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January 29, 2012

Herman Cain endorses Newt Gingrich for US president

Herman Cain endorses Newt Gingrich for US president

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Sunday, January 29, 2012

Herman Cain in November 2011.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

Herman Cain, Georgia businessman and former Republican candidate for President of the United States, endorsed Newt Gingrich for the Republican nomination. Cain, who suspended his own presidential campaign last December, announced his endorsement yesterday at a Republican event in West Palm Beach, Florida.

In his endorsement of the former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Cain said, “I hereby officially and enthusiastically endorse Newt Gingrich for president of the United States”. Cain’s endorsement of Gingrich comes days before the Florida Republican primary, scheduled for this Tuesday.

Cain said Gingrich, who vowed to reporters he would stay in the race for the Republican nomination until the national nominating convention this August in Tampa, Florida regardless of Tuesday’s results, has been going through a “sausage grinder” during this election cycle.

Cain suspended his own campaign for the Republican party nomination for the presidency of the United States last December after allegations of sexual misconduct and a decline in his popularity among voters.

In a poll of likely Florida voters released yesterday by Reuters and Ipsos, Mitt Romney led Newt Gingrich by an 11 percentage point margin, three points higher than Friday. Out of those who responded, 43% supported Romney to Gingrich’s 32%. In the poll released Friday, the results were 41% to 33% for Romney and Gingrich, respectively.



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January 22, 2012

U.S. presidential candidate Newt Gingrich wins South Carolina primary

U.S. presidential candidate Newt Gingrich wins South Carolina primary

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Sunday, January 22, 2012

Former U.S. Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich of Georgia won the Republican Party South Carolina presidential primary yesterday with 243,153 votes (40.4%). Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, who won the New Hampshire primary last week, came in second with 167,279 (27.8%). The result reflects a shift in polling just days before the election, following two Grand Old Party (GOP) debates and a highly publicized interview with Gingrich’s ex-wife.

In his victory speech, Gingrich criticized President Barack Obama and the “media elites”, and alluded to the well-funded Romney when arguing, “We don’t have the kind of money that at least one of the candidates does. But we do have ideas and we do have people and we’ve proved here in South Carolina that people power with the right ideas beats big money.”

Romney, who had been criticized by Gingrich for his business practices as CEO of Bain Capital, commented after the results were announced, “Those who pick up the weapons of the left today will find them turned against us tomorrow…if Republican leaders want to join this president in demonizing success…then they’re not going to be fit to be our nominee.”

Gingrich with his wife Callista in January 2012.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

Just a week ago, Gingrich trailed Romney by ten points in South Carolina; however, Gingrich was thought to have been successful in the two debates before the primary. During the first on Monday, he received a standing ovation for his comments on race and employment, and on Thursday, received another standing ovation after criticizing moderator John King for discussing his previous marriage. Exit polls by CBS News indicated that 65 percent of voters believed the debates were an important factor in considering a candidate, with 13 percent saying it was the most important factor.

Moreover, those polls suggest Gingrich won broad support from the Tea Party and evangelicals, who questioned Romney’s sincerity on social issues. They apparently decided to overlook an interview that aired just before the primary, in which Gingrich’s ex-wife claimed Gingrich asked for an “open marriage“.

According to Furman University political science professor Brent Nelsen, Gingrich “tapped the emotion of the right-wing electorate, and that washes away all of the questions.”

Former Senator Rick Santorum, who, after a recent recount was found to have actually won the January 3 Iowa Caucus, finished in third place with 102,055 votes (17%). Congressman Ron Paul came in fourth with 77,993 (13%). Texas governor Rick Perry, who earlier withdrew from the race and endorsed Gingrich, finished sixth behind the withdrawn Herman Cain.

Historically, the winner of the South Carolina primary has gone on to win the Republican Party nomination; however, this is the first time three different candidates won the first three contests.

The result gives Gingrich 23 delegates, placing him first overall, ahead of Romney who has 19. Santorum is third with thirteen and Paul is fourth with three. The campaigns now shift to Florida for that state’s January 31 primary. Romney currently leads in the latest polling.

