Wiki Actu en

June 29, 2014

Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships

Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Spain‘s men’s national goalball team arrived in Espoo, Finland Friday for the start of the 2014 IBSA Goalball World Championships. The team comes into the tournament with the goal of securing a medal, which would qualify them for the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro. The team missed the 2012 Summer Paralympics.

Head coach Francisco Monreal said, “The objective is to reach the medal round, and qualify directly for the 2016 Games, but we need to be realistic and not think game by game, we can get a surprise. […] The competition will be decided in one game, head or tails, where it doesn’t matter what happened before.((es))

Coming into the competition, the team was ranked eleventh in the world based on the IBSA Unofficial rankings published late last month, down one spot from the April rankings. The team is scheduled to play their first game against the ninth ranked United States men’s team on Monday morning, before playing twenty-first ranked Germany later in the afternoon. Their other scheduled competitors in pool play are top ranked Iran, third ranked Algeria, seventh ranked Finland, twelfth ranked Czech Republic and twentieth ranked Ukraine. The team needs to finish in the top four in their group to advance to the second round.

The team’s roster includes Jose Daniel Fernández, Cristian Santamaria, Félix Vargas, Roman Martínez, Jesús Santana, and Javier Serrato. They are led by head coach Monreal, with assistant coach Carles Estrany and physiotherapist José Bravo. The team is drawn from around the country, with Santana playing for a club in the Canary Islands, Serrato playing for Valencia, Fernández for Madrid area Chamartín, Santamaría for Cantabria, Vargas coming from Barcelona and Martínez from Aragón.

Absent from the 2012 Summer Paralympics, the last major international competition the team competed in was the 2010 Goalball World Championships in Sheffield, England where the team finished fifth. In last year’s IBSA European Goalball Championships in Turkey, the team finished second, behind World Championship hosts and Paralympic gold medalists Finland.

Goalball was created in 1946, exclusively for people with a visual disability and designed to help with the rehabilitation of veterans returning from World War II. Play in the Paralympics consists of two twelve-minute periods, with a three minute break between halves. Players are blindfolded to ensure all are equally visually handicapped on-court, and the game can be stopped to ensure goggles are properly fitted. Standing in front of a long goal, they throw the ball at the opposition team’s net who in turn try to block it by listening to the ball, which contains a bell, and using their bodies to prevent the ball from going in. The audience is asked to remain silent during play.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 26, 2014

Belgian men\’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships

Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories
  • 7 July 2015: England defeats Germany 1-0 in FIFA Women’s World Cup 2015 third place playoff
  • 6 July 2015: Chile beats Argentina to win first Copa America title
  • 4 July 2015: Peru defeats Paraguay 2-0 in Copa America 2015 third place playoff
  • 2 July 2015: Argentina defeats Paraguay 6-1 in Copa America 2015 semi-finals
  • 2 July 2015: Francesc Solé wins Andorra Ultra Trail again

Belgian national team selfie the day they departed for the World Championship. Pictured are Klison Mapreni, Tom Vanhove and Youssef Bihi
Image: Klison Mapreni.

This morning European time, the Belgium men’s national goalball team departed for Espoo, Finland for the 2014 IBSA Goalball World Championships. The championship is the biggest competition since the 2012 Summer Paralympics.

The team is scheduled to play their opening game on the morning of June 30 against Brazil men’s national goalball team. They are scheduled to play their second game of pool play against Turkey men’s national goalball team later that afternoon. Their remaining games in pool play are against Canada, Lithuania, Egypt, China and Japan.

The members of the team are Bruno Vanhove, Tom Vanhove, Klison Mapreni, Youssef Bihi, Wassime Amnir and Glenn Van Thournout. They are coached by Jean Claude Meulemans and Werner Van Thournout. 30-year-old teammates Bruno and Tom Vanhove are sextuplet brothers, who have been part of the national goalball program for about ten years. Three of the sextuplets, including Bruno and Tom, are visually impaired. When playing, Bruno can throw the ball at speeds of up to 60 km/hour, while Tom can throw the ball at just under 55 km/hour.

Last month, with all but one of the same roster scheduled to compete at the World Championships, the national team competed at the Belgian-hosted Parantee Paralympic Championships. They lost to Algeria 7–11, defeated Russia 11–5, lost to the United States 3–13, defeated the Netherlands 10–5, narrowly lost to Finland 5–6, and lost to Lithuania 6–13.

Goalball was created in 1946, exclusively for people with a visual disability and designed to help with the rehabilitation of veterans returning from World War II. Play in the Paralympics consists of two twelve-minute periods, with a three minute break between halves. Players are blindfolded to ensure all are equally visually handicapped on-court, and the game can be stopped to ensure goggles are properly fitted. Standing in front of a long goal, they throw the ball at the opposition team’s net who in turn try to block it by listening to the ball, which contains a bell, and using their bodies to prevent the ball from going in. The audience is asked to remain silent during play.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 3, 2014

Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie

Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, January 3, 2014

Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Preston, Victoria, Australia — On Saturday, Wikinews interviewed Tina McKenzie, a former member of the Australia women’s national wheelchair basketball team, known as the Gliders. McKenzie, a silver and bronze Paralympic medalist in wheelchair basketball, retired from the game after the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London. Wikinews caught up with her in a cafe in the leafy Melbourne suburb of Preston.

Tina McKenzie
Image: Australian Paralympic Committee.

Tina McKenzie: [The Spitfire Tournament in Canada] was a really good tournament actually. It was a tournament that I wish we’d actually gone back to more often.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Who plays in that one?

Tina McKenzie: It’s quite a large Canadian tournament, and so we went as the Gliders team. So we were trying to get as many international games as possible. ‘Cause that’s one of our problems really, to compete. It costs us so much money to for us to travel overseas and to compete internationally. And so we can compete against each other all the time within Australia but we really need to be able to…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It’s not the same.

Tina McKenzie: No, it’s really not, so it’s really important to be able to get as a many international trips throughout the year to continue our improvement. Also see where all the other teams are at as well. But yes, Spitfire was good. We took quite a few new girls over there back then in 2005, leading into the World Cup in the Netherlands.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Was that the one where you were the captain of the team, in 2005? Or was that a later one?

Tina McKenzie: No, I captained in 2010. So 2009, 2010 World Cup. And then I had a bit of some time off in 2011.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The Gliders have never won the World Championship.

Tina McKenzie: We always seem to have just a little bit of a chill out at the World Cup. I don’t know why. It’s really strange occurrence, over the years. 2002 World Cup, we won bronze. Then in 2006 we ended up fourth. It was one of the worst World Cups we’ve played actually. And then in 2010 we just… I don’t know what happened. We just didn’t play as well as we thought we would. Came fourth. But you know what? Fired us up for the actual Paralympics. So the World Cup is… it’s good to be able to do well at the World Cup, to be placed, but it also means that you get a really good opportunity to know where you’re at in that two year gap between the Paralympics. So you can come back home and revisit what you need to do and, you know, where the team’s at. And all that sort of stuff.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Unfortunately, they are talking about moving it so it will be on the year before the Paralympics.

Tina McKenzie: Oh really.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The competition from the [FIFA] World Cup and all.

Tina McKenzie: Right. Well, that would be sad.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png But anyway, it is on next year, in June. In Toronto, and they are playing at the Maple Leaf Gardens?

Tina McKenzie: Okay. I don’t know where that is.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I don’t know either!

Tina McKenzie: (laughs)

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png We’ll find it. The team in Bangkok was pretty similar. There’s two — yourself and Amanda Carter — who have retired. Katie Hill wasn’t selected, but they had Kathleen O’Kelly-Kennedy back, so there was ten old players and only two new ones.

Tina McKenzie: Which is a good thing for the team. The new ones would have been Georgia [Inglis] and?

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Caitlin de Wit.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah… Shelley Cronau didn’t get in?

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png No, she’s missed out again.

Tina McKenzie: Interesting.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png That doesn’t mean that she won’t make the team…

Tina McKenzie: You never know.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You never know until they finally announce it.

