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August 14, 2012

Students from Liceo María Luisa Bombal of Rancagua, Chile detained after taking control of school

Students from Liceo María Luisa Bombal of Rancagua, Chile detained after taking control of school

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Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Liceo María Luisa Bombal of Rancagua.
Image: Arsenalero.

San Fernando, Chile — Ten students from the Liceo María Luisa Bombal of Rancagua, O’Higgins Region were detained by the local police yesterday. Following their release, the students told the media they were required to remove their clothes at the police station.

The students, seven men and three women, took control of the building of the school early yesterday morning in response to the long delay in re-construction of the liceo, following the earthquake of 2010. At around 08:00 local time (1200 UTC), Leonardo Fuentes, general secretary of the Municipal Educational Corporation of Rancagua, authorized the police to clear out the students.

Pedro Larraín in October 2011.
Image: Diego Grez.

Student leader Jennifer Olivares told Diario VI Región the police “stripped off [their] clothes”((es)) upon their arrival at the police station, Comisaría de Rancagua, something which Lieutenant Colonel of Carabineros Iván Guajardo did not deny. However, police stated the students will be charged by the public prosecutor with robbing food from the school. “It’s a bit illogical that they stripped off our clothes, with the knowledge that there were minors and without [us] being delinquents, but students who took the school peacefully”((es)), said Olivares. Ignacio Muñoz, former leader of the occupation of the Liceo María Luisa Bombal, told El Rancahuaso “the Mayor [Eduardo Soto] promised to begin the reconstruction works last summer, and it’s August already and they don’t even begin to take the debris outside”((es)). Education Regional Secretary (Seremi de Educación) Pedro Larraín said the government “does not share”((es)) such actions, “because they harm education”((es)).

The Region of Libertador General Bernardo O’Higgins was one of the first in 2012 to resuscitate the previous year’s student protests, more specifically at the Liceo Industrial de San Fernando, which was taken control by the students in late July, and which as of yesterday was still taken. The students of the Liceo Industrial were particularly affected, after the president of the school’s centro de alumnos Guillermo Horta Farías was stabbed outside the educational establishment on July 31; his fellow schoolmates subsequently organized a march in his honour in Rancagua, on August 8. As of August 11, eight high schools have been taken control of by students, in response to the government’s failure to satisfy the secondary and university students’ requests.



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April 1, 2012

Roberto Córdova wins Concertación primary elections in Pichilemu, Chile

Roberto Córdova wins Concertación primary elections in Pichilemu, Chile

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Roberto Córdova won the primary elections. Pictured during an interview in November 2010.
Image: Diego Grez.

Sunday, April 1, 2012

Pichilemu, Chile – Incumbent mayor of the Chilean commune of Pichilemu, Roberto Córdova Carreño (Socialist Party) won the primary elections —qualified as “historic” by local newspaper Expreso de la Costa— to choose a unique candidate for mayor representing the Concertación de Partidos por la Democracia (Concert of Parties for Democracy) coalition of left-winged parties in the next municipal elections of October 28. The elections were held in the Digna Camilo Aguilar School. Córdova ran against incumbent councillor Andrea Aranda (Party for Democracy).

Anyone inscribed in the poll registry before November 30, 2011 and without membership in non-Concertación parties can participate in the election. Simultaneously, similar elections are were held in thirteen other communes of the O’Higgins Region, including regional capital Rancagua and Santa Cruz.

Both Aranda and Córdova participated on Saturday night in a televised debate hosted by municipal worker Fabricio Cáceres Jorquera in his program Cóctel de Sábado, broadcasted by Canal 3 Pichilemu.

The candidates

Roberto Córdova

Roberto del Carmen Córdova Carreño is the current mayor of the commune of Pichilemu. He was elected during a city council meeting in September 2009, after Mayor Marcelo Cabrera Martínez was forced to leave office permanently. Córdova is a Performance Engineer in Public Management.

Amongst other things, Córdova had to face the emergency triggered by the 2010 Chile earthquake and the subsequent Pichilemu earthquake. He also inaugurated the renovated Agustín Ross Cultural Centre with then-President Michelle Bachelet.

During his primary campaign, he reportedly visited rural areas such as Rodeíllo with a small group of people. His slogan is “Pichilemu, better every day.” (“Pichilemu, cada día mejor.”)

As reported by El Expreso de la Costa, he is supported by the regional president of the Party for Democracy (Aranda’s party) Leandro Sánchez, and senator Juan Pablo Letelier.

“In this voluntary but necessary election, I invite everyone [to vote] for Pichilemu to be better every day,” Córdova said to El Expreso.

Aranda in August 2011, during the Marcha por la Educación Gratuita in Pichilemu.
Image: Diego Grez.

Andrea Aranda

Andrea Natalia Aranda Escudero currently is one of the five councillors of Pichilemu, elected in 2008. She is married to Jorge Vargas, former Mayor of Pichilemu, with whom she has three daughters: Camila, Alicia, and Emilia. She is, by profession, a midwife.

She has been criticized by local media as following in the footsteps of her husband, Jorge Vargas, currently prohibited from active politics following his arrest for bribery.

Additionally, an anonymous editor of El Expreso de la Costa nicknamed Bellaco wrote: “[Aranda] assures her contender is campaigning with municipal funds, somebody asked, does she forget her husband made the same thing years before when he was elected for three terms?”

During her campaign, she visited places such as Cardonal de Panilonco, and organized several meetings with local leaders. Her slogan is “With woman’s strength.” (“Con fuerza de mujer.”)

Aranda wrote in an open letter published in El Expreso de la Costa: “As a woman, I’m sensitive to human necessity, and brave to defend the cause of family. My commitment is to work, providing all my capacities, for concrete works and materialization of dreams with you.”

Results

The primary elections were held at Digna Camilo Aguilar School.
Image: Diego Grez.

At 19:12 local time (22:12 UTC), regional newspaper El Pulso reported Córdova won the election, on Twitter.

