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September 3, 2012

Medals awarded at final day of rowing at London Paralympics

Medals awarded at final day of rowing at London Paralympics

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2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 3 January 2014: Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie
  • 15 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font
  • 11 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

Monday, September 3, 2012

London, England — The final day of rowing at the London Paralympics took place yesterday at Eton Dorney, with all the medals being decided. China finished on top, earning two golds. Ukraine came in second in rowing medals with a gold and a bronze, Great Britain earned a gold, France earned a pair of silver medals, Australia and Germany won a silver medal, and Belarus and Russia each won a bronze.

Coming into the AS Men Single Sculls, Tom Aggar of Great Britain was the gold medal favourite having not lost a major international competition. He failed in his quest. Australia’s Erik Horrie claimed silver in the event despite being in the hospital 24 hours earlier. With a close finish, Australia’s fans initially thought he won bronze.

The TA Mixed Double Sculls race was a fight for bronze with Gavin Bellis and Kathryn Ross of Australia being just beaten by Oksana Masters and Rob Jones of the United States by less than a second to finish fifth.

Sebastian Coe, Prince Edward, the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton and Australia’s Minister for Sport Kate Lundy were amongst the dignitaries that watched the medal races.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney. The coaches ride alongside their rowers.
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Australia’s Gavin Bellis and Kathryn Ross
Image: Laura Hale.

Kate Lundy in yellow
Image: Laura Hale.

Next to woman in white hood Countess of Wessex, Prince Edward, Edward’s niece, Kate Middleton and Sebastien Coe
Image: Laura Hale.

Nathalie Benoit of France, Alla Lysenko of the Ukraine and Liudmila Vauchok of Belarus get their medals in the AS Women Single Sculls
Image: Laura Hale.

Erik Horrie of Australia celebrates his silver medal
Image: Laura Hale.

Oksana Masters and Rob Jones listen to the Chinese national anthem during the medal ceremony for the TA Mixed Double Sculls
Image: Laura Hale.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 China 2 0 0 2
2 Ukraine 1 0 1 2
3 Great Britain 1 0 0 1
4 France 0 2 0 2
5 Australia 0 1 0 1
5 Germany 0 1 0 1
7 Russia 0 0 1 1
7 Belarus 0 0 1 1
7 United States 0 0 1 1



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 2, 2012

Medals given out at final day of rowing at London Paralympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories

Sunday, September 2, 2012

London, England — The final day of rowing at the London Paralympics took place today at Eton Dorney, with all the medals being decided. China finished on top, earning two golds. Ukraine came in second in rowing medals with a gold and a bronze, Great Britain earned a gold, France earned a pair of silver medals, Australia and Germany won a silver medal, and Belarus and Russia each won a bronze.

Coming into the AS Men Single Sculls, Tom Aggar of Great Britain was the gold medal favourite having not lost a major international competition. He failed in his quest. Australia’s Erik Horrie claimed silver in the event despite being in the hospital 24 hours earlier. With a close finish, Australia’s fans initially thought he won bronze.

The TA Mixed Double Sculls race was a fight for bronze with Gavin Bellis and Kathryn Ross of Australia being just beaten by Oksana Masters and Rob Jones of the United States by less than a second to finish fifth.

Sebastian Coe, Prince Edward, the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton and Australia’s Minister for Sport Kate Lundy were amongst the dignitaries that watched the medal races.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney. The coaches ride alongside their rowers.
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Australia’s Gavin Bellis and Kathryn Ross
Image: Laura Hale.

Kate Lundy in the yellow
Image: Laura Hale.

Next to woman in white hood Countess of Wessex, Prince Edward, Edward’s niece, Kate Middleton and Sebastien Coe
Image: Laura Hale.

Nathalie Benoit of France, Alla Lysenko of the Ukraine and Liudmila Vauchok of Belarus get their medals in the AS Women Single Sculls
Image: Laura Hale.

Erik Horrie of Australia celebrates his silver medal
Image: Laura Hale.