Tina McKenzie: You never know what happens. Injuries happen leading into… all types of things and so… you never know what the selection is like.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They said to me that they expected a couple of people to get sick in Bangkok. And they did.

Tina McKenzie: It’s pretty usual, yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They sort of budgeted for three players each from the men’s and women’s teams to be sick.

Tina McKenzie: Oh really? And that worked out?

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Yeah. I sort of took to counting the Gliders like sheep so I knew “Okay, we’ve only go ten, so who’s missing?”

Tina McKenzie: I heard Shelley got sick.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png She was sick the whole time. And Caitlin and Georgia were a bit off as well.

Tina McKenzie: It’s tough if you haven’t been to Asian countries as well, competing and…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The change of diet affects some people.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah. I remember when we went to Korea and…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When was that?

Tina McKenzie: Korea would have been qualifiers in two thousand and… just before China, so that would have been…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png 2007 or 2008?

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, 2007. Maybe late, no, it might have been early 2007. It was a qualifier for — Beijing, I think actually. Anyway, we went and played China, China and Japan. And it was a really tough tournament on some of our really new girls. They really struggled with the food. They struggled with the environment that we were in. It wasn’t a clean as what they normally exist in. A lot of them were very grumpy. (laughs) It’s really hard when you’re so used to being in such a routine, and you know what you want to eat, and you’re into a tournament and all of a sudden your stomach or your body can’t take the food and you’re just living off rice, and that’s not great for anyone.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Yeah, well, the men are going to Seoul for their world championship, while the women go to Toronto. And of course the next Paralympics is in Rio.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I know.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It will be a very different climate and very different food.

Tina McKenzie: We all learn to adjust. I have over the years. I’ve been a vegetarian for the last thirteen years. Twelve years maybe. So you learn to actually take food with you. And you learn to adjust, knowing what environment you’re going in to, and what works for you. I have often carried around cans of red kidney beans. I know that I can put that in lettuce or in salad and get through with a bit of protein. And you know Sarah Stewart does a terrific job being a vegan, and managing the different areas and countries that we’ve been in to. Germany, for example, is highly dependent on the meat side of food, and I’m pretty sure I remember in Germany I lived on pasta and spaghetti. Tomato sauce. Yeah, that was it. (laughs) That’s alright. You just learn. I think its really hard for the new girls that come in to the team. It’s so overwhelming at the best of times anyway, and their nerves are really quite wracked I’d say, and that different travel environment is really hard. So I think the more experience they can get in traveling and playing internationally, the better off they’ll be for Rio.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png One of the things that struck me about the Australian team — I hadn’t seen the Gliders before London. It was an amazing experience seeing you guys come out on the court for the first time at the Marshmallow…

Tina McKenzie: (laughs)

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It was probably all old hat to you guys. You’d been practicing for months. Certainly since Sydney in July.

Tina McKenzie: It was pretty amazing, yeah. I think it doesn’t really matter how many Paralympics you actually do, being able to come out on that court, wherever it is, it’s never dull. It’s always an amazing experience, and you feel quite honored, and really proud to be there and it still gives you a tingle in your stomach. It’s not like “oh, off I go. Bored of this.”

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Especially that last night there at the North Greenwich Arena. There were thirteen thousand people there. They opened up some extra parts of the stadium. I could not even see the top rows. They were in darkness.

Tina McKenzie: It’s an amazing sport to come and watch, and its an amazing sport to play. It’s a good spectator sport I think. People should come and see especially the girls playing. It’s quite tough. And I was talking to someone yesterday and it was like “Oh I don’t know how you play that! You know, it’s so rough. You must get so hurt.” It’s great! Excellent, you know? Brilliant game that teaches you lots of strategies. And you can actually take all those strategies off the court and into your life as well. So it teaches you a lot of discipline, a lot of structure and… it’s a big thing. It’s not just about being on the court and throwing a ball around.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When I saw you last you were in Sydney and you said you were moving down to Melbourne. Why was that?

Tina McKenzie: To move to Melbourne? My mum’s down here. And I lived here for sixteen years or something.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I know you lived here for a long time, but you moved up to Sydney. Did your teacher’s degree up there.

Tina McKenzie: I moved to Sydney to go to uni, and Macquarie University were amazing in the support that they actually gave me. Being able to study and play basketball internationally, the scholarship really helped me out. And you know, it wasn’t just about the scholarship. It was.. Deidre Anderson was incredible. She’s actually from Melbourne as well, but her support emotionally and “How are you doing?” when she’d run into you and was always very good at reading people… where they’re at. She totally understands at the levels of playing at national level and international level and so it wasn’t just about Macquarie supporting me financially, it was about them supporting me the whole way through. And that was how I got through my degree, and was able to play at that level for such a long time.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And you like teaching?

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I do. Yeah, I do. I’m still waiting on my transfer at the moment from New South Wales to Victoria, but teaching’s good. It’s really nice to be able to spend some time with kids and I think its really important for kids to be actually around people with disabilities to actually normalize us a little bit and not be so profound about meeting someone that looks a little bit different. And if I can do that at a young age in primary school and let them see that life’s pretty normal for me, then I think that’s a really important lesson.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You retired just after the Paralympics.

Tina McKenzie: I did. Yeah. Actually, it took me quite a long time to decide to do that. I actually traveled after London. So I backpacked around… I went to the USA and then to Europe. And I spent a lot of time traveling and seeing amazing new things, and spending time by myself, and reflecting on… So yes, I got to spend quite a bit of time reflecting on my career and where I wanted to go.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Your basketball career or your teaching career?

Tina McKenzie: All the above. Yeah. Everything realistically. And I think it was a really important time for me to sort of decide sort of where I wanted to go in myself. I’d spent sixteen years with the Gliders. So that’s a long time to be around the Gliders apparently.

Tina McKenzie (No. 8, at right) listens to the Australian national anthem prior to the match against the United States at the 2012 Summer Paralympics
Image: Laura Hale.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When did you join them for the first time?

Tina McKenzie: I think it was ’89? No, no, no, sorry, no, no, no, ’98. We’ll say 1998. Yeah, 1998 was my first tournament, against USA. So we played USA up in New South Wales in the Energy Australia tour. So we traveled the coast. Played up at Terrigal. It was a pretty amazing experience, being my first time playing for Australia and it was just a friendly competition so… Long time ago. And that was leading into 2000, into the big Sydney Olympics. That was the beginning of an amazing journey realistically. But going back to why I retired, or thinking about retiring, I think when I came home I decided to spend a little bit more time with mum. Cause we’d actually lost my dad. He passed away two years ago. He got really sick after I came back from World Cup, in 2011, late 2010, he was really unwell, so I spent a lot of time down here. I actually had a couple of months off from the Gliders because I needed to deal with the family. And I think that it was really good to be able to get back and get on the team and… I love playing basketball but after being away, and I’ve done three Paralympics, I’ve been up for four campaigns, I think its time now to actually take a step backwards and… Well not backwards… take a step out of it and spend quality time with mum and quality time with people that have supported me throughout the years of me not being around home but floating back in and floating out again and its a really… it’s a nice time for me to be able to also take on my teaching career and trying to teach and train and work full time is really hard work and I think its also time for quite a few of the new girls to actually step up and we’ve got quite a few… You’ve got Caitlin, and you’ve got Katie and you’ve got Shelley and Georgia. There’s quite a few nice girls coming through that will fit really well into the team and it’s a great opportunity for me to go. It’s my time now. See where they go with that, and retire from the Gliders. It was a hard decision. Not an easy decision to retire. I definitely miss it. But I think now I’d rather focus on maybe helping out at the foundation level of starting recruitment and building up a recruiting side in Melbourne and getting new girls to come along and play basketball. People with… doesn’t even have to be girls but just trying to re-feed our foundation level of basketball, and if I can do that now I think that’s still giving towards the Gliders and Rollers eventually. That would be really nice. Just about re-focusing. I don’t want to completely leave basketball. I’d still like to be part of it. Looking to the development side of things and maybe have a little bit more input in that area would be really nice though. Give back the skills I’ve been taught over the years and be a bit of an educator in that area I think would be nice. It’s really hard when you’re at that international level to… you’re so time poor that it’s really hard to be able to focus on all that recruitment and be able to give out skill days when you’re actually trying to focus on improving yourself. So now I’ve got that time that I could actually do that. Be a little bit more involved in mentoring maybe, something like that. Yeah, that’s what I’d like to do.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png That would be good.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah! That would be great, actually. So I’ve just been put on the board of Disability Sport and Recreation, which is the old Wheelchair Sports Victoria. So that’s been a nice beginning move. Seeing where all the sports are at, and what we’re actually facilitating in Victoria, considering I’ve been away from Victoria for so long. It’s nice to know where they’re all at.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Where are they all at?