The final results, as published by local TV channel Canal 3 Pichilemu on Twitter, are the following:

  • Roberto Córdova – 1,903 (73.1%)
  • Andrea Aranda – 699 (23.9%)
  • Total votes – 2,602 (100%)

Andrea Aranda said she “will continue to work for the people” and accused she was “the victim of a campaign of terror” against her. She later personally congratulated Roberto Córdova, who said “the election leaves several morals to local democracy,” and announced he would make an appeareance in Los Navegantes “to thank those who voted for him and those who did not.”



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October 24, 2010

Wikinews investigates the reconstruction of Pichilemu, Chile after February earthquake

Wikinews investigates the reconstruction of Pichilemu, Chile after February earthquake

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Sunday, October 24, 2010

A recently constructed kiosk with the new design. Image: Diego Grez. The original design of the kiosk, as shown in the plans by the Municipality. Image: Ilustre Municipalidad de Pichilemu.

Left: A recently constructed kiosk with the new design. Image: Diego Grez.
Right: The original design of the kiosk, as shown in the plans by the Municipality. Image: Ilustre Municipalidad de Pichilemu.

Eight months after a catastrophic earthquake, Wikinews has investigated the devastation caused in February and the reconstruction of Pichilemu, Chile. The February 27 earthquake and a subsequent tsunami completely destroyed Pichilemu’s most coastal street and its oldest villages. Wikinews has also had access to the original design plans of the new kiosks in Pichilemu, and conducted an interview with merchant Alejandro Mella, known locally as the King of the Cochayuyo (“El Rey del Cochayuyo”), who lost his kiosk after the earthquake.

Pichilemu is a coastal city in the O’Higgins Region of Chile, known as one of the “best surfing spots” in South America. Its current Mayor is Roberto Córdova Carreño, who was elected internally by the Councillors of the city in September 2009, after several political controversies that ended with three Mayors being displaced.

The territory of Pichilemu has a surface of 7,491 square kilometers, and comprises at least 24 villages, such as Ciruelos, Rodeíllo and Espinillo (the latter two also severely damaged by the March 11 earthquake). Pichilemu is the most popular beach in O’Higgins Region, and many tourists visit it every summer.

‘The house moved from side to side. I really thought it was going to fall’: First earthquake strikes

People in Pichilemu fled to La Cruz Hill, the village of Pueblo de Viudas, or simply they left the city, risking themselves because roads were very damaged. In the picture, people near Los Navegantes, going to La Cruz Hill.
Image: Diego Grez.

The earthquake took place in what is considered the “last weekend in the summer;” on Saturday, February 27, 2010 at 03:34 local time (06:34 UTC), while almost all Chileans were sleeping. Hours earlier, on Friday, thousands of people had arrived at Pichilemu. “The house moved from side to side. I really thought it was going to fall. It was 3 or 4 minutes long,” Diego Grez, a Chilean student who was in Pichilemu at the time of the quake, told Wikinews in an interview.

A concert was being held at the One Discotheque when the earthquake occurred. It is said that the audience panicked and fled outside the discothèque, and then to the La Cruz Hill. Most tourists fled outside the city right after the earthquake occurred, but many others opted to stay in the La Cruz Hill or the village of Pueblo de Viudas, which are the higher points in the city.

“Pichilemu is the symbolic beach resort in the Sixth Region [of O’Higgins], so it was not strange to even think that [during] the last weekend before the entrance to school, many people would be going to take advantage of it to take a vacation; and that’s what happened,” reported El Rancagüino, the most important newspaper in O’Higgins Region, on February 28.

Agustín Ross Balcony after the earthquake and tsunami.
Image: Diego Grez.

The only radio broadcasting in the area was Entre Olas, directed by Jorge Nasser, which also helped Pichileminians know what happened in other affected places by the earthquake, as they re-broadcasted the audio of Televisión Nacional de Chile (National Television of Chile). On the day of the earthquake, the station reported that a local police truck had crashed near La Cruz Hill. There was no tsunami warning, and Mayor Córdova was away on holiday when the earthquake struck.

“Those who live in Pichilemu, and those who were visiting it, were surprised by the giant waves that annihilated its beach and reached the city’s square, destroying everything on their way,” reported El Morrocotudo on February 28. “The most tough thing occurred when the firefighters’ alarms sounded twice, and the people in the hill began to yell ‘tsunami!’,” journalist Tania Arce told the newspaper.

The earthquake destroyed one of Pichilemu’s oldest and iconic buildings, the post office, which was demolished in July. The urban centre of Pichilemu was not severely damaged by the earthquake, but its subsequent tsunami caused most of the destruction. The Agustín Ross architecture in the city (three of his buildings are National Monuments of Chile) was damaged. Agustín Ross Balcony was completely destroyed.

‘It’s something unforgettable to me, I’m proud I saved all of those lives’

The tsunami destroyed most of Pichilemu’s coastal street establishments, including kiosks, restaurants and hotels. The picture shows the Donde Esaú Restaurant, which was severely damaged by both the tsunami and earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

According to SHOA, the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service of the Chilean Navy, the tsunami triggered by the earthquake first reached Pichilemu, at 03:48 (06:48 UTC). A second wave came at 04:15 (07:15 UTC).

Policeman José Arévalo was the only person to warn residents that a tsunami was approaching. Arévalo was patrolling the Las Terrazas beach, when the earthquake occurred. He told El Rancahuaso there were around 25 people in the beach. “Right after the quake, he noticed the sea had shrank around 500 meters inside. He took his megaphone, and shouted people should leave the place instantly.” “The sea is coming out! The sea is coming out!,” he shouted. “The warning was also preceived by nightclubs and pubs surrounding the costanera. Then, the tragedy occurred. The sea destroyed everything on its way,” El Rancahuaso reported. “It all was really quick. Everyone is safe, luckily [..] It’s something unforgettable to me, I’m proud I saved all of those lives,” Arévalo added.