According to Republican strategist Adam Temple, “Gingrich will carry momentum into Florida, but his campaign doesn’t appear to be as durable for the long haul.”

Results

Candidate Votes Percentage Results by County
Newt Gingrich 243,153 40.4%
Image: Gage Skidmore.

██ Newt Gingrich

██ Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney 167,279 27.8%
Rick Santorum 102,055 17.0%
Ron Paul 77,993 13.0%
Herman Cain* 6,324 1.1%
Rick Perry* 2,494 0.4%
Jon Huntsman, Jr.* 1,161 0.2%
Michele Bachmann* 494 0.1%
Gary Johnson* 213 0.0%

* – Withdrew before the vote


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January 12, 2012

Mitt Romney wins the 2012 New Hampshire Republican primary

Mitt Romney wins the 2012 New Hampshire Republican primary

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Thursday, January 12, 2012

Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney won the first-in-the-US New Hampshire Republican primary on Tuesday with 97,600 votes (39.3%). This follows his narrow victory in the Iowa Caucus last week. Congressman Ron Paul, who finished third in the Iowa Caucus, came in second with 56,872 votes (22.9%). Former Utah governor Jon Huntsman, Jr., who spent a great amount of resources on the primary, came in third place with 41,783 votes (16.8%).

Romney in December 2011.
Image: Gage Skidmore..

The New Hampshire primary, the first primary of the election, is the second in a series of state elections that help to assign delegates to candidates to determine the presidential nominee of the Republican Party. Delegates can also be assigned from members of the Republican National Committee, though these are unpledged and subject to change. To win the nomination, a candidate must accumulate 1,144 delegates.

With his victory, Romney claimed seven delegates to increase his total to 25 with unpledged delegates included. Paul won three delegates for his finish to total ten delegates, placing him second overall to Romney. Despite his third place finish, Huntsman is currently sixth overall in delegates with only the two he won in New Hampshire. He currently trails former Senator Rick Santorum who has compiled eight delegates overall, followed by Texas governor Rick Perry with four, and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich with three.

In his victory speech, Romney criticized President Barack Obama, saying he “wants to turn America into a European-style entitlement society,” countering that he himself wants “to ensure that we remain a free and prosperous land of opportunity.” Romney received a call following the results from Paul, who offered his congratulations. Paul mentioned afterwards that “He certainly had a clear-cut victory. But we’re nibbling at his heels.” Paul, a libertarian, added, “I have to chuckle when they describe us as being dangerous. That’s one thing they are telling the truth [about]. Because we are dangerous to the status quo in this country!”

Though some Huntsman supporters were disappointed with their candidate’s third place finish, Huntsman stated his “confidence in the system is reborn because of the people of New Hampshire”. He announced he would remain in the race and head to South Carolina for that state’s primary on January 21.

Gingrich finished in fifth place with 23,291 votes (9.4%) slightly behind Santorum who won 23,408 votes (9.4%) despite the surge from his strong showing in the Iowa Caucus. Perry, who did not focus on New Hampshire after the Iowa Caucus, finished with 1,764 votes (0.7%).

The campaigns now head to South Carolina, where all six major candidates still in the race will compete. The latest We Ask America poll from South Carolina shows Romney with 26 percent, ahead of Gingrich with 21 percent and Santorum with 13 percent.

New Hampshire Republican primary complete results

Candidate Votes Percentage Delegates Results by County
Mitt Romney 97,600 39.3% 7
Image: Lolthatswonderful.