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, dunno. They’re not very far at all. Victoria… I think Victoria is really struggling in the basketball world. Yeah, I think there’s a bit of a struggle. Back in the day… back in those old times, where Victoria would be running local comps. We’d have an A grade and a B grade on a Thursday night, and we’d have twelve teams in A grade and B grade playing wheelchair basketball. That’s a huge amount of people playing and when you started in B grade you’d be hoping that you came around and someone from A grade would ask you to come and play. So it was a really nice way to build your basketball skills up and get to know that community. And I think its really important to have a community, people that you actually feel comfortable and safe around. I don’t want to say it’s a community of disabled people. It’s actually…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It’s not really because…

Tina McKenzie: Well, it’s not. The community’s massive. It’s not just someone being in a chair. You’ve got your referees, you’ve got people that are coming along to support you. And it’s a beautiful community. I always remember Liesl calling it a family, and it’s like a family so… and it’s not just Australia-based. It’s international. It’s quite incredible. It’s really lovely. But it’s about providing that community for new players to come through. And you know, not every player that comes through to play basketball wants to be a Paralympian. So its about actually providing sport, opportunities for people to be physically active. And if they do want to compete for Australia and they’re good enough, well then we support that. But I think it’s really hard in the female side of things. There’s not as many females with a disability.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Yeah, they kept on pointing that out…

Tina McKenzie: It’s really hard, but I think one of the other things is that we also need to be able to get the sport out there into the general community. And it’s not just about having a disability, it’s about coming along and playing with your mate that might be classifiable or an ex-basketball player. Like I was talking to a friend of mine the other day and she’s six foot two…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Sounds like a basketball player already.

Tina McKenzie: She’s been a basketball player, an AB basketball player for years. Grew up playing over in Adelaide, and her knee is so bad that she can’t run anymore, and she can’t cycle, but yet wants to be physically active, and I’m like “Oooh, you can come along and play wheelchair basketball” and she’s like “I didn’t even think that I could do that!” So it’s about promoting. It not that you actually have to be full time in the chair, or being someone with an amputation or other congenitals like a spinal disability, it’s wear and tear on people’s bodies and such.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Something I noticed in the crowd in London. People seemed to think that they were in the chair all the time and were surprised when most of the Rollers got up out of their chairs at the end of the game.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Disability is a very complicated thing.

Tina McKenzie: It is, yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I was surprised myself at people who were always in a chair, but yet can wiggle their toes.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, it’s the preconceived thing, like if you see someone in a chair, a lot of people just think that nothing works, but in hindsight there are so many varying levels of disability. Some people don’t need to be in a chair all the time, sometimes they need to be in it occasionally. Yeah, it’s kind of a hard thing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Also talking to the classifiers and they mentioned the people playing [wheelchair] basketball who have no disability at all but are important to the different teams, that carry their bags and stuff.

Tina McKenzie: So important, yeah. It’s the support network and I think that when we started developing Women’s National League to start in 2000, one of the models that we took that off was the Canadian Women’s National League. They run an amazing national league with huge amounts of able bodied women coming in and playing it, and they travel all over Canada [playing] against each other and they do have a round robin in certain areas like our Women’s National League as well but it’s so popular over there that it’s hard to get on the team. They have a certain amount of women with disabilities and then other able bodied women that just want to come along and play because they see it as a really great sport. And that’s how we tried to model our Women’s National League off. It’s about getting many women just to play sport, realistically.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Getting women to play sport, whether disabled or not, is another story. And there seems to be a reluctance amongst women to participate in sports, particularly sports that they regard as being men’s sports.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, a masculine sport.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They would much rather play a sport that is a women’s sport.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, it’s really hard. I think it’s about just encouraging people, communicating, having a really nice welcoming, come and try day. We run a… like Sarah [Stewart] actually this yeah will be running the women’s festival of sport, which is on the 30th of January. And that’s an amazing tournament. That actually started from club championship days, where we used to run club championships. And then the club championships then used to feed in to our Women’s National League. Club championships used to about getting as many women to come along and play whether they’re AB or have a disability. It’s just about participation. It’ll be a really fun weekend. And it’s a pretty easy weekend for some of us.

Tina McKenzie (No. 8, at right) on the court in the quarter final against Mexico
Image: Laura Hale.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Where is it?

Tina McKenzie: Next year, in 2014, it’ll be January the 30th at Narrabeen. We hold it every year. And last year we got the goalball girls to come along and play. So we had half of the goalball girls come and play for the weekend and they had an absolute brilliant time. Finding young girls that are walking down the street that just want to come and play sport. Or they have a friend at high school that has a disability. And it’s just about having a nice weekend, meeting other people that have disabilities or not have disabilities and just playing together. It’s a brilliant weekend. And every year we always have new faces come along and we hope that those new faces stay around and enjoy the weekend. Because it’s no so highly competitive, it’s just about just playing. Like last year I brought three or four friends of mine, flew up from Melbourne, ABs, just to come along and play. It was really nice that I had the opportunity to play a game of basketball with the friends that I hang out with. Which was really nice. So the sport’s not just Paralympics.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How does Victoria compare with New South Wales?

Tina McKenzie: Oh, that’s a thing to ask! (laughs) Look I think both states go in highs and lows, in different things. I think all the policies that have been changing in who’s supporting who and… like, Wheelchair Sports New South Wales do a good job at supporting the basketball community. Of course, there’s always a willingness for more money to come in but they run a fairly good support and so does the New South Wales Institute of Sport. It’s definitely gotten better since I first started up there. And then, it’s really hard to compare because both states do things very differently. Yeah, really differently and I always remember being in Victoria… I dunno when that was… in early 2000. New South Wales had an amazing program. It seemed so much more supportive than what we had down here in Victoria. But then even going to New South Wales and seeing the program that they have up there, it wasn’t as brilliant as… the grass isn’t always greener on the other side, cause there there good things and there were weren’t so great things about the both programs in Victoria and in New South Wales so… The VIS [Victorian Institute of Sport] do some great support with some of the athletes down here, and NSWIS [New South Wales Instituted of Sport] are building and improving and I know their program’s changed quite a lot now with Tom [Kyle] and Ben [Osborne] being involved with NSWIS so I can’t really give feedback on how that program’s running but in short I know that when NSWIS employed Ben Osborne to come along and actually coach us as a basketball individual and as in group sessions it was the best thing that they ever did. Like, it was so good to be able to have one coach to actually go and go we do an individual session or when are you running group sessions and it just helped me. It helped you train. It was just a really… it was beneficial. Whereas Victoria don’t have that at the moment. So both states struggle some days. I mean, back in 2000 Victoria had six or seven Gliders players, and then New South Wales had as many, and then it kind of does a big swap. It depends on what the state infrastructure is, what the support network is, and how local comps are running, how the national league’s running, and it’s about numbers. It’s all about numbers.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png At the moment you’ll notice a large contingent of Gliders from Western Australia.