The tsunami destroyed restaurants, hotels, kiosks, the Fishermen Store (Caleta de Pescadores), surf schools, the Agustín Ross Balcony (located right in front of the Las Terrazas beach) and houses near the costanera (the nearest street to the beach), and flooded the building of the Government of Cardenal Caro Province, the boarding school of Pichilemu, the city square (Arturo Prat Square), and the Supermarket El 9.

A local worker, Ricardo Vivanco, also known as “El Gordo” (“The Fat one”), almost was killed by a tsunami, ignoring warnings by the Police and the Fire Bureau. Vivanco was drunk, and went down to the Las Terrazas beach with his friends. The wave washed him away, and was hit on the Agustín Ross Balcony’s wall. His friends recorded a video and uploaded it to YouTube.

Damage in Punta de Lobos and villages

Punta de Lobos, Pichilemu’s most popular surfing beach, is located at about four kilometers south of the city’s centre.
Image: Diego Grez.

It was reported by Radio Entre Olas on February 27, that the tsunami had provoked massive damage in Punta de Lobos, Pichilemu’s most popular beach. The owner of Entre Mar, an hotel and restaurant in that beach, said the tsunami had destroyed all of his buildings there.

The village of Espinillo was badly damaged, and approximately 600 people were made homeless by the earthquake, Teletrece reported on March 16. “We are keeping the government informed, we’re also organized with some churches [sic, religious organizations] that are working voluntarily in Espinillo, Los Boldos, Alto Ramírez […] We thank a lot their work, that is not to give them mediaguas [temporary tenements], but something definitive, but I also think they need resources to do it,” Mayor Córdova said.

‘We are here because we fear about our safety’: Residents scramble after second earthquake

Many Pichileminians stayed in La Cruz Hill for several days after the March earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

On March 11, Chile was hit by a second earthquake, that reached a magnitude of 6.9, and that occurred 40 kilometers southwest of Pichilemu. It occurred at 11:39 local time (14:39 UTC), while the new President Sebastián Piñera was sworn in.

A tsunami warning was issued by SHOA, between Coquimbo and Los Lagos regions. People in Pichilemu fled again to La Cruz Hill. Military authorities assured people in the hill they were going to be safe there, and that it was unlikely a tsunami was going to hit again Chile’s coast. The tsunami warning was lifted at 15:50 local time (18:50 UTC).

People stayed in La Cruz Hill for a longer time than after the previous earthquake, and several activities were made there, such as a concert by Chilean-Brazilian singer Joe Vasconcellos. People were also given food, wood (mostly remains from the destroyed kiosks), and electricity.

“We are here because we fear about our safety. We don’t want it [a possible tsunami] to catch us. We have to settle down here and to accommodate,” Edith Larraín told to Wikinews. Mayor Córdova estimated that at least 2,000 people were staying at La Cruz Hill. Militaries and provincial authorities asked them to leave the hill on March 15, but most refused the deal. People eventually left the hill, due to complaints by the Mayor.

Eight months on, reconstruction begins

Caleta de Pescadores was destroyed almost completely after the earthquake and tsunami. The fishermen’s boats were thrown more than 200 meters away.
Image: Diego Grez.

On March 20, in collaboration with the Governor of Cardenal Caro Julio Ibarra, Colonel Raúl Melo, and the Mayor of Litueche Bernardo Cornejo, Mayor of Pichilemu Roberto Córdova announced a “tourism revival campaign” of Pichilemu, promoting the surf practice, whose goal was “to make the city go back to the normality.”

On April 4, the first monument was erected in memory of the earthquake and tsunami victims. The monument was created by local artisans, with rocks from several places of the Cardenal Caro Province. “We wanted to create this monument so we don’t forget it [the earthquake] […] This is the beginning of the reconstruction,” said Julio Ibarra. The monument was placed in front of the beach, near the building of the Cardenal Caro Government. Mayor Roberto Córdova said that “it definitely will help us reconstruct [ourselves] espiritually, [and that] is essential.”

On October 20, with the help of the Government, SERCOTEC (Technical Cooperation Service, Servicio de Cooperación Técnica) and FOSIS (Solidarity and Social Investment, Fondo de Solidaridad e Inversión Social), the Fishermen Store (Caleta de Pescadores) began to be reconstructed. Caleta de Pescadores is administered by the Independent Labour Union of Fishermen of Pichilemu (Sindicato de Trabajo Independientes de Pescadores Artesanales), which has twenty-three members.

“The Government of President Sebastián Piñera has been worried about the fishing area, carrying out several actions in help of them, after all that they’ve suffered after the earthquake and tsunami that hit them […] This area is working normally again,” Governor Ibarra said.

New kiosks; interview with Alejandro Mella

Alejandro Mella.
Image: Diego Grez.

On October 6, the Municipality of Pichilemu published the design of kiosks that were going to be constructed, as replacement of those destroyed by the earthquake. As of October 23, four kiosks have been constructed in Pichilemu, specifically on Las Terrazas beach, and two more are being constructed. According to Mauricio Grez, a construction engineer, the construction of one kiosk would cost up to US$ 2,500 (CLP 1,000,000).

Alejandro Mella, locally known as “el Rey del Cochayuyo” (“the King of the Cochayuyo”), is a merchant of Pichilemu, who promotes the cochayuyo (durvillaea antarctica), and lost his kiosk after the February earthquake and tsunami. “I was given my [former] kiosk by the Mayor Orlando Cornejo, back in 1993. It was right in front of us [in front of Las Terrazas beach, near “the grotto of the Virgin”], and was made smithereens by the tsunami,” he told Wikinews.