Oksana Masters and Rob Jones listen to the Chinese national anthem during the medal ceremony for the TA Mixed Double Sculls
Image: Laura Hale.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 China 2 0 0 2
2 Ukraine 1 0 1 2
3 Great Britain 1 0 0 1
4 France 0 2 0 2
5 Australia 0 1 0 1
5 Germany 0 1 0 1
7 Russia 0 0 1 1
7 Belarus 0 0 1 1
7 United States 0 0 1 1



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 29, 2012

Australian adaptive rowers prepare as paralympics looms

Australian adaptive rowers prepare as Paralympics looms

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Horrie Training on the 1000m course, Lake Burley Griffin.
Image: Tim Collins.

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Yarralumla, Australia — Members of the Australian Adaptive Rowing team, consisting of Kathryn Ross, Erik Horrie, and John Maclean, are currently finalising their Australian based training for the paralympics on the waters of Lake Burley Griffin, Canberra. Our reporters interviewed Erik Horrie, an arms and shoulder (AS) single scull competitor, who is moving towards his first paralympics. We asked about his preperations, and the sport in general.

Horrie , 32, says that he is hoping for strong results for the team in the preceding third rowing world cup mid June in Munich. 2011, Horrie’s debut year rowing at a national level after a background in wheelchair basketball, saw him place fourth in his first world cup event. In a Canberra winter, temperatures routinely remain sub-zero as athletes prepare, early morning, on the water. Horrie commented that despite conditions, a far cry from those found by his Queensland-based “Dragons” club, he trains six times a week, including strength sessions at the nearby Australian Institute of Sport [AIS] facilities, and cross training.

Horrie on the water, Lake Burley Griffin.
Image: Tim Collins.

Funding for the sport has increased significantly in Australia in recent years, especially since it’s introduction to the paralympics in Beijing. Horrie commented that competitive successes have seen a increase in funding toward the program. A substantial allocation allowed the AIS to host four athletes on site and secure a second fleet of boats for their European base. Rowing equipment comes at a substantial cost with an eight costing fifty five thousand dollars. Finding athletes is a primary focus, especially with the limited pool of disabled athletes to draw upon, and the AIS runs active talent searching programs.

Horrie told Wikinews reporters that despite increasing media attention his focus remains on fun.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 3, 2012

Australian rowers prepare for 2012 Olympics

Australian rowers prepare for 2012 Olympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Tuesday, April 3, 2012

2012 Olympics and Paralympics Team
Men’s Single Scull

Jared Bidwell (QLD)

Men’s Double Scull

Scott Brennan (TAS)
David Crawshay (VIC)

Men’s Quad Scull

Daniel Noonan (NSW)
Karsten Forsterling (VIC)
James McRae (SA)
Chris Morgan (SA)

Women’s Double Scull

Kim Crow (VIC)
Brooke Pratley (NSW)

Women’s Quad Scull

Kerry Hore (TAS)
Pippa Savage (QLD)
Pauline Frasca (VIC)
Dana Faletic (TAS)

Men’s Lightweight Double Scull

Tom Gibson (TAS)
Rod Chisholm (NSW)

Women’s Lightweight Double Scull

Bronwen Watson (NSW)
Hannah Every-Hall (QLD)

Men’s Coxless Four

Joshua Dunkley-Smith (VIC)
Drew Ginn (VIC)
James Chapman (NSW)
Will Lockwood (VIC)

Men’s Coxed Eight

Bryn Coudraye (SA)
Matt Ryan (NSW)
Nicholas Purnell (NSW)
Tom Swann (VIC)
Joshua Booth (VIC)
Cameron McKenzie-McHarg (VIC)
Francis Hegerty (NSW)
Sam Loch (NSW)
Toby Lister (NSW)

Women’s Coxless Pair

Kate Hornsey (TAS)
Sarah Tait (VIC)

Men’s Lightweight Coxless Four

Todd Skipworth (WA)
Ben Cureton (WA)
Sam Beltz (TAS)
Anthony Edwards (TAS)

Arms Only Men’s Single Scull

Erik Horrie (QLD)

Trunk and Arms Double Scull (Squad)

Kathryn Ross (VIC)
John Maclean (NSW)
Gavin Bellis (VIC)

Winners of 1980 Olympiad in rowing and canoeing (single sculls), including Australian silver medalist J. Sumegi. Australia is hoping to medal in 2012 in London.
Image: A. Solomonov / А. Соломонов.

Over the weekend, Rowing Australia announced their 2012 national squad in the lead up to the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics in London. Australia has earned qualification for ten boats at the Games but have the opportunity to add three additional boats at the Final Olympic Qualification Regatta in Lucerne, Switzerland in late May.