Tina McKenzie: Yes, yes, I have seen that, yeah. And that’s good because its… what happens is, someone comes along in either state, or wherever it may be, and they’re hugely passionate about building and improving that side of things and they have the time to give to it, and that’s what’s happened in WA [Western Australia]. Which has been great. Ben Ettridge has been amazing, and so has John. And then in New South Wales you have Gerry driving that years ago. Gerry has always been a hugely passionate man about improving numbers, about participation, and individuals’ improvement, you know? So he’s been quite a passionate man about making sure people are improving individually. And you know, Gerry Hewson’s been quite a driver of wheelchair basketball in New South Wales. He’s been an important factor, I think.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The news recently has been Basketball Australia taking over the running of things. The Gliders now have a full time coach.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, which is fantastic! That’s exciting. It’s a good professional move, you know? It’s nice to actually know that that’s what’s happening and I think that only will lead to improvement of all the girls, and the Gliders may go from one level up to the next level which is fantastic so… and Tom sounds like a great man so I really hope that he enjoys himself.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I’m sure he is.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I’ve done some work with Tom. He’s a good guy.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Did you do some work with him?

Tina McKenzie: Ah, well, no, I just went up to Brisbane a couple of times and did some development days. Played in one of their Australia Day tournaments with some of the developing girls that they have. We did a day camp leading into that. Went and did a bit of mentoring I guess. And it was nice to do that with Tom. That was a long time before Tom… I guess Tom had just started on the men’s team back them. He was very passionate about improving everyone, which he still is.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Watching the Gliders and the Rollers… with the Rollers, they can do it. With the Gliders… much more drama from the Gliders in London. For a time we didn’t even know if they were going to make the finals. Lost that game against Canada.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, that wasn’t a great game. No. It was pretty scary. But, you know, we always fight back. In true Gliders style. Seems to be… we don’t like to take the easy road, we like to take the hard road, sometimes.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Apparently.

Tina McKenzie: It’s been a well-known thing. I don’t know why it is but it just seems to happen that way.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You said you played over 100 [international] games. By our count there was 176 before you went to London, plus two games there makes 178 international caps. Which is more than some teams that you played against put together.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, I thought I’d be up to nearly 200. Look, I think it’s an amazing thing to have that many games under your belt and the experience that’s gained me throughout the years, and you’ve got to be proud about it. Proud that I stayed in there and competed with one of the best teams in the world. I always believed that the Gliders can be the best in the world but…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You need to prove it.

Tina McKenzie: Need to get there. Just a bit extra.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Before every game in London there was an announcement that at the World Championships and the Paralympics “they have never won”.

Tina McKenzie: No, no. I remember 2000 in Sydney, watching the girls play against Canada in 2000. Terrible game. Yet they were a brilliant team in 2000 as well. I think the Gliders have always had a great team. Just unfortunately, that last final game. We haven’t been able to get over that line yet.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You were in the final game in 2004.

Tina McKenzie: Yep, never forget that. It was an amazing game.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What was it like?

Tina McKenzie: I think we played our gold medal game against the USA the first game up. We knew that we had to beat USA that day, that morning. It was 8am in the morning, maybe 8:30 in the morning and it was one of the earliest games that we played and we’d been preparing for this game knowing that we had to beat USA to make sure that our crossovers would be okay, and knew that we’d sit in a really good position against the rest of the teams that we would most likely play. And I think that being my first ever Paralympic Games it was unforgettable. I think I’ll never, not forget it. The anticipation, adrenalin and excitement. And also being a little bit scared sometimes. It was really an amazing game. We did play really, really well. We beat America by maybe one point I think that day. So we played a tough, tough game. Then we went into the gold medal game… I just don’t think we had much left in our energy fuel. I think it was sort of… we knew that we had to get there but we just didn’t have enough to get over the line, and that was really unfortunate. And it was really sad. It was sad that we knew that we could actually beat America, but at the end of the day the best team wins.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The best team on the court on the day.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, absolutely. And that can change any day. It depends where your team’s at. What the ethos is like. and so it’s… Yeah, I don’t think you can actually say that every team’s gonna be on top every day, and it’s not always going to be that way. I’m hoping the Gliders will put it all together and be able to take that way through and get that little gold medal. That would be really nice. Love to see that happen.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I’d like to see that happen. I’d really like to see them win. In Toronto, apparently, because the Canadian men are not in the thing, the Canadians are going to be focusing on their women’s team. They apparently didn’t take their best team and their men were knocked out by Columbia or Mexico or something like that.

Tina McKenzie: Wow.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And in the women’s competition there’s teams like Peru. But I remember in London that Gliders were wrong-footed by Brazil, a team that they had never faced before. Nearly lost that game.

Tina McKenzie: (laughs) Oh yes. Brazil were an unknown factor to us. So they were quite unknown. We’d done a bit of scouting but if you’ve never played someone before you get into an unknown situation. We knew that they’d be quite similar players to Mexico but you know what? Brazil had a great game. They had a brilliant game. We didn’t have a very good game at all. And it’s really hard going into a game that you know that you need to win unbeknown to what all these players can do. You can scout them as much as you want but it’s actually about being on court and playing them. That makes a huge difference. I think one of the things here in Australia is that we play each other so often. We play against each other so often in the Women’s National League. We know exactly what… I know that Shelley Chaplin is going to want to go right and close it up and Cobi Crispin is going to dive underneath the key and do a spin and get the ball. So you’ve actually… you know what these players want to do. I know that Kylie Gauci likes to double screen somewhere, and she’ll put it in, and its great to have that knowledge of what your players really like to do when you’re playing with them but going into a team like Brazil we knew a couple of the players, what they like to do but we had no idea what their speed was like or what their one-pointers were going to do. Who knows? So it was a bit of an unknown.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They’ll definitely be an interesting side when it comes to Rio.

Tina McKenzie: I think they’ll be quite good. And that happened with China. I’ll always remember seeing China when we were in Korea for the first time and going “Wow, these girls can hardly move a chair” but some of them could shoot, and they went from being very fresh players to going into China as quite a substantial team, and then yet again step it up again in London. And they’re a good team. I think its really important as not to underestimate any team at a Paralympics or at a World Cup. I mean, Netherlands have done that to us over and over again.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They’re a tough team too.

Tina McKenzie: They’re a really tough team and they’re really unpredictable sometimes. Sometimes when they’re on, they’re on. They’re tough. They’re really tough. And they’ve got a little bit of hunger in them now. Like, they’re really hungry to be the top team. And you can see that. And I remember seeing that in Germany, in Beijing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The Germans lost to the Americans in the final in Beijing.

Tina McKenzie: Yes. Yeah, they did.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And between 2008 and 2012 all they talked about was the US, and a rematch against the US. But of course when it came to London, they didn’t face the US at all, because you guys knocked the US out of the competition.

Tina McKenzie: Yeah, we did. It was great. A great game that.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You won by a point.

Tina McKenzie: Fantastic. Oh my God I came. Still gives me heart palpitations.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It went down to a final shot. There was a chance that the Americans would win the thing with a shot after the siren. Well, a buzzer-beater.

Tina McKenzie: Tough game. Tough game. That’s why you go to the Paralympics. You have those tough, nail-biting games. You hope that at the end of the day that… Well, you always go in as a player knowing that you’ve done whatever you can do.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Thankyou very much for this.

Tina McKenzie: That’s alright. No problems at all!



Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 15, 2013

Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font

Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Deborah Font at Madrid–Barajas Airport on Friday
Image: Laura Hale.

Wikinews interviews Deborah Font
Audio: Laura Hale.

Thursday, August 15, 2013

Last Friday at Madrid–Barajas Airport, Wikinews interviewed Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font, who is competing at the 2013 IPC Swimming World Championships that started this Monday in Montreal, Canada. Font has finished second in Monday’s Women’s 100 meter Freestyle S12 Heat 1, before going on to finish fourth in the Women’s 100 meter Freestyle S12 Final with a time of 1:03.20, less than a second behind bronze medalist German Naomi Maike Schnittger.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png I’m Laura Hale, I’m interviewing Deborah Font for Wikinews. Deborah is going to the 2013 IPC Swimming World Championships in Montreal. You’re already a Paralympic medallist, right? You’ve won several medals at the Paralympics before?

Deborah Font: I won two medals in Sydney [2000 Summer Paralympic Games], a gold medal and bronze medal; in Athens [2004 Summer Paralympic Games] two silver medals and one bronze medal; in Beijing [2008 Summer Paralympic Games] one bronze medal; and in London 2012 Summer Paralympic Games one bronze medal. Seven in Paralympic Games.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And in World Championships?