“I have always worked on selling cochayuyo here, and the terrain where my kiosk was located before has been disputed by private people, and the municipality approved that. I talked with the Mayor and he said ‘I don’t know what’s going on the beach’; that left me perplexed. […] I like the new design of the kiosks, they are larger, and we can do more things with it, but they are way too expensive,” he added. Mr. Mella also gave Wikinews a sample of his work as “the King of the Cochayuyo”, an essay called “El cochayuyo es una mina repleta de nutrientes y sales minerales” (“Cochayuyo is a mine full of nutrients and mineral salts”, pictured below), which he sells for 200 Chilean pesos (0.41 US$), and that contains “tips and information about the plant, and some recipes.”

A kiosk in Pichilemu, in 2007. The design is considerably different to the recently published one. Image: Diego Grez.

A kiosk in Pichilemu, in 2007. The design is considerably different to the recently published one.
Image: Diego Grez.

Isometrical view of the new Pichilemu kiosks. Image: Ilustre Municipalidad de Pichilemu.

Isometrical view of the new Pichilemu kiosks.
Image: Ilustre Municipalidad de Pichilemu.

Construction of kiosks in Las Terrazas Beach, on October 22. Image: Diego Grez.

Construction of kiosks in Las Terrazas Beach, on October 22.
Image: Diego Grez.

Front page of Alejandro Mella's essay Front page of Alejandro Mella’s essay “El cochayuyo es una mina repleta de nutrientes y sales minerales” (“Cochayuyo is a mine full of nutrients and mineral salts”), which he published under the nickname of “the king of the Cochayuyo of Pichilemu”.
Image: Alejandro Mella/Diego Grez.



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October 13, 2010

Copiapó, Chile mining accident: in depth

Copiapó, Chile mining accident: in depth

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Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Rescue efforts in the San José Mine, on August 10.
Image: desierto_atacama.

Laurence Golborne, Mining Minister of Chile.
Image: Ministerio Secretaría General de Gobierno de Chile.

The rescue of the Chilean miners trapped in the San José Mine in Copiapó, codenamed Operación San Lorenzo (San Lorenzo Operation), began on Tuesday night, at around 20:00 local time (23:00 UTC).

Florencio Ávalos was the first miner to be rescued, at 00:12 local time (03:12 UTC) on Wednesday. He was wearing a shirt signed by all his fellow miners. “The first miner is already with us. We saw it all, him hugging his wife Monica and his son Byron,” said President Piñera shortly after the first rescue. “We still have a long journey.”

“This will be recorded on every single Chilean heart forever,” Piñera added. “I hope the miners’ hope stay with us, just like the [February] earthquake victims’ [hope] and what the earthquake took off. We know that the disasters unite us all.”

All the 33 miners were rescued. The last miner, Luis Urzúa, was rescued at 21:55 Chile time (00:55 UTC). “It is a pleasure to be Chilean, [I’m] proud,” said Luis Urzúa to President Piñera. “In honour of the miners, their families, the rescuers […] let’s sing our national anthem. Viva Chile Mierda!,” said Piñera. Urzúa thanked Mining Minister Golborne and the First Lady Cecilia Morel for “fighting for their lives.” “I’m proud of my fellow miners,” Urzúa added.

Six rescuers, including a miner and a paramedic, descended to the miners’ shelter using the Fénix 3 capsule which was specially constructed for the rescue. They performed check-ups and talk with the miners before taking them back to the surface. The rescuers still don’t leave the mine.

The Fénix 3 capsules are 3.95 metres in height and weigh about 460 kilograms. They have an armour, an oxygen tube and a microphone. The occupants helmets contain an intercom to keep them in contact with the rescue team on the surface.

President of Chile Piñera assisted to the rescue. Bolivian President Evo Morales could not attend Carlos Mamani’s rescue. Mamani is the only Bolivian miner in the group.

A mass for the miners was conducted at 18:00 local time (21:00 UTC). The rescue takes between 15 and 20 minutes for each miner.

On Tuesday, Mayor of Copiapó Maglio Cicardini announced that the municipal schools in the city will have no classes this Wednesday “to transform the rescue of the Atacama’s 33 in a familiar meeting,” Radio Cooperativa reported.

“The miners will be taken to the Copiapó Regional Hospital for medical checkup, where they will have to stay for 48 hours,” Health Minister Mañalich said to Televisión Nacional de Chile.

Celebrations are taking place in several Chilean cities. In Santiago de Chile, people gathered in one of the most important points of the city, Plaza Italia. In Pichilemu, tens of cars are passing over its most important streets. In Copiapó, people gathered in its main square to assist a massive concert.

Background

Rescue worker Patricio Sepúlveda inside the Fénix capsule, before descending to the miners’ shelter.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

On August 5, 33 miners were trapped more than 700 meters (2,300 ft) underground, in the San José copper–gold mine, located about 40 kilometers north of Copiapó, Chile.

The youngest trapped miner is 19 years old, and the oldest is 63. There were several rescue attempts before reaching the miners’ shelter on August 22. The National Emergencies Office of Chile (ONEMI) released a list of the trapped miners on August 6, which included Franklin Lobos Ramírez, a retired footballer.

Chile is the worlds top producer of copper, according to The Economist. The San José Mine is owned by the San Esteban Mining Company (Empresa Minera San Esteban). The mine was closed down in 2007, after relatives of a miner who had died sued the company executives, but the mine was re–opened in 2008.

It was originally estimated that “it would take three to four months to complete the rescue of the trapped miners”. There were three plans to reach the miners: “Plan A” using a Strata 950 drill, “Plan B” using a Schramm T130XD drill, and “Plan C” using a RIG-422 drill. The first to reach the miners was “Plan B”, early on Saturday 9.

The last step of their rescue, announced by Health Minister Jaime Mañalich, was originally due to begin on Tuesday. Laurence Golborne, Minery Minister said “If it is possible, and the cement sets before and we don’t have any impediments to doing it, it would be wonderful,” in a press conference on Monday. The men will be extracted in a steel rescue capsule 54 cm (21 inches) in diameter.