One boat attempting to earn qualification at Lucerne is the women’s coxed-eight, who had a time at the Sydney Regatta of 2000m time of six minutes 10.03 seconds, about 96% as fast as the predicted time of the gold medal time at the 2012 Summer Olympics. Selection for a team is considered a major boon for women’s rowing as Australia had not been competing internationally in the event after a disappointing performance at the 2008 Games in Beijing, where Australia finished well out of medal range in last, and has yet to live down the “Lay Down Sally” situation at the 2004 Games. Ten rowers, Phoebe Stanley, Hannah Vermeersch, Alexandra Hagan, Sally Kehoe, Tess Gerrand, Renee Chatterton, Emma McCarthy, Sarah Cook, Amy Clay and Robyn Selby-Smith, were named with only eight spots available. The women’s coxed-eight team will spend the next three weeks training before cuts will be made for the Qualifiers.

Teams to be trimmed back
Men’s Coxless Pair (Squad)

Brodie Buckland (NSW)
James Marburg (VIC)
Duncan Free (QLD)
Fergus Pragnell (NSW)
Tom Larkins (VIC)
5 rowers will be cut down to 2 prior to the Lucrene qualifiers.

Women’s Coxed Eight (Squad)

Phoebe Stanley (VIC)
Hannah Vermeersch (WA)
Alexandra Hagan (WA)
Sally Kehoe (QLD)
Tess Gerrand (NSW)
Renee Chatterton (SA)
Emma McCarthy (QLD)
Sarah Cook (NSW)
Amy Clay (NSW)
Robyn Selby Smith (VIC)
Lizzy Patrick (VIC)
10 rowers will be cut down to 8 prior to the Lucrene qualifiers.

The men’s lightweight double scull will be competing for Olympic qualification in Switzerland, with Tom Gibson of Tasmania and Rod Chisholm of New South Wales needing a top two finish to make the Games. Queensland Jared Bidwell in the men’s heavyweight single scull is the third boat trying to qualify for London at the Switzerland event, needing a top-three finish to qualify.

The men’s coxless pair boat also faces competition for which rowers will be going to the Games, with five rowers having been named to fill the two spots. These rowers include Brodie Buckland, James Marburg, Fergus Pragnell, Duncan Free and Tom Larkins. The 2008 Olympic pairs gold medalist Free’s selection comes after a ten-month period where he suffered a rib-cartilage injury and broken leg that resulted in missing selection in the four man scull event. Other rows competing for one of these two spots have impressive resumes: Buckland has previously represented the United States in rowing and Marburg won a silver medal in rowing at the 2008 Games.

Toby Lister, who qualified in the men’s coxed eight boat as the coxswain, is ready for the Games in more ways than one. He became the boat leader in 2008, following the retirement of Marty Rabjohns after the Olympics. He is renowned amongst other rowers for his willingness and ability to play mind games with competitors.

Last Thursday, the uniforms for Australia’s Olympic team were revealed, including the uniform for rowing. It has been custom designed by Adidas to mirror muscle movement.

A new director was named at the Australian Institute of Sport on Sunday. New director Matthew Favier, who comes from the United Kingdom, has the ability to determine funding for high performance sport, and is scene as a potential positive for rowing as he could increase funding to the sport because it provides multiple Olympic medal potential for one sport.

The national team will have a Sydney training camp from May 8 to 12, before departing for Switzerland on May 15th.



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 9, 2007

Rower Tuijn halfway across Pacific in record attempt

Rower Tuijn halfway across Pacific in record attempt

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Monday, July 9, 2007

Map of the Pacific Ocean.

Dutch adventurer Ralph Tuijn has reached the halfway point of his attempt to be the first person to row across the Pacific Ocean unaided.

The 16,000 kilometre journey from the coast of Peru to the seaside city of Brisbane, Australia, the widest section of the Pacific, has never been crossed absolutely unaided by a rower, and Tuijn says just nine people have rowed it even with assistance.

Tuijn reached the central point of his crossing, an insignificant point of water in the ocean, 111 days after setting off from Peru in March. He has been making good progress, and has since cut his estimated time of arrival in Brisbane by a month.

The Dutchman, who now expects to reach his destination on October 20, has kept in touch with those tracking his movements through daily internet postings from his laptop computer, including his wife Winnie. His boat, the Zeeman Challenger, is a seven-metre custom plywood vessel.