Deborah Font: I don’t know the exact number. Several.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What style do you swim?

Deborah Font: 400m freestyle.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Okay, and you’re going to do that in Montreal?

Deborah Font: In Montreal I’ll do 400m freestyle.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You think you’re going to get a medal?

Deborah Font: Yes, I’m fighting for a silver or bronze medal.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What classification are you?

Deborah Font: S-12.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png S-12. So you have partial vision.

Deborah Font: Yeah, partial. [I can see a little.]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Since you cannot see perfectly, when you swim, can you see the people next to you?

Deborah Font: I can see those next to me, but not perfectly. I see those near to me, but not those far from me.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think about other swimmers when you swim, or is it a disadvantage because you cannot see swimmers farther away?

Deborah Font: I swim my race, and don’t see the other swimmers.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They don’t matter when you swim? You swim against yourself, your best time?

Deborah Font: I swim against myself, I don’t see the other swimmers too much. My race, myself, I go inside myself.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you have any sponsors?

Deborah Font: No, no sponsors.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How difficult is it to swim in Spain for Paralympic swimmers when you don’t have sponsors?

Deborah Font: We have a Paralympic Committee. It’s difficult having sponsors in Spain. For the Olympics, athletes don’t have many sponsors, and for Paralympics it’s more difficult.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Where are you from?

Deborah Font: Barcelona.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Is swimming more competitive in Barcelona, in Madrid…? Where do you think the best swimmers come from?

Deborah Font: They come from all Spain, but train only in Madrid or Barcelona. Most in Barcelona. (laughs)

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Is there a reason most of the swimmers train in Barcelona?

Deborah Font: There are more possibilities for training in good swimming pools. The “Centros de Alto Rendimiento” [High Performance Centres] are in Madrid or Barcelona.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Coming in into the World Championships, did you do any special training, or change how you prepare?

Deborah Font: I did special training with a coach that only trains three or four of us at the High Performance Centre.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png This is a pretty dumb question, but I know a lot of people who look at blind swimmers and they go how can they swim at a straight line? Can you clarify how people with vision impairments can actually swim?

Deborah Font: Well, in swimming it’s all technique and a lot of learning, and learning to swim by the middle of the lane involves a lot of training, habit… Perhaps it’s more difficult for completely blind people, but it’s all a matter of training, trying again and again, get to know the swimming pool… But I think the most difficult thing is to learn to swim the technique without being able to see the others, and to know what you are moving, your arm here and not there… and learning to touch the wall, it’s harder to calculate, especially when competing, because you cannot see the distance you have to the wall.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Thank you very much!



Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

External Links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 11, 2013

Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Wikinews interviews Marta Gomez.
Image: Laura Hale.

Marta Gomez at Madrid–Barajas Airport yesterday
Image: Laura Hale.

Sunday, August 11, 2013

Thursday at Madrid–Barajas Airport, Wikinews interviewed Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gomez, who is scheduled to compete at the 2013 IPC Swimming World Championships that start on Monday in Montreal, Canada.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png This is Laura Hale, I’m interviewing Marta Gómez, a Spanish Paralympic swimmer going to the 2013 IPC Swimming World Championships in Montreal. Are you going to Montreal and what strokes and distances are you competing in?

Marta Gomez : I’ll swim the 100 meter and 400 freestyle, and the 200 individual medley.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Have you won any medals at previous championships?((es))

Marta Gomez : In 2011, at the European Championships in Berlin, I won 3 bronze.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think you will win any medals in Montreal?((es))

Marta Gomez : I will try to fight for a medal in the 400 freestyle which is my main event, but, well, [if I swim well and feel well] my options are clearer, but until you swim nothing is clear.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You’ve competed at previous Paralympic Games? In London?

Marta Gomez : Yes.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And you didn’t win any medals?

Marta Gomez : No, I didn’t win any medals.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What’s the difference preparing for London to the World Championships?((es))

Marta Gomez : That I have improved many aspects of technical level [like?] performance, and especially the psychological aspect that after London I have faced other competitions and I feel much more confident about myself and I have become more competitive.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you a swimmer with a visual impediment? You cannot see…?((es))

Marta Gomez : S13.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When you swim, can you see the swimmers next to you?((es))

Marta Gomez : Depending on the race, you will always be able to — some races like in short distances like the 100 meter breaststroke and 100 meter freestyle as it is too short to lose sight of your rivals, but for example in 400 meters, yes, but I can only see from the sides. I cannot see all the swimmers. In the 800 meters, seeing swimmers in the race is impossible: I fail to see them.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When you swim, do you mostly think about your own race because you cannot fully see everyone? Do you race more against yourself because you can not see?((es))

Marta Gomez : Yes, of course. Not being able to see your rivals you have to concentrate on your event because you may have nobody to [watch?], you may have a slight reference but you have to swim against yourself.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Why did you choose swimming as opposed to athletics or Goalball or some other sport?

Marta Gomez : I have only practiced swimming since childhood, I’ve always liked the water and it’s been the only sport I’ve practiced because I think it’s a sport where you feel a lot of freedom and don’t have any architectural barriers or anything.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Gracías.((en))

Marta Gomez : De nada.((en))



Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

External Links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 24, 2013

Team USA delivers going into third day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

Team USA delivers going into third day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Going into the third scheduled day of competition at the IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain yesterday, the United States para-alpine team has delivered with a gold medal won by Laurie Stephens in the women’s sitting downhill, a silver medal won by men’s sit skier Stephen Lawler in the downhill, and bronze medal won by Laurie Stephens in the women’s sitting Super-G. The United States finished two days of competition fifth overall in the medal count, tied with Russia.

Other Team USA performances in the downhill included a fourth place finish by visually impaired woman skier Danelle Umstead and guide Robert Umstead, a fifth place finish by Christopher Devlin-Young in the men’s sitting group, an eighth place finish by Ralph Green in the men’s standing group, an eighth place finish by women’s standing skier Allison Jones, a ninth place finish by visually impaired Mark Bathum and guide Sean Ramsden, a tenth place finish by Tyler Walker in the men’s sitting, and a thirteenth place finish by Heath Calhoun in the men’s sitting.

In the Super-G event on Thursday, Jones finished fourth in the women’s standing group, Devlin-Young finished fifth, Stephani Victor finished fourth in the women’s sitting group, Umstead and Umstead finished fifth in their group, Bathum and Ramsden finished seventh in their group, Walker finished twelfth in his group, Green finished sixteenth in the men’s standing, Jonathan Lujan finished nineteenth in the men’s standing, Stephen Lawler finished twentieth in the men’s sitting, Heath Calhoun finished twenty-third in men’s sitting, and Andrew Earl Kurka finished twenty-fifth in the men’s sitting group.

A few members of Team USA had difficulties, and were not able to start or finish their races. In the men’s sitting downhill, Kurka did not finish. In the downhill and Super-G event, 2010 Winter Paralympics medalist Alana Nichols did not start. LW12-2 women’s sit-skier Victor also did not start in the downhill event.

Visually-impaired B3 classified skier Bathum chatted with his guide, Sean Ramsden, immediately following both his races. While he was unhappy with his downhill run, Bathum was happy with and had fun during his seventh place run in the Super-G event where he finished with a factored time of 1:13.51, only 3.02 seconds slower than the winning time set by Spanish skier Jon Santacana.

United States skiers were scheduled to compete yesterday in the Slalom discipline but the competition was cancelled due to high winds. Several members of Team USA had a pizza party after the slalom cancellation. Friday’s scheduled event had been rescheduled as a result of predicted snow and high winds during the day. No snow arrived until late in the afternoon, where there was limited accumulation. Some of the younger members of Team USA took advantage of the night off on Thursday to go bowling before a busy training day Friday.

In other United States Paralympic news, Sir Philip Craven, the President of the International Paralympic Committee, told a Wikinews reporter the country will have live television coverage of the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. When a member of Team USA competing in La Molina was asked if they heard confirmation of this, they were unable to confirm. They did highlight the lack of United States media coverage was frustrating for fans wanting to follow the Games in London. According to the skier, many people he knew could only follow the Games by searching for video on sites like YouTube.