On September 4, Chilean filmmaker Rodrigo Ortúzar announced plans to film a movie about the accident, called “Los 33” (“The 33”). The film will be released in 2011.

The miners

One miner is Bolivian, and the other 32 are Chilean.

Raúl Bustos

Raúl Bustos, 40 years old, is an hydraulics engineer. He left his job in Talcahuano after the February 27 earthquake to work in the mine.

Daniel Herrera

Daniel Herrera after his rescue.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Daniel Herrera, 27 years old, is a lorry driver. He has acted as paramedic assistant in the mine. He said to La Tercera “the miners were unhappy with the psychologist in the rescue team.”

Claudio Acuña

Claudio Acuña, miner, is fan of the Colo-Colo football club. The BBC reports he is aged 56, but El Comercio says he is 44.

Pedro Cortez

Pedro Cortez is aged 24. He joined the mine with his friend Carlos Bugueño. Cortez is an electrician, and lost a finger in the mine a year ago.

Juan Aguilar

File:Juan Aguilar with President Piñera.jpg

Juan Carlos Aguilar after he was rescued with President Sebastián Piñera. Aguilar’s shirt says “In his hand are the depths of the earth. And the heights of the hills are his;” “His is the Honor and the Glory.”
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

A native of Los Lagos, Juan Aguilar is 49 years old. Aguilar is married to Cristy Coronado, according to El Comercio. Aguilar works as a supervisor.

Mario Sepúlveda

Mario Sepúlveda is a 39 years old electrician native of Parral; he is married. He has been the spokesman of the most of the miners’ videos. Mario Sepúlveda was the second miner to be rescued, on Wednesday at 01:10 local time (04:10 UTC).

Víctor Zamora

Víctor Zamora is a 33 years old auto mechanic. Zamora is married to Jéssica Cortez, who confirmed she was pregnant while he was in the mine.

Osman Araya

Osman Araya is 30 years old, and married. He began working as miner four months before the accident.

Florencio Ávalos

Florencio Ávalos was the first miner to be rescued.
Image: Government of Chile TV.

Florencio Ávalos is 31 years old. He is the brother of Renán Ávalos, who is also trapped in the mine. He worked as driver in San José. Ávalos filmed videos, sent later to his relatives.

Ávalos was the first miner to be rescued, on Wednesday at 00:10 local time (03:10 UTC).

Jorge Galleguillos

Jorge Galleguillos, 56 years old, has worked all his life in the mine. He said in one video he was feeling unwell; he takes medication for hypertension.

Carlos Barrios

Carlos Barrios is a 27 years old miner. His father, Antenor Barrios, told Agence France-Presse: “I find he’s very strong and has enthusiasm. He spoke loud and clear. I was excited.”

Franklin Lobos

Franklin Lobos shortly after his rescue.
Image: Gabriel Ortega / Government of Chile.

Franklin Lobos Ramírez is a 53 years old retired footballer. He played for Cobresal, Deportes Antofagasta, Club de Deportes Santiago Wanderers and Unión La Calera, and briefly for the Chile national football team. Lobos had worked as a truck driver in the mine.

Yonni Barrios

Yonni Barrios, called “The Doctor”, is a 50 years old electrician. He has knowledge of first aid, and was given responsibility for monitoring the health of his colleagues. “I felt I was in hell,” Barrios said in a letter to his wife.

Carlos Bugueño

Carlos Bugueño, 27 years old, joined the mine with Pedro Cortez. Previously, he worked as a watchman.

Alex Vega

Miner Vega after being rescued at 08:53 local time (11:53 UTC).
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Alex Vega Salazar is a 31 years old heavy machinery mechanic. He is married to Jessica Salgado, and celebrated his birthday in the mine on September 22.

Ariel Ticona

Ariel Ticona is a 29 years old miner. His wife, Margarita gave birth to his daughter on September 14. She was named Esperanza (Hope), at Ticona’s request.

Richard Villarroel

Richard Villarroel is a 27 years old mechanic from Coyhaique.

Edison Peña

Edison Peña is a 34 years old miner. “I want to go out soon,” he said on his first contact with his relatives. “I want to be free, I want to see the sun,” he added. He is a fan of Elvis Presley.

Claudio Yáñez

Claudio Yáñez is 34 years old, and works as drill operator.

José Ojeda

José Ojeda leaving the Fénix capsule.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

José Ojeda, 46 years old, is the master driller. Ojeda is widowed and diabetic.

Luis Urzúa

Luis Urzúa is a 54 year old topographer. He is the shift-leader, and was the first miner to talk with authorities. He is known as Don Lucho among the miners. He draw plans of the area of the mine where they are trapped.

Urzúa will be the last miner to leave the mine.

José Henríquez

José Henríquez is a 54 years old drill master. He is also an evangelical preacher, and has worked in mines for 33 years.

Víctor Segovia

Víctor Segovia was the fifteenth miner to be rescued.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Víctor Segovia is a 48 years old electrician. He is in charge of writing down everything that happens in the mine.

Pablo Rojas

Pablo Rojas is a 45 years old explosives loader. Married, he had been working less than six months in the mine.

Juan Illanes

Juan Illanes is a 51 year old miner. He was a sergeant in the Beagle border conflict between Chile and Argentina in 1978, the incident which almost provoked a war between the countries.

Illanes was rescued on Wednesday, at 02:07 local time (05:07 UTC).

Jimmy Sánchez

Jimmy Sánchez, 19, is the youngest miner. He had been working in the mine for five months before the accident. His role is to check the temperature and humidity in the mine.

Samuel Ávalos

Samuel Ávalos is a 43 years miner. His wife Ruth said “he was addicted to the cocaine.” His role in the rescue is to check air quality in the area the miners are living. According to the BBC, “Ávalos has worked in the mine for five months.”

