health care: “Women deserve a voice in this debate because, after all, in the end this is about our health and it is about a health care decision that is between women, their families, their doctors, and their own faith.”

President Barack Obama called Fluke on March 2 to express his support for her courage to speak out on issues of women’s health. In his first press conference of 2012 on March 6, he discussed his reasons for deciding to call Fluke.

The President cited his personal thoughts about his own two daughters: “And the reason I called Ms. Fluke is because I thought about Malia and Sasha [Obama’s daughters], and one of the things I want them to do as they get older is to engage in issues they care about, even ones I may not agree with them on. I want them to be able to speak their mind in a civil and thoughtful way. And I don’t want them attacked or called horrible names because they’re being good citizens.”

President Obama went on to state that Fluke served as a positive role model for citizen participation in democracy and society: “And I wanted Sandra to know that I thought her parents should be proud of her, and that we want to send a message to all our young people that being part of a democracy involves argument and disagreements and debate, and we want you to be engaged, and there’s a way to do it that doesn’t involve you being demeaned and insulted, particularly when you’re a private citizen.”



Sister links

  • Wikisource-logo.svg Author:Sandra Kay Fluke
  • Commons-logo.svg Sandra Fluke
  • Wikiquote-logo.svg Sandra Fluke

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Wikinews
This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 4, 2012

Susan G. Komen Foundation reneges on Planned Parenthood funding cuts

Susan G. Komen Foundation reneges on Planned Parenthood funding cuts

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, February 4, 2012

Health
Related articles

Health
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Susan G. Komen for the Cure has announced it will continue to fund breast cancer screening and educational programming on breast health run by fellow US-charity Planned Parenthood and its affiliates. This news comes shortly after Komen announced it would cut funding to Planned Parenthood due to an ongoing investigation.

Komen for the Cure founder Nancy Brinker in 2009
Image: Cliff.

Komen has changed its internal criteria for grant funding. Previously, it would not support any organization under investigation of any kind; now it says it will only cut support if the investigation involved is “criminal and conclusive”. The old criteria disqualified Planned Parenthood because it was under investigation by United States House Energy Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Chairman Representative Cliff Stearns.

In a statement on Komen’s website, the Board of Directors and founder Nancy G. Brinker wrote, “We want to apologize to the American public for recent decisions that cast doubt upon our commitment to our mission of saving women’s lives. The events of this week have been deeply unsettling for our supporters, partners and friends and all of us at Susan G. Komen. We have been distressed at the presumption that the changes made to our funding criteria were done for political reasons or to specifically penalize Planned Parenthood. They were not.”

Planned Parenthood said in response to the restoration of Komen’s funding, it was “enormously grateful”.

Since the cuts were announced, Planned Parenthood gained $3 million (€2.3m, £1.9m) in donations and 10,000 new Facebook likes. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg personally pledged $250,000 (€190k, £158k). 26 US Senators signed a public letter to the charity; in it they said, “It would be tragic if any woman — let alone thousands of women — lost access to these potentially lifesaving screenings because of a politically motivated attack.”



Related News

“Susan G. Komen Foundation stops funding to Planned Parenthood” — Wikinews, February 2, 2012

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 2, 2012

Susan G. Komen Foundation stops funding to Planned Parenthood

Susan G. Komen Foundation stops funding to Planned Parenthood

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Health
Related articles

Health
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Thursday, February 2, 2012

US Navy Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III completes crosses the finish line of the annual Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure

Susan G. Komen for the Cure has stopped funding breast cancer screening and educational programming on breast health run by fellow US-charity Planned Parenthood and its affiliates. The Komen institute cites an ongoing investigation, while Planned Parenthood blame political pressures.

Planned Parenthood received nearly $700,000 from the Komen Foundation last year alone. In the last five years, the funding from the foundation has granted 170,000 women breast exams.

Leslie Aun, a spokesperson for the Komen Foundation, said the organization adopted a new rule that does not allow grants or funding to be awarded to organizations that are under legal investigation. Komen’s policy disqualified Planned Parenthood due to a pending investigation on how Planned Parenthood spends and reports its money that is being conducted by Representative Cliff Stearns. Stearns is investigating whether taxes are used to fund abortions through Planned Parenthood in his role as chairman of the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, which is under the umbrella of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

“While it is regrettable when changes in priorities and policies affect any of our grantees, such as a longstanding partner like Planned Parenthood, we must continue to evolve to best meet the needs of the women we serve and most fully advance our mission,” Aun said.

Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood, said, “While this is deeply disturbing and disappointing, we want to assure women who rely on Planned Parenthood for breast care that we’re still here for them, and we always will be. The new fund we’re launching to support these services will ensure that the Komen Foundation’s decision doesn’t jeopardize women’s health.”


 
This story has updates
 
See Susan G. Komen Foundation reneges on Planned Parenthood funding cuts, February 4, 2012
 

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 23, 2011

U.S. Congress reaches deal on payroll tax cut extension

U.S. Congress reaches deal on payroll tax cut extension

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, December 23, 2011

United States
Related articles
Location of United States
USA orthographic.svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Speaker of the U.S. House John Boehner announced yesterday that he would agree to a two-month extension of the payroll tax cut. In an effort to end the impasse between the House and Senate, Boehner told Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid that he would schedule a House vote on the Senate version of the bill that would extend the tax cut, which was due to expire at the end of the year.

Speaker John Boehner (pictured) announced yesterday that he would agree to a two-month extension of the payroll tax cut.
Image: U.S. Congress.

Speaker Boehner announced the agreement in a brief statement: “Senator Reid and I have reached an agreement that will ensure taxes do not increase for working families on January 1”. Boehner informed other congressmen of the deal in a conference call yesterday evening.

The House may pass the bill via unanimous consent today, which would not require the presence of all members. Boehner and Reid also agreed to a bipartisan negotiation committee to sort out differences and extend the tax cut for an entire year, a goal recently sought by Republicans in the House.

The extension of the payroll tax cut, which would prevent approximately 160 million Americans from seeing a tax increase in 2012, had already been passed by the Senate last weekend. Earlier yesterday, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell joined several other Republican Senators in encouraging the House to pass the extension.

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid said that once the House acts, he “will be happy to restart the negotiating process to forge a yearlong extension.” At a news conference, Speaker Boehner issued a statement: “We have fought the good fight. Why not do the right thing for the American people even though it’s not exactly what we want.” President Obama also responded to the development in a statement: “This is good news, just in time for the holidays. This is the right thing to do to strengthen our families, grow our economy, and create new jobs. This is real money that will make a real difference in people’s lives.”

The tax cut extension impasse began when the House effectively rejected the Senate-approved version of the bill on Tuesday after being faced with opposition from House Republicans, specifically those associated with the Tea Party movement, who advocated for spending cuts and the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline.



Related news

  • “U.S. House rejects Senate version of payroll tax cut” — Wikinews, December 21, 2011

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Powered by WordPress