Women’s Super-G medal ceremony where Stephens, right, earned a bronze medal
Image: Raystorm.

Laurie Stephens in her gold medal downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Umstead and Umstead following Danelle’s Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Danelle Umstead coming to a stop following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Ralph Green following his Super-G run
Image: Raystorm.

Allison Jones in her downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Allison Jones coming to a stop following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Mark Bathum and his guide during their downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Bathum coming to a stop following his downhill ride
Image: Laura Hale.

Bathum and his guide discuss the race following their downhill ride
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor on course in her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor in the on course finishing area following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Close up of Stephani Victor
Image: Laura Hale.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 23, 2013

Team USA delivers going into third day of the IPC Alpine World Championships

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Saturday, February 23, 2013

Going into the third scheduled day of competition at the IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain later today, the United States para-alpine team has delivered with a gold medal won by Laurie Stephens in the women’s standing downhill, a silver medal won by men’s sit skier Stephen Lawler in the downhill, and bronze medal won by Laurie Stephens in the women’s standing Super-G. The United States finished two days of competition fifth overall in the medal count, tied with Russia.

Other Team USA performances in the downhill included a fourth place finish by visually impaired woman skier Danelle Umstead and guide Robert Umstead, a fifth place finish by Christopher Devlin-Young in the men’s sitting group, an eighth place finish by Ralph Green in the men’s standing group, an eighth place finish by women’s standing skier Allison Jones, a ninth place finish by visually impaired Mark Bathum and guide Sean Ramsden, a tenth place finish by Tyler Walker in the men’s sitting, and a thirteenth place finish by Heath Calhoun in the men’s sitting.

In the Super-G event on Thursday, Jones finished fourth in the women’s standing group, Devlin-Young finished fifth, Stephani Victor finished fourth in the women’s sitting group, Umstead and Umstead finished fifth in their group, Bathum and Ramsden finished seventh in their group, Walker finished twelfth in his group, Green finished sixteenth in the men’s standing, Jonathan Lujan finished nineteenth in the men’s standing, Stephen Lawler finished twentieth in the men’s sitting, Heath Calhoun finished twenty-third in men’s sitting, and Andrew Earl Kurka finished twenty-fifth in the men’s sitting group.

A few members of Team USA had issues, and were not able to start or finish their races. In the men’s sitting downhill, Kurka did not finish in the downhill. In the downhill and Super-G event, 2010 Winter Paralympics medalist Alana Nichols did not start. LW12-2 women’s sit-skier Victor also did not start in the downhill event.

Visually-impaired B3 classified skier Bathum chatted with his guide, Sean Ramsden, immediately following both his races. While he was unhappy with his downhill run, Bathum was happy with and had fun during his seventh place run in the Super-G event where he finished with a factored time of 1:13.51, only 3.02 seconds slower than the winning time set by Spanish skier Jon Santacana.

United States skiers were scheduled to compete later today in the Slalom discipline but the competition was cancelled due to high winds. Several members of Team USA had a pizza party after the slalom cancellation. Yesterday’s scheduled event had been rescheduled as a result of predicted snow and high wnds during the day. No snow arrived until late in the afternoon, where there was limited accumulation. Some of the younger members of Team USA took advantage of the night off on Thursday to go bowling before a busy training day yesterday.

In other United States Paralympic news, Sir Philip Craven, the President of the International Paralympic Committee, told a Wikinews reporter that the country will have live television coverage of the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. When a member of Team USA competing in La Molina was asked if they heard confirmation of this, they were unable to confirm. They did highlight the lack of United States media coverage was frustrating for fans wanting to follow the Games in London. According to the skier, many people he knew could only follow the Games by searching for video on sites like YouTube.

Women’s Super-G medal ceremony where Stephens, right, earned a bronze medal
Image: Raystorm.

Laurie Stephens in her gold medal downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Umstead and Umstead following Danelle’s Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Danelle Umstead coming to a stop following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Ralph Green following his Super-G run
Image: Raystorm.

Allison Jones in her downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Allison Jones coming to a stop following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Mark Bathum and his guide during their downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Bathum coming to a stop following his downhill ride
Image: Laura Hale.

Bathum and his guide discuss the race following their downhill ride
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor on course in her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor in the on course finishing area following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Close up of Stephani Victor
Image: Laura Hale.



Related news

  • “Austria leads medal count after second day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships” — Wikinews, February 22, 2013
  • “Spain starts 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships with first and fifth place finishes” — Wikinews, February 20, 2013
  • “Spaniard Jon Santacana wins downhill at 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships” — Wikinews, February 20, 2013
  • “Slovak Henrieta Farkašová wins downhill event at 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships” — Wikinews, February 20, 2013

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 15, 2013

Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius charged with girlfriend\’s murder

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, February 15, 2013

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Oscar Pistorius murder charge

Pistorius at the 2011 World Championships in Athletics.
Image: Erik van Leeuwen.

South African police took Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius, 26, into custody last Thursday and charged him with the murder of Reeva Steenkamp, South African model.

Steenkamp, 29, a model and recent contestant on television series Tropika Island of Treasure 5, reportedly was his girlfriend. Police said she was found dead at his residence, the victim of multiple gunshots. Police were called to Mr. Pistorius’s residence early Thursday morning. By the time local authorities arrived, emergency workers were already on scene attempting to revive the victim. Police recovered a 9mm handgun at the runner’s residence. Pistorius told investigator’s that the shooting was an accident because he had mistaken the victim for an intruder.

Pistorius’s earlier court date on Thursday had to be delayed until Friday morning, in order to give investigators time to complete their investigation. Investigators said any request for bail would opposed.

Following his arrest the International Paralympic Committee stated, “Following the news of the alleged shooting incident involving South African athlete Oscar Pistorius this morning, the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) will not comment on the case at this time. This is a police matter, with a formal investigation currently underway. Therefore it would be inappropriate for the (IPC) to comment on this incident until the official police process has concluded. The IPC would like to offer its deepest sympathy and condolences to all families involved in this case.”

Pistorius who is best known as the first double amputee to appear in Olympic games history. Pistorius is known by the nickname Blade Runner. This is because he uses carbon fiber blades to compete. This a result of him having both legs amputated when he was only 11 months old.

He won gold in the 400m and the 4x400m relay at the Paralympic Games. In 2012 Time Magazine named him as one of the world’s 100 most influential people.



Related news

Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 14, 2013

Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius charged with the murder of his girlfriend

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Pistorius at the 2011 World Championships in Athletics

Olympic athlete Oscar Pistorius, 26, was taken into custody by police on Thursday February 14, 2013, and charged with the murder of a woman identified as Reeva Steenkamp.

Steenkamp, 30, a model and recent contestant on Tropika Island of Treasure 5, who is believed to be his girlfriend. Ms. Steenkamp was found dead at his home in South Africa’s capital, Pretoria. She had been the victim of an apparent gunshot.

Officers received a call in the early hours of the morning that there had been a shooting at the double-amputee runner’s home in a gated housing complex. When police arrived they found paramedics trying to revive the woman, who had been shot. A 9mm pistol was also found at the home. Pistorius told the police that the shooting was an accident and that he had mistaken the victim for an intruder.

Pistorius was due at Pretoria Magistrate’s Court this afternoon on a murder charge, but his appearance had been delayed until Friday morning to give forensic officers time to carry out their work. Police also stated they would oppose bail when the Pistorius appears in court. Police have not release the woman’s name, but the publicist for Reeva Steenkamp, stated that Steenkamp had died. And this was also reported by Many South African media outlets.

Cquote1.svg Police had responded previously to complaints of a “domestic nature” at the runner’s home but declined to give further details. Cquote2.svg

—Brigadier Denise Beukes, Police Spokeswoman

Following his arrest the International Paralympic Committee released the following statement

“Following the news of the alleged shooting incident involving South African athlete Oscar Pistorius this morning, the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) will not be passing any comment on the case at this time.