Mario Gómez

Mario Gómez, the oldest miner was rescued at 08:00 local time (11:00 UTC).
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Mario Gómez, aged 63, is the oldest of the miners. He has worked 51 years as miner. His father was also a miner, and is nicknamed “El Navegao” (“The Sailed One”). He was thinking of retiring in November.

Gómez also wrote the message “Estamos bien en el refugio los 33” (“We are fine in the shelter the 33 [of us]”).

Darío Segovia

Segovia is 48 years old. He is married to Jessica Chille, who said “To hear his voice was a confort to my heart,” after talking with him for the first time in 24 days. His sister María, was nicknamed “La Alcaldesa” (“The Mayoress”) for her leading role at Campamento Esperanza. His father, Darío Senior, was trapped in a mine for a week, and suffered serious injuries after two other mining accidents, according to the BBC.

Carlos Mamani

Carlos Mamani is a 23 years old heavy equipment operator. He is also the only non-Chilean miner; Mamani is Bolivian. He began working in the mine just five days before the accident.

He was rescued at 03:11 local time (06:11 UTC) on Wednesday.

Renán Ávalos

Renán Ávalos after his rescue.
Image: Gabriel Ortega / Government of Chile.

Renán Ávalos is a 29 years old miner, single, who had been working for five months in the mine before the accident. Florencio Ávalos is his brother.

Omar Reygadas

Omar Reygadas is a 56 year old electrician. He began working in the mine shortly before the accident.

Esteban Rojas

Esteban Rojas is a 44 years old miner. Rojas is married to Jessica Yáñez.



Related news

  • Chilean miners rescue to begin on Tuesday, Minister Mañalich announces” — Wikinews, October 9, 2010
  • “Rodrigo Ortúzar announces plans to dramatize Chilean miners’ stories” — Wikinews, September 4, 2010
  • “Race to save Chilean miners trapped underground from spiralling into depression continues” — Wikinews, September 2, 2010
  • “Chilean miners trapped after mine collapse; miscalculated drilling delays rescue” — Wikinews, August 11, 2010

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September 2, 2010

Two thousand people use bodies to create message on Pichilemu beach

Two thousand people use bodies to create message on Pichilemu beach

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Pichilemu
Pichilemu stories
Location of Pichilemu in the O’Higgins Region

Thursday, September 2, 2010

Official picture of the event. Text reads “Viva Chile[:] Bicentennial [in] Cardenal Caro“.
Image: Philip Muller.

More than two thousand people assembled at the Las Terrazas beach in Pichilemu to create the message “Viva Chile: Bicentenario Cardenal Caro” (English: “Viva Chile: Bicentennial [in] Cardenal Caro”) using their bodies.

Julio Ibarra, the governor of Cardenal Caro, organized the event in two days, gathering people from schools, neighborhood councils, Huasos clubs, surfers, and policemen.

People started to arrive at the beach at around 10:00 AM local time (1400 UTC). Ibarra said to Radio Universidad de Chile that “the objective of the activity was to create a post that will be distributed all around the world.”

Pichileminian Huasos created the sentence “Viva Chile,” and other schools created letters of “Bicentenario” and “Cardenal Caro.” Graciela Vargas Urzúa, teacher from Colegio Preciosa Sangre, said that “it was a beautiful experience that [she] had never seen before in Pichilemu.”

The pictures were taken by photographer Philip Muller, in an Army helicopter.

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May 3, 2010

Chilean earthquakes in the O\’Higgins Region: photoessay

Chilean earthquakes in the O’Higgins Region: photoessay

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Monday, May 3, 2010

The recent string of earthquakes in Chile caused widespread damage to buildings. Wikinews reporter Diego Grez is on-scene and in his second photoessay, he shows us the impact of the earthquake in the O’Higgins Region and takes a look at how people living in the area have reacted to the devastation.


Wikinews' Diego Grez in front of the well-known apartments of Paniahue, Santa Cruz, Chile, that fell down during the earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Wikinews’ Diego Grez in front of the well-known apartments of Paniahue, Santa Cruz, Chile, that collapsed during the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

The urban centre of Pichilemu has become dead since the earthquake, because of the fear of a new tsunami there. Image: Diego Grez.

The urban centre of Pichilemu has been dead since the earthquake, because of the fear of a new tsunami there.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Church of Santa Cruz was severely damaged in the earthquake and is being slowly demolished. Picture at the top right is the Church, as it looked in December 2009. Image: Diego Grez.

The Church of Santa Cruz was severely damaged in the earthquake and it is being demolished slowly. Picture at the top right is the Church, as it looked in December 2009.
Image: Diego Grez.

Inside the first floor of an apartment in Paniahue, Santa Cruz. Image: Diego Grez.

Inside the first floor of an apartment in Paniahue, Santa Cruz.
Image: Diego Grez.

Residents of Paniahue, Santa Cruz took their belongings and went to an empty plot near the apartments. They have named it

Residents of Paniahue, Santa Cruz took their belongings and went to an empty plot near the apartments. They have named it “Villa Los Ciruelos”.
Image: Diego Grez.

Residents of Paniahue also went to a court near the apartments, where they are storing their belongings and camping. Image: Diego Grez.

Residents of Paniahue also went to a court near the apartments, where they are storing their belongings and camping.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Peralillo town hall collapsed after the earthquake. News media has reported that the Mayor of Peralillo, Gerardo Cornejo, started to cry when he saw the town hall, but his father, 90 years-old, motivated him to get Peralillo up again. Old buildings like the Church of Peralillo also collapsed. Image: Diego Grez.

The Peralillo town hall collapsed after the earthquake. News media has reported that the Mayor of Peralillo, Gerardo Cornejo, started to cry when he saw the town hall, but his father, 90 years-old, motivated him to get Peralillo up again. Old buildings such as the Church of Peralillo also collapsed.
Image: Diego Grez.

People and tourists that were staying in Pichilemu for the last weekend in the summer, quickly drove to the nearest hill, La Cruz. Image: Diego Grez.