Tuijn has overcome a variety of obstacles to reach the halfway point. He is suffering from the constant attention of sharks, who often bump his boat and disrupt his attempts at sleep. One particular shark, dubbed ‘Gomulka’ by Tuijn, has been trailing the adventurer’s boat for extended periods.

He has also accidentally burnt himself when he spilled hot water on his foot whilst trying to make coffee, apparently also from a shark ‘bump’. He is also forced to manually pump water for cooking and drinking after his automatic water pump broke down not long into his journey.

Cquote1.svg “Physically everything feels great and I can’t help feeling that I could do this for 500 days, but mentally it’s still hard to be on your own for such a long time”
Cquote2.svg

—Ralph Tuijn

His vessel has no motors or sails, but relies on his physical rowing power to move. The boat does have a solar power system to provide energy for his laptop, a telephone and a global positioning system.

Tujin, who is raising money for a children’s home in Mumbai, India, is rowing at an average speed of 58 kilometres each day. His diet consists of freeze-dried foods and fish, which are keeping him physically well-conditioned despite tiring mentally.

Tuijn is a serial adventurer and experienced rower. He has rowed across the Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea, as well as cycled across Russia and the icy terrain of Greenland.

Sources

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April 7, 2007

Rowing: Cambridge win the 153rd Boat Race

Rowing: Cambridge win the 153rd Boat Race

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Saturday, April 7, 2007

Cambridge University have defeated Oxford University by 1¼ lengths to win the 153rd Boat Race. The Light Blues won with a time of 17 minutes and 49 seconds to record their first win in three years. Oxford finished with a time of 18 minutes and 2 seconds.

Oxford won the toss and chose to row on the Surrey side of the river, with Cambridge rowing on the Middlesex side. Oxford had the stronger start and were ahead for much of the first half of the race. They had a slight advantage over Cambridge at Hammersmith Bridge, where they would be favoured by racing the inside of the upcoming bend. However Cambridge never lost touch and pulled ahead at Chiswick steps, maintaining their lead for the remainder of the race.

Before the race, Cambridge were strong favourites, being 9lb heavier per man on average. The Cambridge crew had 5 returning blues compared to Oxford’s one. Furthermore the international achievement of Cambridge’s rowers far exceeded that of Oxford: the World Champion stern pair of Germans Thorsten Engelmann (the heaviest ever oarsman at 110.8kg) and Sebastian Schulte, Olympic Gold medallist Kieran West MBE and GB medal winner Tom James.

The heavily fancied Cambridge crew did not win by the margin expected by many, thanks in part to a strong row from Oxford, and the sagging stern containing the heaviest Cambridge oarsmen.

Also of note, only a week before, Cambridge were victorious at the prestigious Head of the River Race (raced on the same course, but from Mortlake to Putney). However the race was abandoned due to weather conditions with only 29 out of 420 crews finishing.

The race, first held in 1829, is currently held on a 6,779 m (4 miles and 374 yards) stretch of the River Thames in London from Putney to Mortlake. Overall, Cambridge lead Oxford by 79 wins to 73 with one dead heat.

In the earlier race for reserve crews, Goldie (Cambridge) beat Isis (Oxford).

Racing for the women’s and lightweight crews took place at Henley on April 1st, where Cambridge won the Women’s Boat Race and Oxford won the reserve women’s, lightweight women’s, lightweight men’s and reserve lightweight men’s races.

Crews

Position Cambridge Oxford
Bow Kristopher McDaniel (St Edmund’s) Robin Ejsmond-Frey (Oriel)
2 Dan O’Shaughnessy (St Edmund’s) Adam Kosmicki (Oriel)
3 Peter Champion (St Edmund’s) Michal Plotkowiak (Brasenose)
4 Jacob Cornelius (Emmanuel) Magnus Fleming (Worcester)
5 Tom James (Trinity Hall) Andrew Wright (St Edmund Hall)
6 Kieran West (Pembroke) William Buckland (Jesus)
7 Sebastian Schulte (Gonville and Caius) Terence Kookyer (Keble)
Stroke Thorsten Engelmann (St Edmund’s) Ante Kusurin (St Catherine’s)
Cox Rebecca Dowbiggin (Emmanuel) Nicholas Brodie (St Catherine’s)

Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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