██ Mitt Romney

██ Ron Paul

Ron Paul 56,872 22.9% 3
Jon Huntsman, Jr. 41,783 16.9% 2
Rick Santorum 23,408 9.4%
Newt Gingrich 23,291 9.4%
Rick Perry 1,764 0.7%
Buddy Roemer 950 0.4%
Write-ins 540 0.2%
Fred Karger 485 0.2%
Michele Bachmann[1] 350 0.1%
Kevin Rubash 249 0.1%
Gary Johnson[2] 181 0.1%
Herman Cain[3] 161 0.1%
Jeff Lawman 119 0.0%
Christopher Hill 108 0.0%
Benjamin Linn 83 0.0%
Michael Meehan 54 0.0%
Keith Drummond 42 0.0%
Joe Story 42 0.0%
Bear Betzler 29 0.0%
Joe Robinson 25 0.0%
Stewart Greenleaf 24 0.0%
Mark Callahan 20 0.0%
Andy Martin 19 0.0%
Linden Swift 18 0.0%
Timothy Brewer 15 0.0%
Vern Wuensche 15 0.0%
John Davis 14 0.0%
Randy Crow 12 0.0%
Hugh Cort 3 0.0%
James Vestermark 3 0.0%
  1. Bachmann dropped out following the Iowa Caucus
  2. Johnson dropped out in December to seek the Libertarian Party presidential nomination
  3. Cain dropped out in December



Related articles

  • “Mitt Romney wins Iowa Caucus by eight votes over surging Rick Santorum” — Wikinews, January 5, 2012
  • “U.S. presidential candidate Gary Johnson leaves GOP to vie for the LP nom” — Wikinews, December 29, 2011

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January 1, 2012

On the campaign trail, December 2011

On the campaign trail, December 2011 – Wikinews, the free news source

On the campaign trail, December 2011

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Sunday, January 1, 2012

The following is the second in a monthly series chronicling the U.S. 2012 presidential election. It features original material compiled throughout the previous month after a brief mention of some of the month’s biggest stories.

In this month’s edition on the campaign trail: the campaign manager for a candidate already seeking two presidential nominations discusses the likelihood his candidate will run for the Reform Party’s nomination; a lesser known candidates forum reveals an alternative fuel possibility and concludes in a dramatic fashion; and the newly nominated candidate for the Boston Tea Party talks with Wikinews.

Summary

Ron Paul speaks at an Iowa campaign event, December 28.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

In December 2011, businessman Herman Cain ended his campaign for the Republican Party’s presidential nomination amid allegations of sexual harassment and an extramarital affair. Hoping to appeal to social conservatives, Texas governor Rick Perry released a commercial in Iowa entitled “Strong”, in which he states, “there’s something wrong in this country when gays can serve openly in the military but our kids can’t openly celebrate Christmas or pray in school.” While the video received 24,407 likes by the end of the month, it received 725,698 dislikes.

Frontrunner Newt Gingrich had trouble of his own after he suggested during an interview with The Jewish Channel that Palestinians were an “invented people”. He refused to retract the comments at the final GOP debate before the January 3 Iowa Caucus. Gingrich’s lead in the polls disappeared as Mitt Romney won big endorsements from South Carolina governor Nikki Haley, former Senator Bob Dole, and former president George H.W. Bush.

Meanwhile, Congressman Ron Paul rose in the polls as well, trailing Romney by two points in the final NBC/Marist poll of the year with Rick Santorum surging and Rick Perry close behind. However, Paul encountered his own troubles as the media reported on articles published in his newsletters from the 1980s and 1990s that included incendiary comments about blacks, gays, and Israel. Paul says he did not write the articles and has publicly disavowed them in the past. Additionally, Paul won the backing of Iowa State Senator Kent Sorenson, who previously served as the state chairman for Michele Bachmann, who continued to sag in the polls since winning the Ames Straw Poll in August.

Former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson, another candidate who had been low in the Republican polls, announced a switch to the Libertarian Party to run for that party’s presidential nomination. Analysts have suggested that if Johnson wins the Libertarian nomination, he could possibly take votes away from the Republican nominee and help President Barack Obama win re-election.

Possible Reform Party candidate?

Roemer speaks to the Reform Party of New Jersey on December 10.
Image: Greenguy89.

Presidential candidate Buddy Roemer addressed members of the Reform Party of New Jersey on December 10 at a joint Reform Party-Tea Party event. The meeting raised speculation that Roemer, who is currently running for the presidential nominations of both the Republican Party and Americans Elect, would also seek the nomination of the Reform Party of the United States of America.