People and tourists that were staying in Pichilemu for the last weekend in the summer quickly drove to the nearest hill, La Cruz.
Image: Diego Grez.

A toilet in a collapsed apartment building in Paniahue, Santa Cruz. Image: Diego Grez.

A toilet in a collapsed apartment building in Paniahue, Santa Cruz.
Image: Diego Grez.

A collage of pictures showing the damage to the Paniahue apartment buildings. Image: Diego Grez.

A collage of pictures showing the damage to the Paniahue apartment buildings.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Arturo Prat Square in Pichilemu shortly after the earthquake and tsunami. Image: Diego Grez.

The Arturo Prat Square in Pichilemu shortly after the earthquake and tsunami.
Image: Diego Grez.

Carts in the Pichilemu beach before the earthquake and tsunami.The place where the carts were before the earthquake.

The tsunami threw these carts more than a block away. First picture in 2009.
Image: Diego Grez.
A collapsed house in Paniahue, Santa Cruz, Chile. Image: Diego Grez.

A collapsed house in Paniahue, Santa Cruz, Chile.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Santa Cruz town hall after the 2010 Chile earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

The Santa Cruz town hall after the 2010 Chile earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

A house located on O'Higgins Avenue, Santa Cruz, Chile after the earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

A house located on O’Higgins Avenue, Santa Cruz, Chile after the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

A house in Pichilemu, Chile. A fissure can be seen clearly. Image: Diego Grez.

A house in Pichilemu, Chile. A fissure can be clearly seen.
Image: Diego Grez.

The place where the Colchagua museum was located before the 2010 Chile earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

The location of the Colchagua museum prior to the 2010 Chile earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

Another destroyed house in Santa Cruz, Chile by the 2010 Chile earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Another destroyed house in Santa Cruz, Chile by the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

A demolished house in Santa Cruz, Chile, after the 2010 Chile earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Another house in Santa Cruz destroyed by the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

A house damaged by the 2010 Chile earthquake, in Santa Cruz. Image: Diego Grez.

A house damaged by the 2010 Chile earthquake, in Santa Cruz.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Lolol firefighters building after the earthquakes. Image: Diego Grez.

The Lolol firefighters building after the earthquakes.
Image: Diego Grez.

A Lolol house, severely affected by the earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

A Lolol house, severely affected by the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

Another Lolol house after the earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Another Lolol house after the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

Liquor store on Errázuriz Avenue in Santa Cruz, Chile. Image: Diego Grez.

Liquor store on Errázuriz Avenue in Santa Cruz, Chile.
Image: Diego Grez.

Stores on the main street in Marchigüe after the earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Stores in the Marchigüe main street after the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

A house damaged by the 2010 earthquake in Santa Cruz, Chile. Image: Diego Grez.

A house damaged by the 2010 earthquake in Santa Cruz, Chile.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Naval Bridge, near Lolol, was severely damaged after the earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

The Naval Bridge, near Lolol, was severely damaged after the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

The ground broke in many places in Santa Cruz, Chile. Picture taken near the newly built Escuela de Lenguaje (Language School, for those with learning problems, like dyslexia), that was severely affected. Image: Diego Grez.

The ground broke in many places in Santa Cruz, Chile. Picture taken near the newly built Escuela de Lenguaje (Language School, for those with learning problems, like dyslexia), that was severely affected.
Image: Diego Grez.

People with a bonfire in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu, Chile, after the March 11 earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

People with a bonfire in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu, Chile, after the March 11 earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

Demolition of a house in Santa Cruz, Chile. Image: Diego Grez.

Demolition of a house in Santa Cruz, Chile.
Image: Diego Grez.

An old house in the urban centre of Santa Cruz, Chile. Image: Diego Grez.

An old house in the urban centre of Santa Cruz, Chile.
Image: Diego Grez.

House that served as refuge for old people until 1978, severely affected by the earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

A house that served as a refuge for old people until 1978 was severely affected by the earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.



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Sister links

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March 18, 2010

Chilean earthquakes: in pictures

Chilean earthquakes: in pictures – Wikinews, the free news source

Chilean earthquakes: in pictures

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Thursday, March 18, 2010

On the Feb. 27, Chile was hit by an magnitude 8.8 earthquake; almost 500 were killed, with resulting tsunami destroying most coastal towns between Llolleo and Araucanía Region. A second earthquake last week, with its epicentre in Pichilemu, caused destruction in the Coquimbo and Bío Bío regions.

A Wikinews contributor is in the area, and we look at the extent of this natural disaster’s damage through his photographs.


People camping in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu. They even constructed little houses, to make their stay more comfortable. Image: Diego Grez.

People camping in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu. They even constructed little houses, to make their stay more comfortable.
Image: Diego Grez.

Church of Santa Cruz, after the February earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Church of Santa Cruz, after the February earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Arturo Prat square before and after the earthquake and tsunami in Pichilemu. Image: Diego Grez.

The Arturo Prat square before and after the earthquake and tsunami in Pichilemu.
Image: Diego Grez.

Boat after the tsunami in Pichilemu. Image: Diego Grez.

Boat after tsunami in Pichilemu.
Image: Diego Grez.

Military representatives in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu after the March earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Military representatives in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu, after the March earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

On-scene soldiers on a truck, in Lolol, after the March earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

On-scene soldiers on a truck, in Lolol, after the March earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed balustrades and the ceiling of a kiosk over another balustrade, near Pichilemu beach. Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed balaustrades and the ceiling of a kiosk over another balaustrades, near the beach of Pichilemu.
Image: Diego Grez.

Lolol church after the March earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Lolol church after the March earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses in Lolol were declared Historic Monuments of Chile. This is one of many that are going to be demolished. Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses in Lolol were declared Historic Monuments of Chile. This is one of many that are going to be demolished.
Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed building Mirador by the tsunami in Pichilemu, and also by a kiosk/container. Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed building Mirador by the tsunami in Pichilemu, and also by a kiosk/container.
Image: Diego Grez.