This is a police matter, with a formal investigation currently underway. Therefore it would be inappropriate for the IPC to comment on this incident until the official police process has concluded. The IPC would like to offer its deepest sympathy and condolences to all families involved in this case.”

Pistorius, Who is known as the “Blade Runner”, made history in 2012 when he became the first double amputee to compete in the Olympics.

He won gold in the 400m and the 4x400m relay at the Paralympic Games.The athlete had both legs amputated below the knee when he was 11 months old, because of a congenital condition, and runs on carbon fiber blades. In 2012 Time Magazine named him as one of the world’s 100 most influential people.



See also

Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 19, 2013

Wikinews interviews Spain\’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales

Wikinews interviews Spain’s most decorated Paralympian, Teresa Perales

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Saturday, January 19, 2013

Zaragoza, Spain — On Thursday, Wikinews traveled to Zaragoza, Spain to interview the nation’s most decorated Paralympian and IPC Athlete Council representative Teresa Perales. A wide range of topics about the Paralympics and sport in Spain were discussed including the evolution of Paralympic sport, disability sport classification, funding support across all levels of elite sport including the Paralympics and Olympics, the role of sportspeople in politics, sponsorship issues, and issues of gender in Spanish sport.

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Teresa Perales

Evolution of the Paralympics[]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Hi this is Laura Hale and I’m interviewing Teresa Perales (Raystorm translating), the most decorated Spanish paralympian of all time, and we’re in Zaragoza. And you’re from Zaragoza, right?

Teresa Perales in Zaragoza on Thursday
Image: LauraHale.

Teresa Perales :Yes, I’m from Zaragoza.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngSo, are you confident that Madrid is going to get the 2020, and are you going to stay around?

Teresa Perales : (laughs) I’d love to. I participated in the bid for Madrid 2016. It was a pity we didn’t get them, and I hope now it is our chance. But I don’t think I will be competing in them.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngYou first competed in 2000. Has there been a big change from 2000 to London that you’ve noticed like in terms of the atmosphere, or even the level of sport and issues of classification?

Teresa Perales : Yes, especially in the level of sport. Our sport is more professional, there are more countries that dedicate more resources, and it is much more professional than in 2000. I’ve seen an evolution, in Sydney times that were gold medal now didn’t make it to the finals. Another very important change has been the media coverage, at an international level and specially in Spain. Here in Spain for the first time we’ve had more than 14 hours of daily coverage of the Games. We’ve had specific programmes and general coverage, and that has been completely different than in Beijing, Athens, Sydney and previous others. It’s been the first time that we’ve been featured in the main pages of newspapers and opened the first minutes of the tv news. Regarding organization, I don’t think there’s been much change. I think Sydney organised the Games wonderfully well. Athens wasn’t very good, at all. Beijing was amazing: the organization was A plus, volunteers were A plus, everyone was A plus. It was fantastic. And London was like… I’m now using a new term, which it no longer is integration or normalization, it is naturally. As in, now everyone does see us the same, just exactly like the Olympians. Not for our disabilities. The biggest change I’ve seen is how people look at me, for example, it now is: I’ve won 22 medals. I am the sportsperson with more medals in Spanish History. And this has been recognised at an institutional and social level. This year I will receive the Gran Cruz al Mérito Deportivo, the highest honor that a sportsperson can achieve in Spain. It never before had been conceded to a paralympic sportsperson, ever. Many national awards, which weren’t possible for sportspeople with disabilities, national awards from newspapers, associations, clubs or town halls. It’s a radical change.((es))

Sponsorship[]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngI went to London, and the quality of sport — you didn’t go there and say, that’s a person in a wheelchair. You went, fall down guy in a wheelchair, because the sport was so great. There was no embarrassment like the Olympics where they let the people from Lesotho swim in the pool. [The level of sport] was very equitable [at the Paralympics]. In Australia, there was discussion amongst the Paralympians with the issue of sponsorship because sport is becoming so elite. Do you think Paralympians should be getting sponsorship and on the same level that their able-bodied counterparts are?

Interior panorama of the London Aquatics Centre, one of the venues of the 2012 Paralympic Games.
Image: Alexander Kachkaev.

Teresa Perales : Of course. Yes, I hope, some day. Here in Spain… I don’t know well other countries, how they work, I know the financial recognition they get after the Games, but I don’t know the level of sponsorship the sportspeople have. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngYeah I was asking you about Spain, the Australians are why I asked.

Teresa Perales : Ah, ok. In Spain we have a law, which has to be improved, which is the Law on Patronage (“Ley del Mecenazgo”) which regulates the way in which companies sponsor a sportsperson or an event and receive tax deductions in exchange. For example, sponsoring the ADO Paralympian Plan. It’s a special plan for Olympians and a plan for Paralympians. The financial support for a Paralympian and for an Olympian is very different. The amount for a Paralympian is a tenth of that of an Olympian. For example, all my medals in London, which were a gold, three silvers and two bronzes, are financially equivalent to one Olympic bronze medal. Very different. Companies prefer to sponsor the event, the plan, before the sportsperson, because they receive more advantages for that. This is in the case of the Paralympians: for Olympians, it is more usual for companies to sponsor sportspeople. For Beijing and London I had a sponsor, Arena, the swimsuit brand, who gave me swimsuits to compete with. For London they gave me three. [Laughs]((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngIs there any difference between men and women?

Teresa Perales : Only in the financial support of the clubs. Of course, that doesn’t affect us because we do not get money from the clubs. For example, Mireia Belmonte has an ADO sponsorhip, a Federations sponsorship, and well now she has problems with her club because she wanted to get the same amount of money as the men, and so she left the club. But she gets money from three places: ADO, Federation, and club. In our case it’s ADO only.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngIn the US, the system is, you need sponsorship to get to the elite level. In Australia, the government funds Olympians and Paralympians equally. Like goalball players got 7,000 dollars each, so it is interesting to find out how Spain differs.

Teresa Perales : Yes, but then, here in Spain we have to make a disctintion: we have the ADO Paralympic Plan since 2005, and the first time we perceived money, rewards for medals and ADO Plan, was after Beijing. Very recently.((es))

Classification[]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngAs someone who watched the Paralympics, classification was a huge issue. Mallory Weggemann was an American [Paralympic swimmer] who got reclassified at the Games and the Americans were really upset, and the Australians have said classifiers have won them more medals than the athletes themselves. How important is classification for you and are you happy with the system that exists for swimming?

Teresa Perales : Well, since I am also a representative of the Athlete’s Council at the International Paralympic Committee, this is a topic we have discussed there. We think that it is important than in the Olympic year, especially in the last months, and above all during the Games, there should be no classifications. Exactly to avoid these cases, in which sportspeople go up a category or down a category, and mess up the ranking. There have been many cases, in Spain we’ve had cases of people losing a medal because of a reclassification. We are worried about that and by the way in which events, the places to hold the competition, are selected during the Paralympic Games. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngIn Atlanta it was really bad…

Teresa Perales : Yes, some even were unable to compete because they were not able to get to the place of the event.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngSome of the people with the Paralympic movement think understanding classification is key towards moving the Games forward, like how do you convey that to the public, how classification works, so when somebody sees you, an S5 swimmer, they go, ‘we got times like this, but the S1 swimmers, this, and I can’t see much of a difference’.

Teresa Perales : Yes, that is one of the problems we have. In fact, it is the biggest problem for having in the future an open class system, a system in which all classes were able to compete together. One of the issues that was being evaluated since before London had to do with the events, not the place but the event, for example 50m butterfly, why now yes and before no, or why before yes and now not? One of the systems proposed, to avoid events from having to disappear, is unifying several categories. In other words, to have one class, but open. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngLike skiiing?