Dennis Mikolay, a member of the New Jersey party’s leadership, wrote on his blog that “there are efforts within the Reform Party to draft him [Roemer] as their candidate”. However, Roemer, who served as Governor of Louisiana as a Republican, does not seem interested in the nomination. According to campaign manager Carlos Sierra, the Reform Party has “reached out to us…but the Governor does not intend to seek their nomination. He is focused primarily on the GOP nomination. We think once his message gets a stage and an audience, that it will resonate with the Republican Party and Independents. The problem is he keeps getting shut out of the debates.”

Industrialist Ross Perot founded the Reform Party in 1995. He won the party’s presidential nomination the next year and received over eight percent of the popular vote, the highest percentage for a third party candidate since. After this, the party was plagued by infighting, and decreased in prominence. In 2008, Ted Weill was nominated for president, but appeared only on the ballot in Mississippi and received 481 votes.

For 2012, three candidates have announced their intentions to seek the party’s nomination: former college football coach Robby Wells, Earth Intelligence Network CEO Robert David Steele, and small business owner Andre Barnett.

Lesser-known candidates forum

On December 19, the New Hampshire Institute of Politics hosted a forum at St. Anselm College to present lesser-known candidates for the Republican and Democratic Party presidential nominations. Wikinews covered the Democratic Party forum that showcased candidates challenging President Barack Obama for that party’s presidential nomination, including anti-abortion activist Randall Terry and performance artist Vermin Supreme.

Vermin Supreme glitter bombs Randall Terry during the Democratic Party presidential candidates forum as John Wolfe looks on.
Image: Marc Nozell.

A high point of the forum occurred after Vermin Supreme delivered his final statement. He exclaimed, “Jesus told me to make Randall Terry gay” and proceeded to glitter bomb Terry while shouting, “he’s turning gay.” Terry had earlier affirmed his opposition to same-sex marriage, comparing it to slavery and abortion. Supreme later told Wikinews that Terry “took his glittering like a man, a gay man. I don’t know if the fairy dust turned him gay right away, but he took his medicine, and he seemed to enjoy it on some level.” Though Terry could not be reached for comment, he wrote on his blog that the glitter bombing “appeared to have no impact on me becoming homosexual.” Supreme claims he was threatened by a Terry supporter after the forum and is now “seeking Secret Service protection.” He has no plans to glitter bomb anyone else.

Supreme says that he had previously met Terry at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, and “was given the distinct impression that he (Terry) wanted to perform fellatio on me.” He says that prior to the forum, he offered “to have ‘homosexual gay sex’ in the lavatory stall”, but Terry declined. During the forum, Supreme said that he planned to write-in Terry, but said afterwards that his support “depends how gay he [Terry] gets.”

Dr. Bob Greene, a physicist who also participated in the forum, commented that the glitter bombing “was inappropriate for the circumstances.” During the forum, Greene differentiated himself from his opponents by discussing the use of thorium as an alternative fuel, saying “we have enough thorium for all of our energy needs for well over a thousand years.” He elaborated further after the forum, explaining that thorium could be used by bombarding it with neutrons, after which it fissions. “The fuel”, he explained, “is a molten salt, really Thorium Fluoride with a couple of stable-izers.” Greene says that it is safer and produces less waste than conventional methods, but “the military favored the uranium cycle because you could get lots of plutonium out of it, which they wanted for bombs. Thorium – not so.”

Others that participated in the Democratic forum include writer Ed Cowan, lawyer John Haywood, activist Edward O’Donnell Jr., and lawyer John Wolfe.


Boston Tea Party presidential nomination

On December 23, the Boston Tea Party (BTP) nominated Howard Community College trustee Tiffany Briscoe of Maryland as its second presidential nominee. The BTP was formed in 2006 and “supports reducing the size, scope and power of government at all levels and on all issues, and opposes increasing the size, scope and power of government at any level, for any purpose.” In 2008, the party nominated boxing manager Charles Jay, who appeared on three state ballots and won a total of 2,422 votes.

Briscoe’s platform calls for the legalization of drugs, a repeal of the USA PATRIOT Act, and an end to subsidies and foreign aid. Former radio host Kimberly Johnson was selected as her running mate.

Briscoe took some time to speak with Wikinews about her campaign and the BTP.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.pngHow do you plan to gain ballot access for the BTP?

Briscoe: The BTP is a fairly new political party. Yet, it has great potential. Its message of individual freedom and free markets resonates with a great majority of the American people that do not seem to be content with the current Establishment. We need to campaign massively, which we are already doing, to collect enough petition signatures and get on as many ballots as possible. I will myself contribute financially to help get the party on the ballot in such states as Colorado and Louisiana. At the end of the day, we will probably be able to appear on 14 to 15 states throughout the country, and stay as a write-in candidate in virtually all the others.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.pngIdeologically, how are you different from Ron Paul or Gary Johnson?

Briscoe: Ron Paul and Gary Johnson are two great men that have helped the cause of liberty by working from the inside of the government. But they do not reflect the true nature of libertarianism. Paul has become a typical politician, taking pork barrel to his district to get reelected, wants to restrict immigration, and wants to plague the economy with an entire new series of tax credits and corporate loopholes for energy and health care reform. Gary Johnson, while he did veto more laws than any other governor in the 1990s, also encounters the same problem: he wants to keep Guantanamo Bay open with the so-called “enemy combatant” inside, he opposes the end of the Federal Reserve that is creating so much troubles with our economy, and even wants to establish a FairTax that would increase consumer prices in a way that will slow economic development. So while I do consider myself as an ideological ally of these two men, I don’t believe they’re doing the best they can when it comes to promoting the philosophy of freedom.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.pngWhat do you hope to accomplish with this campaign, and what would constitute a success?

Briscoe: Of course, I am not running just to get my name or the party’s name out there, even though the latter is also a goal. I am running to show that there are actually some people outside of Washington that still care about the future of our country, to show that all these independent-minded folks are not alone in their daily fight against the federal government. But with 60% of the people wishing to see a third party play a more important role and with an even greater portion saying they would consider voting for a third party in 2012, we might have more chances to reach success than we may think. Of course, the ultimate success would be paving the way to the White House but at this point, I believe only taking away votes from the true “spoilers” that the Establishment represents in a way that would change the ultimate course of the election would already make us proud.



Related articles

  • “U.S. presidential candidate Gary Johnson leaves GOP to vie for the LP nom” — Wikinews, December 29, 2011
  • “South Carolina governor Nikki Haley endorses Mitt Romney for U.S. president” — Wikinews, December 17, 2011
  • “Republican hopeful Gingrich fuels controversy over Palestinian ‘invented people’ remarks” — Wikinews, December 11, 2011
  • Campaign manager: 100 percent chance Buddy Roemer will run for Americans Elect presidential nomination” — Wikinews, December 1, 2011
  • “U.S. Presidential candidate Michele Bachmann narrowly edges Ron Paul in Ames Straw Poll‎” — Wikinews, August 15, 2011

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December 2, 2011

On the campaign trail, November 2011

On the campaign trail, November 2011 – Wikinews, the free news source

On the campaign trail, November 2011

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Friday, December 2, 2011

The following is the first in a monthly series chronicling the U.S. 2012 presidential election. It will feature original material compiled throughout the previous month after a brief mention of some of the month’s biggest stories.

In this month’s edition on the campaign trail: the Party for Socialism and Liberation nominates an underaged presidential ticket; a college football coach announces that he is running for president; and a candidate excluded from the GOP debates answers whether or not he would run under a third party label.

Summary

Herman Cain rejects claims of sexual harassment at a press conference, November 8.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

In November 2011, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich surpassed businessman Herman Cain in opinion polls as frontrunner for the Republican Party’s presidential nomination. Cain’s campaign was troubled with allegations of sexual harassment and a romantic affair. The previous frontrunner, Texas governor Rick Perry, had a “brain freeze” during a debate while trying to name the last of the three federal agencies he would abolish.

Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, who has consistently polled high, led several sources to conclude that he would inevitably win the GOP nomination and match up against incumbent President Barack Obama of the Democratic Party. However, if nominated, Romney might not be the only challenger currently vying for the GOP nomination. There was speculation that two candidates excluded from November’s GOP debates, former Louisiana governor Buddy Roemer and former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson, would run for the presidential nominations of other political parties to challenge Obama and the GOP candidate.

Party for Socialism and Liberation nominates underaged ticket

PSL presidential nominee Peta Lindsay
Image: PLSweb.

The Party for Socialism and Liberation (PSL) nominated 27-year-old activist Peta Lindsay for president and 26-year-old immigrant Yari Osorio for vice president in November. Because of their ages, both are constitutionally ineligible to serve if elected.

The PSL, which was founded in 2006 after a split from the Workers World Party, is the second socialist party to name its ticket. In October, the Socialist Party USA nominated 2008 vice presidential candidate Stewart Alexander for president and selected lawn care business owner Alejandro Mendoza as his running mate.

Lindsay is now challenging Alexander for the Peace and Freedom Party‘s presidential nomination, according to that party’s State Executive Committee members Kevin Akin and Bob Evans. Whoever receives this nomination will be guaranteed ballot access in California. In 2008, the PSL achieved ballot access in twelve states with nominee Gloria La Riva. La Riva also sought the Peace and Freedom Party nomination but lost to independent candidate Ralph Nader.

Ballot access may be difficult for the Lindsay-Osorio ticket since many states only allow constitutionally eligible candidates to appear on the ballot. In the past, parties that nominated constitutionally ineligible candidates were forced to name placeholders for such states.

Despite this, the ticket promises to “get into the [presidential] debates.”

Football coach running for president

Former Savannah State University football coach Robby Wells announced November 21 that he is running for president as an independent candidate. The announcement occurred during a press conference just hours after the settlement of his wrongful termination suit against Savannah State. Wells alleged he had been fired in January 2010 for recruiting too many white players in the largely black school. The school argued that he was fired for mishandling records and not following directions. As coach, his record was 7–15.

Political science professor Robert Eisinger of Savannah College of Art and Design said “nobody knows” Wells and “his chances [as a candidate] are slim to none. As in zilch, nada.”

Wikinews caught up with Wells via e-mail to find out why he decided to run, how he was different from other candidates, and whether he felt candidates with low name recognition are “delusional”.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.pngWhat compelled you (personally) to run for president?

Coach Wells: I am running for president for the people of this great country. There are over 40 million people living at or below the poverty level in the United States. We have 14 million Americans that are unemployed and over 25 million people that are underemployed. The American Dream has been replaced with an economic nightmare for many Americans, and we need to make a real change. I believe that it is time for America to think outside the box. I have served my country in the Army National Guard, and I have been a public servant, serving as a teacher and football coach. My platform is called the Gameplan, and you can view it on my campaign web site at www.electrobbywells.com.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.pngHow are you different from any of the other 286 people [now 291] that filed with the FEC to run for president?

Coach Wells: “I can not speak for the other 286 people that filed with the FEC to run for the office of President of the United States, but there is a lot of difference between myself and the top Republican candidates and President Obama. Unlike the top candidates that are worth millions of dollars, I am a representation of the vast majority of people in America. I know what it feels like to be unemployed, and I know how it feels to struggle to provide for my family. If elected, I will be concerned more with doing my job than keeping my job. I will be more concerned about the American citizens having jobs, and creating new jobs for the unemployed.”

Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.pngWhat is your response to people who think that non-politicians with low name recognition that run for president are delusional?

Coach Wells: “America is facing some major challenges, and serious people must be willing to take a stand for the country they love. I have been a college football coach for 15 years, and most recently the Head Football Coach at Savannah State University. Savannah State is an NCAA Division – I school. I believe that my name is currently recognized in the southeastern part of the nation, and we hope to spread that recognition across the country. I love to compete, and I love winning. I was called delusional when I took the head football coaching position at Savannah State because I was the first white head football coach at the black college (HBCU), but I was the most successful coach at Savannah State in the past decade. I am very serious about my plan for the country, and I understand that I am a long shot. In order for my campaign to win, the people of this great nation must join our team, and send Washington a message. The message is very simple. ‘We are the people of the United States of America, and our only option is to succeed as a nation.'”

Will another GOP candidate consider a third party nomination?

Fred Karger campaigns in Iowa.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

After GOP candidates Buddy Roemer and Gary Johnson were excluded from all the presidential debates in November, Johnson is now considering a run for the Libertarian Party nomination and Roemer has already decided to pursue the nomination of Americans Elect. That leaves behind Fred Karger, another GOP candidate who received some notice in presidential polls and was excluded from debates.

In August, Karger, who holds the distinction as the first openly-gay person to seek the nomination of a major political party, objected after being excluded from a debate, maintaining he met its polling requirements. However, now he says “It’s a problem of numbers. They figure Eight is Enough.” Unlike Johnson, who feels the GOP could have used their influence to include him, Karger sees it more as a network issue. He confirmed to Wikinews that he will not seek a third party nomination or run as an independent in 2012. He will remain in the GOP.

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November 16, 2011

Poll shows former U.S. Speaker Newt Gingrich as latest GOP presidential frontrunner

Poll shows former U.S. Speaker Newt Gingrich as latest GOP presidential frontrunner

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Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Newt Gingrich, the former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, has moved to first place among the field of Republican Party presidential candidates in the latest survey from Public Policy Polling (PPP). The poll, released on Monday, shows Gingrich with 28 percent support; three points ahead of businessman Herman Cain, and ten points ahead of former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney. The result reflects a thirteen point increase for Gingrich since last month’s PPP survey.

Gingrich in October 2011
Image: Gage Skidmore.

Gingrich, 68, represented the sixth congressional district of Georgia for twenty years (1979–1999), four of which were spent as Speaker (1995–1999). In 1995 he was named Time Magazines Man of the Year for his leadership in the Republican Party’s takeover of Congress. Since leaving Congress, he has worked in the private sector and academia.

Gingrich’s 2012 presidential campaign had a rocky start earlier this year. In May, during an interview on Meet the Press, he criticized a conservative-backed budget plan as “right-wing social engineering”, and later in the month, was reported to have sustained a hefty debt at Tiffany & Co. House Majority Leader Eric Cantor observed that “Many have said now he’s finished.” This summer, his campaign took its greatest hit when most of his campaign staff resigned. In July, Gingrich’s support fell to one percent in a Zogby International poll.

At this point, Gingrich tried to focus on the presidential debates. According to CNN, voters responded well to both his attacks on the media and his political ideas, including his new “Contract with America“, stylized after the document he helped draft ahead of the 1995 Republican takeover. In late September, Gingrich returned to double digits in a Fox News poll. In October, he raised $3 million.

According to the The Daily Caller, Gingrich’s latest surge likely came about from last week’s debate performances. However, it also coincides with the decreasing support for Herman Cain amid sexual harassment allegations. PPP determined that 73 percent of Cain supporters hold a favorable opinion of Gingrich, compared to 68 percent of all Republicans.

Analysts now consider Gingrich as the anti-Romney candidate, an alternative for conservatives who believe Mitt Romney is too liberal. This position had previously been filled by Representative Michele Bachmann, Texas governor Rick Perry, and most recently Herman Cain.

Gingrich hopes his message will resonate better with voters than the previous frontrunners, and that this will lead to his election.



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October 17, 2011

Herman Cain: SimCity rumor \’a lie\’

Herman Cain: SimCity rumor ‘a lie’ – Wikinews, the free news source

Herman Cain: SimCity rumor ‘a lie’

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Monday, October 17, 2011

Cain at the Values Voter Summit in October 2011.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

SimCity 4 cover.
Image: Maxis.

U.S. presidential candidate Herman Cain denied a suggestion from Huffington Post reporter Amanda Terkel that his 9-9-9 tax plan was derived from Maxis‘ 2003 computer game SimCity 4. During an interview that aired on The Rachel Maddow Show Friday, Cain bluntly characterized the suggestion as “a lie”.

Cain, the former CEO of Godfather’s Pizza, has risen to first place in some polls for the Republican Party‘s presidential nomination. His campaign features the 9-9-9 plan, which calls for the implementation of a 9 percent national sales tax, and a shift of the personal and corporate income tax rates to 9 percent.

Terkel compared Cain’s plan to that of the default setting on SimCity 4, which institutes a 9 percent rate for commercial, industrial and residential taxes. She contacted both Maxis and Rich Lowrie, a Wells Fargo employee credited with helping Cain formulate the plan. Though Lowrie did not respond, Maxis producer Kip Katsarelis commented:

We encourage politicians to continue to look to innovative games like SimCity for inspiration for social and economic change. While we at Maxis and Electronic Arts do not endorse any political candidates or their platforms, it’s interesting to see GOP candidate Herman Cain propose a simplified tax system like one we designed for the video game SimCity 4

Cain maintains that the plan is original. When probed on the issue, he remarked “that’s the difference when you become one or two in the polls. People make up stuff.”

Cain received similar attention in August after closing a GOP debate with a quote from the theme song for Pokemon: The Movie 2000, which he referenced to an unnamed poet. It was later reported that Cain had quoted the song on previous occasions.



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August 15, 2011

U.S. Presidential candidate Michele Bachmann narrowly edges Ron Paul in Ames Straw Poll

U.S. Presidential candidate Michele Bachmann narrowly edges Ron Paul in Ames Straw Poll

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Monday, August 15, 2011

Presidential candidates at the Ames Straw Poll. From left: Rick Santorum, Ron Paul, Thaddeus McCotter, Herman Cain and Michele Bachmann
Image: IowaPolitics.com.

Representative Michele Bachmann of Minnesota narrowly defeated fellow Representative Ron Paul of Texas to win the nonbinding Ames Straw Poll on Saturday. The poll, held every four years in Ames, Iowa is used as a gauge of Republican candidate viability several months ahead of the first-in-the-nation Iowa Caucuses. This year, nine candidates were listed on the ballot.

Bachmann, the first woman to ever win the poll, waged a high visibility campaign that benefited from persistent media coverage to win 4,823 of the 16,892 votes cast. Following the victory, she remarked to her supporters that “You have just sent a message that Barack Obama will be a one-term president.”

Paul, who tripled his support from the 2007 poll with 4,671 votes, took advantage of an enthusiastic grassroots following. His campaign manager commented that the result proves he “is moving into the first tier” of candidates.

Former Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty, whose traditional ground-campaign approach did not work as effectively as expected, came in a disappointing third place with 2,293 votes. Politico felt the showing “may spell the end of his campaign”, but Pawlenty argued that the campaign is “just beginning.” He later withdrew from the race.

The fourth place finish of former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania was seen as a “moral victory” for the candidate since he did not receive as much media coverage as the others, and did not spend as much cash. He vowed to remain in the race, stating “We have a caucus strategy, not a straw poll strategy…I don’t think there is any question that what we did here today shows that we are building a base of support in Iowa.”

Surprisingly, Texas governor Rick Perry, who entered the race on the same day as the poll, was not on the ballot but was still able to garner 718 write-in votes. That put him ahead of the Republican frontrunner, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, who was on the ballot but did not actively pursue the victory. He won the 2007 poll, but came in second to former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee in the Iowa caucuses.

Representative Thaddeus McCotter of Michigan, who paid $18,000 for campaign space, came in last place with 35 votes.

Results table

Michele Bachmann

Michele Bachmann

Michele Bachmann with her husband

Ron Paul

Ron Paul

Tim Pawlenty

Tim Pawlenty with his family

Rick Santorum with his family

Rick Santorum with his family

Herman Cain

Herman Cain

Thaddeus McCotter

Candidate Votes Percentage
Michele Bachmann 4,823 28.55%
Ron Paul 4,671 27.65%
Tim Pawlenty 2,293 13.57%
Rick Santorum 1,657 9.81%
Herman Cain 1,456 8.62%
Rick Perry (write-in) 718 3.62%
Mitt Romney 567 3.36%
Newt Gingrich 385 2.28%
Jon Huntsman, Jr. 69 0.41%
Thaddeus McCotter 35 0.21%



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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