Cars driving to La Cruz Hill in Pichilemu, a few hours after the disaster. Image: Diego Grez.

Cars driving to La Cruz Hill in Pichilemu, a few hours after the disaster.
Image: Diego Grez.

Chilean singer Joe Vasconcellos did a free solo tour in Chile after the Pichilemu and Maule earthquakes. Pictured is his performance in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu. Image: Diego Grez.

Chilean singer Joe Vasconcellos did a free solo tour in Chile after the Pichilemu and Maule earthquakes. Pictured during his performance in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu.
Image: Diego Grez.

House in front of the Main Beach of Pichilemu after the tsunami and earthquake combo. Image: Diego Grez.

House in front of the Main Beach of Pichilemu after the tsunami and earthquake combo.
Image: Diego Grez.

Bucalemu was severely impacted by the February tsunami and earthquake; this picture taken after the March temblor. Image: Diego Grez.

Bucalemu was severely impacted by the February tsunami and earthquake; this picture taken after the March temblor.
Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses were destroyed after the earthquake in Lolol because they were old and made with rustic materials. Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses were destroyed after the earthquake in Lolol, because they were old and made with rustic materials.
Image: Diego Grez.

Another destroyed house, a few meters behind the Lolol church. Image: Diego Grez.

Another destroyed house, a few meters behind the Lolol church.
Image: Diego Grez.

Pichilemu highway, the day of the earthquake and tsunami. Image: Diego Grez.

Pichilemu highway, the day of the earthquake and tsunami.
Image: Diego Grez.

Most of the balustrades around  Ross Park in Pichilemu were destroyed after the 2010 Pichilemu earthquake. Image: Diego Grez.

Most of the balustrades aroundRoss Park, in Pichilemu, were destroyed after the 2010 Pichilemu earthquake.
Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed kiosks after the tsunami in Pichilemu. Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed kiosks after the tsunami in Pichilemu.
Image: Diego Grez.

Just one kiosk and some bathrooms in front of the Arturo Prat Square survived the tsunami in Pichilemu. Image: Diego Grez.

Just one kiosk and some bathrooms in front of the Arturo Prat Square survived the tsunami in Pichilemu.
Image: Diego Grez.

The Cahuil Bridge was severely damaged after both quakes. It is broken in half and is a serious danger to motorists. Image: Diego Grez.

The Cahuil Bridge was severely damaged after both quakes. It is broken in half and is a serious danger to motorists.
Image: Diego Grez.

Several houses were destroyed in the town of Bucalemu, almost 40 kilometers from Pichilemu. In this picture, a house located in front of the beach was later thrown in the half of the roadway. Image: Diego Grez.

Several houses were destroyed in the town of Bucalemu, almost 40 kilometers from Pichilemu. In this picture, a house located in front of the beach was later thrown in the half of the roadway.
Image: Diego Grez.

Cobquecura, epicentre of the February earthquake.

Cobquecura, the epicentre of the February quake.

The building Alto Río, in Concepción, collapsed after the February earthquake. Image: Claudio Núñez.

The building Alto Río, in Concepción, collapsed after the February earthquake.
Image: Claudio Núñez.

A severely damaged building in Maipú. Image: Jorge Barrios.

A severely damaged building in Maipú.
Image: Jorge Barrios.

Collapsed Vespucio Norte Express Highway in Santiago, after the February earthquake.

Collapsed Vespucio Norte Express Highway in Santiago, after the February earthquake.

The damaged Museum of Contemporary Art, after the February earthquake.

The damaged Museum of Contemporary Art, after the February earthquake.

Aftermath of the February earthquake and tsunami in San Antonio. Image: Atilio Leandro.

Aftermath of the February earthquake and tsunami in San Antonio.
Image: Atilio Leandro.

Damaged Autopista del Maipo, near the city of Chada. Image: Lufke.

Damaged Autopista del Maipo, near the city of Chada.
Image: Lufke.

People trying to buy gasoline, in Chillán. Image: JOjo Jose Tomas.

People trying to buy gasoline, in Chillán.
Image: JOjo Jose Tomas.

Fire in the University of Concepción, after the February earthquake.

Fire in the University of Concepción, after the February earthquake.

Destroyed houses in the Maule Region. Image: Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Destroyed houses in the Maule Region.
Image: Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Fire in a plastics factory, in Ruta 5 Norte.

Fire in a plastics factory, in Ruta 5 Norte.

Chillán's Medialuna, after the February earthquake.

Chillán’s Medialuna after the February earthquake.

House in Pelluhue after the February temblor. Image: Caritas Linares.

House in Pelluhue after the February temblor.
Image: Caritas Linares.

US President Barack Obama holds a conference call from the Situation Room of the White House concerning the February earthquake.

US President Barack Obama holds a conference call from the White House Situation Room.

President Sebastián Piñera visits ONEMI after the February quake. Image: Sebastián Piñera E..

President Sebastián Piñera visits ONEMI after the February quake.
Image: Sebastián Piñera E..

Zones affected by the February earthquake. Image: B1mbo.

Zones affected by the February earthquake.
Image: B1mbo.

Map of Chile showing the epicenter of the February quake.

Map of Chile showing the epicenter of the February quake.

USGS shake map of the February earthquake.

USGS shake map of the February earthquake.

USGS shake map of the March earthquake.

USGS intensity map of the March earthquake.

USGS intensity map for the most strong aftershock of the temblor. Image: USGS.

USGS intensity map for the most strong aftershock of the temblor.
Image: USGS.

An animation showing the movement of tsunami waves caused by the temblor. (view large version)
Image: NOAA Center for Tsunami Research.


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Wikipedia has more about this subject:
2010 Chile earthquake
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Wikipedia has more about this subject:
2010 Pichilemu earthquake


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