Teresa Perales : Yes. It’s similar. Yes, yes, similar to that. They are thinking of doing something similar in swimming, athletics, cycling… in sports with many people. This arises because we have a limited number of people who can participate in the Games, which is 4,000. 4,200, total. It’s 10,000 Olympians, while we are 4,000. And this is an agreement with the Olympic Committee. The Paralympic Committee makes a deal with the Olympic Committee, and that’s why we cannot exceed 4,000, and why some events have to be eliminated. To eliminate events, there is the option to concentrate the classes. But there is a big problem, because the public would not understand me competing against a swimmer who is only missing a hand, because she would obviously beat me. Imagine that I really do beat her not because I arrive before her, but because my time, due to the correction percentages or whatever, is held to be the winner, even if however I came in last position. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngThat happened in cycling. Set a World Record, did not win a medal.

Teresa Perales : Yes, I know. Yes, but they have, like in ski. In ski what they do is, time goes slower depending in which category you are in, so that at the end it is the same. Then the public really see that the time is going down and they are seeing a timer, seeing the time slowing down, but at the end they are seeing the same time. Then they see who’s won because they can see the time. The problem happens in sports in which several of us compete simultaneously, eight lanes. It’s difficult to understand.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngHave you ever had any problems with in your career where they’ve said…?

Teresa Perales : No. At first I was in New Zealand, I was S6, and then in 2000? No, in 1999, in the European Championships, I was reclassified, and now I am S5, SB4, and SM5, because they saw my arm is not very good.((es))

Mixing sport and politics[]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngIn the US, there is a view that celebrities and sportspeople should stay out of politics because… they’re dumb.

Teresa Perales : [Laughs]. Okay, this doesn’t happen in Spain.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Should sportspeople be involved and do Paralympians especially, should they be more involved because of the nature of the sport they are doing in politics, and is it something in Spain and should be done elsewhere in the world… Should there be a call for more Paralympians in politics? Because you protested in Madrid…

Teresa Perales : Yes!((es))

Paralympic swimmer Teresa Perales with Miguel Carballeda; the president of the Spanish Paralympic Committee told IOC inspectors Madrid would stage the “greatest Paralympic Games ever.”
Image: Atr1992.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngAnd you were a politician.

Teresa Perales : I was, I was. [Laughs] No, I worked in politics, I really wasn’t a politician. I believe that when you want things to change, and when you believe that there is something that has to change, you need to be part of the change. And that’s why I entered politics. That’s why I think that it is important that people get involved in politics. And not only… In my case, I didn’t get in for sports politics, I got in for general politics, because I believed there were several things that could be improved or that should be changed, and that’s why I got in. And I believe that sportspeople are very qualified, because, let me give an example. Me, that I spend seven days a week, six hours every day training, seeing the floor and walls, I just can do whatever I want in this life.[Laughs] I know I am not going to go down in the dumps if I have a problem, because while training I know that things may not work out the first day, the second, the third, but someday they will, right? And that’s what sportspeople contribute to any job, and especially to politics. I defend what sportspeople can contribute, I’ve given conference talks on what a sportsperson can contribute to a company, and what a sportsperson can contribute to politics is the same because it is also a job and a company, right? It’s how to manage resources: I manage my resources every day to get the most out of me. I also manage my emotions, because I am a whole. I am a physical whole, but also an emotional whole. And I know I can make decisions in a matter of seconds. I do it every time I compete. My 50m event takes 35 seconds. It’s 35 seconds. Four years, seven days a week, six hours every day for 35 seconds. So I can make decisions and work really well in politics or in whatever I want to. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngBecause they are disabled, and the way society treats people with disabilities, sets Paralympians off from able-bodied athletes, does that make it special emphasis that they should be more engaged in the political process than someone like Michael Phelps?

Teresa Perales : Yes, because… I had something very clear when I worked in politics, and it’s that you cannot make policies without the people to whom they are directed. It’s necessary for the people to whom they are destined work in politics, because that will ensure they are right. If not, no. And the people with disabilities, especially sportspeople with disabilities, that we care least of all about the disabilities really, we’ve had to overcome so many things, that we are able to contribute so much more.((es))

Funding Spanish sport[]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngThe Spanish Paralympic Committee is supported primarily by the Government?

Teresa Perales : No, for us it is the Government and companies. Both do the ADO Paralympic Plan.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngDo they give you as an athlete the support that you need to be successful?

Teresa Perales : No. No, absolutely not. I don’t have a lane for swimming every day, only for me. I have to share it with other, not athletes, not swimmers, people, who come to the swimming pool and then swim, or try to swim. I cannot afford to pay a lane exclusively for my use. It’s 30 euros per hour. I have to pay the ticket for the swimming pool, I have to pay all my travels, not with the national team, but my travels for qualifiers, and I can’t pay my coach, who is in another swimming pool, in another center, because I can’t. Okay, I have to be fair: the ADO Plan pays me 1,900 euros monthly, but I’m a mother, I have a family. I have to pay the school, everything. So this is not enough for me. I have to pay someone to take care of my child when I am competing, when I am in the stages. I remember this year, preparing London, I needed to be out of home for 22 days, twice, ok? I needed to pay someone for being with my baby, and it’s very expensive. So it’s not enough. I win gold so I have this kind of money — is the same [as] sixth place in [the] Olympics. Someone who was sixth at the Olympics has the same as me with a gold medal. I was recently at the Congress of Deputies, and I was talking about this.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngIs the Spanish Paralympic Committee working to fix this? Is it one of their goals to adjust this problem?

Teresa Perales : Yes, but the Spanish Paralympic Committee are… Let me count.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngThey said six…

Teresa Perales : Yeah. [Laughs] It is true that the companies who support us, who support the ADO Paralympian Plan, it’s been easier to get them to sign again after London than those of the Olympians. But then again, it’s because the quantities are smaller!((es))

Being an elite female athlete[]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngIn other interviews you talk about your family life. That’s interesting, but you are an elite female athlete, and there’s other interesting questions. Is there anything…?

Teresa Perales : As female Paralympians, I think we are one, two, three, four. Four Paralympian mothers. Only. That we go to the Games. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngHow many women total, then?

Teresa Perales : Puf, I don’t know. It is very difficult, you know, to be a mother, train, compete, be at the stages, take care of the kid… sometimes it’s a balancing act. Apart from the physical changes that take place when you become a mother. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngParalympics in some sports have many fewer women than men, especially skiing. Is that something that exists in swimming, and does it hurt the quality of sport? Because the men in the skiing are like, the women, they are so few of them, they embarrass us, is that something that exists on a swimming level?

Teresa Perales : Yes. But not only in Spain, in the whole world.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngPeople say that women don’t swim as well as the men, because there’s so few?

Teresa Perales : We are very few. In Spain we had a problem before the Games due to the number of spots given to the Spanish women swimmers, which were a third of those offered to the men. And we had female swimmers who made the qualifying time but could not go to the Games. And in Spain qualifiers are hard, there are two kinds: A minimum and B minimum. I’m talking about swimming, athletics… Especially swimming. B minimum is until the eighth position, A minimum is until the third. So, there we women who would have made the finals, and could not go. But this is not a recent problem, it’s because of classification, at the World Championships… it’s not only a problem in Spain. It’s a problem that women do not participate as much as men. I really believe it is a family problem, a cultural problem, and it is a problem that comes from women traditionally doing more things than men and dedicating more time to their families than to training. A man doesn’t have to stop to have a child, usually has more support for the house things, and yet however women don’t.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngIn Australia they say, female sportswomen, fantastic, more medals! So they go for them. And that’s not the case here?

Teresa Perales : No. Not men or women. Only the medals. So if there’s a man who wins more medals, well, okay, the man. The problem is that this has to be potentiated before. It’s like the people with high support needs. There are fewer participants with high support needs, because it is much easier to tend to people with lesser disabilities. It’s like that.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.pngYou’re really fascinating. It’s a completely different perspective. Is there anything else people should know about Paralympics in Spain, or you?

Teresa Perales : Well, to be fair I should say that my case is special because I’m in Aragón, in Zaragoza, we’re very few sportspeople with disabilities that make the Games. It’s not the same a sportsperson who lives in a city with a High Performance Center, they have it better than me. ((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I want to thank you a lot, thank you!



Related news[]

Sources[]

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.
Wikinews
This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress