Wiki Actu en

July 24, 2012

Small Texas town hosts large baseball tournament

Small Texas town hosts large baseball tournament

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

The Texas city of Chandler, with a modest population of just over 2,700, is hosting the Texas Teenage Baseball-Softball Association’s 8U [age 8 and under] Boys State Tournament. The event’s opening ceremony was held on Sunday July 22nd. Some of the city’s citizens have expressed excitement about and anticipation of the tournament for several weeks.

Mayor Ann Hall (foreground) prepares to address attendees at opening ceremony.

Including players and coaches, about 800 people attended the opening ceremonies, which began at 7pm CDT at the Winchester Park baseball complex and were led by the city’s Mayor, Ann Hall. Local businesses sponsored a hotdog supper at the complex before the ceremony. Overall, the tournament is to feature all 17 teams competing in about 40 games. Games are set to start at 8:30am each day, and play through 11:00pm nightly.

Members of the Brownwood Blue Jays prepare to accept souvenir bags from the city’s Mayor.

During the opening ceremony, teams lined up along the main competition field and each player and coach received a souvenir bag provided by the city of Chandler. The lead-up to the ceremony also featured a Kids Zone area with water slides, and bounce houses and a dunking booth staffed by coaches from the visiting teams.

The city’s major, Ann Hall, welcomed the team to Chandler and wished them salutations during their tournament play.

Kids Zone area at the tournament.

Players and coaches gather at the closing of the opening ceremony.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


External links

TTAB’s main site: http://www.texasteenage.org/pages.aspx/Home

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 25, 2012

Softball Australia, federal government reaffirm support for indigenous softball

Softball Australia, federal government reaffirm support for indigenous softball

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Sunday, March 25, 2012

man holding softball

Andrew Leigh speaks before last night’s Aussie Spirit game against Japan
Image: Laura Hale.

man holding softball

Andrew Leigh preparing to throw out the first pitch at before last night’s Aussie Spirit game against Japan
Image: Laura Hale.

woman

Aboriginal softballer Stacey Porter during Wednesday’s game
Image: Laura Hale.

Hawker, Canberra — Last night at the Hawker International Softball Centre, Softball Australia, the Australian Sport Commission and the Federal Government through Andrew Leigh reaffirmed their support of indigenous softball, the most popular sport for indigenous women.

Their support was part of a number of activities to celebrate indigenous softball prior to the start of two games between the Aussie Spirit and the Japan women’s national softball team including a demonstration game between youth teams from the Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales, a cultural performance, and several speakers including Leigh, an Aboriginal elder from the Ngunnawal tribe, and a representative from the Australian Sport Commission.

All speakers paid tribute to the traditional landowners.

Leigh was at the event on behalf of Kate Lundy who was unable to attend because of additional duties as a result of her ministerial portfolio increasing. He said the federal government was committed to making softball the sport of choice for the indigenous community as sport helps keep people fit. After his speech, he was presented with a bat painted by an Aboriginal artist.

The speaker from the Australian Sport Commission echoed Leigh’s message, saying one of their goals was to see more Australian Aboriginal membership on Australian national teams.

Indigenous competitors represent Australia at the highest level in softball, with two aboriginal players on the Australia women’s national softball team, Vanessa Stokes and Stacey Porter, and one aboriginal player on the Australian men’s national softball team, Jeff Goolagong.

Softball Australia has made a commitment to indigenous Australian involvement, not just player participation, but in leadership roles, with 183 indigenous Australians involved in these roles across all levels of Softball Australia. Everyone is involved in increasing participation across gender lines, and in the coming year, they will support over one hundred programs for the community.

The game was also attended by Japan’s ambassador to Australia. Leigh threw the ceremonial first pitch for the game.




Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 24, 2012

Japan beats Aussie Spirit in first two games of series

Japan beats Aussie Spirit in first two games of series

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Women playing softball

Jodie Stevenson of the Aussie Spirit during game one.
Image: LauraHale.

Hawker, Canberra — Wednesday night, the Japan women’s national softball team picked up victories in the first two games of their international test series against Australia by scores of 3-2 and 5-3.

Women playing softball

Aussie Spirit player during game one. Also pictured number 11 Rie Nishiyama of Japan.
Image: LauraHale.

The first game, at 17:30 AEST (6:30 UTC), began with Vanessa Stokes pitching for Australia. Japan’s third batter in the first inning, Rie Nishiyama, was walked. Yuikiyo Mine was next to bat, and a wild pitch allowed Nishiyama second base. Mine went on to hit a double on a long hit to the outfield, which enabled Nishiyama to score the only point of the first, as Japan went in 1-0 up.

In Australia’s half of the first, batters faced Yamato Fujita. Stacey Porter led off with a hit. Verity Long-Droppert bunted out but advanced Porter to second. Brenda De Blaes came up to bat and Porter stole third base. De Blaes was then walked. Chelsea Forkin made a base hit, scoring Porter. Stevenson got a hit to load the bases. The first ended when Jodie Bowering hit a pop out that was converted into a double play.

Japan went scoreless in the top of the second. In Australia’s half, Clare Warwick led off, hit the ball into her own leg and worked off the pain. The Japanese pitcher subsequently walked her. Stacey McManus flied out. Bowering bunted out but advanced Warwick. Porter was walked. Long-Droppert came to bat with runners on first and second, got hit by ball and took her base. During De Blaes’s at bat, there was a wild pitch that allowed a run to score. De Blaes hit a bouncer to the outfield, and was thrown out on a fielder’s choice to end the inning 2-1 for Australia.

Woman in profile

Leigh Godfrey of the Aussie Spirit during game one.
Image: LauraHale.

The Japanese answered back during the top of the third. Stokes was still pitching for Australia when a run scored. The game remained scoreless until the top of the seventh. Designated player Yukina Seki led off the inning by being struck out. Yamada hit a triple. Right fielder Kawano was thrown out at first but scored Yamada to bring the game to 3-2. Mani Souma made a base hit to get second. The inning ended when Kazuki Watanabe struck out. Australia was not able to answer back in the bottom half of the seventh and lost the game.

The second game originally had a scheduled start time of 19:30 AEST (8:30 UTC) but did not get underway until 20:05 AEST (9:05 UTC). The game was scoreless going into the top of the fourth, with two outs, when Shizuyo Hamamoto hit a home run for Japan. Haruka Fujino then was out to end the inning. The Japanese would score again in the top of the fifth. Australia answered back in their half of the inning. Melinda Weaver led off with a double. Warwick made a hit, advanced the runner to third but was ultimately out in a run out. Stacey Porter was walked. Michelle Cox hit out but not before advancing the runner to second. De Blaes hit a double to score two runs and tie the game up. Leigh Godfrey went out and the inning ended.

The game remained tied at the end of regulation play. International rules for ties were used. These involved a runner starting on second. Each side would score in their half of the inning, to bring the game to 3-3 after eight. At the top of the ninth, Japanese player Hamamoto started on second. Nishiyama grounded out but advanced Hamamoto to third. Haruna Sakamoto was walked. Hamamoto went home on a wild pitch during Misa Okubo’s at bat that also saw Nishiyama advance to third. This brought the game to 4-3. Okubo singled to score Nishiyama bringing the score to 5-3. The next two batters went out to end the inning. Australia was unable to answer back in the bottom of the ninth.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 23, 2012

Australian softball player Kahu Kapea ready for International Youth Cup

Australian softball player Kahu Kapea ready for International Youth Cup

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Wikinews Sports
Sports icon.png
Other sports stories
  • 7 July 2015: England defeats Germany 1-0 in FIFA Women’s World Cup 2015 third place playoff
  • 6 July 2015: Chile beats Argentina to win first Copa America title
  • 4 July 2015: Peru defeats Paraguay 2-0 in Copa America 2015 third place playoff
  • 2 July 2015: Argentina defeats Paraguay 6-1 in Copa America 2015 semi-finals
  • 2 July 2015: Francesc Solé wins Andorra Ultra Trail again

Friday, March 23, 2012

Hawker, Canberra — Australian Capital Territory (ACT) U15 representative Kahu Kapea is gearing up for the International Youth Cup tomorrow in Sydney where she is to play in an international match against a Japanese U15 side. Wikinews caught up with her between a double header at the Hawker International Softball Centre where Australia women’s national softball team played Japan women’s national softball team.

Kahu Kapea at the Australian test match in Canberra
Image: LauraHale.

She was not aware that softball had been played at the Olympics until recently and has no particular desire to play in the Games, though she has ambitions to make the national team. Which country is a bit of an issue. Kapea’s preference is for Australia but she is half Australian and half New Zealander so she could play for either team and her father would not mind seeing her representing the Kiwis.

The Sydney born Kapea plays softball, soccer, and does dance, but she sees softball as her future. It is the sport she excels the most at, both her parents played the game, and many family friends are involved with the sport. She started playing the game as a five or six year old, filling in for a youth teeball team coached by a family friend that needed players to fill in the squad.

Kapea, the youngest and tallest member of the current ACT Gold side, has represented the ACT and local clubs in competitions that have given her opportunities to travel to Sydney and Melbourne. She played for ACT at the School Sport Australia National Championship last year in Melbourne.

When asked if she faced any discrimination because she is half Maori and softball is traditionally a game for white girls, she said no. Her teammates were all tremendously supportive and hung out together as a group. If other softballers on the boys team or elsewhere in ACT softball made any comments, her teammates would correct them. Kapea said the ACT softball community was like a family.

She and other ACT softball players are to be at the Junior International Challenge on Saturday at the Blacktown Inernational Softball Centre.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 22, 2012

NZ Junior Black Socks win 2 in Canberra against the ACT

NZ Junior Black Socks win 2 in Canberra against the ACT

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, March 22, 2012

An ACT player at bat
Image: LauraHale.

Hawker, Canberra — The visiting New Zealand Junior Black Sox beat the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) boys U15 team 10-1 and 12-5 in two games last night played at the Hawker International Softball Centre.

The match was part of a training camp in advance of a tournament. New Zealand dominated the game. Auckland’s Marshall Layt-Maynarf pitched for New Zealand in the second game.

Layt-Maynarf pitching for New Zealand’s Jr Black Socks during game two
Image: LauraHale.

New Zealand has long been a power in men’s softball. When the New Zealand’s junior players were asked how they won so easily when Australia has been so dominant in the past few years, they replied Australia’s open men’s team has been able to win based on the strength of one pitcher. When a representative of Softball ACT was asked about this, they confirmed this but said Australia dominated because of not one pitcher, but two. One of those pitchers, Adam Folkard, has the best pitching speed in the world in the men’s game and plays for the ACT.

After their games wound up, the New Zealand players watched the second match of the Australia versus New Zealand test series. They socialized with the Australian locals but most left before the second match concluded at 22:45 AEST (11:45 UTC).

New Zealand will go to Sydney to compete in junior international challenge in Sydney this Saturday.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 20, 2012

Japanese national team decisively beats ACT 10-0 in four innings

Japanese national team decisively beats ACT 10-0 in four innings

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Hawker, Australian Capital Territory — Tonight, in the second match against the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) team before they play a three game test series against the Australia women’s national softball team, the Japan women’s national softball team beat the ACT team by a score of 10-0 after four innings when the game officially ended. Coaches for both teams and the umpires agreed to play to the traditional seven inning ending because the match was a friendly training match.

ACT players during the lineup announcement before the start of the game
Image: LauraHale.

An ACT batter takes a look at a pitch
Image: LauraHale.

The Japanese team arrived three hours before the start of the game and trained on another field. They moved to the field the game was to be played on 45 minutes before the scheduled start. The ACT team arrived about an hour early and did not take the field to warm up until a half hour before the scheduled start.

Australian national team pitcher Kaia Parnaby started the game for the ACT and had a poor outing. The top of the first started with a single Eri Yamada, and Yukina Seki bunting herself to first and progressing the base runner. Shizuyo Hamamoto hit a double which scored both base runners. This was then followed up by three successive outs by Haruka Fujino, Haruna Sakamoto, and Mika Suzuki. In the ACT’s half of the inning with Saturi Yamane pitching to them, Australian national team member and Olympic bronze medalist Brenda De Blaes had an infield groundout to short, Brit Tully bunted herself into an out, and Clare Currie hit an infield ground out to end the inning 2-0 Japan.

Parnaby had more trouble in the second inning, where she hit two batters and four runs scored. In the ACT’s half of the inning, they went scoreless with only Jessie Baine getting on base as a result of a walk. The ACT had at least two errors, and the score was 6-0.

The ACT left Parnaby in for the start of the third, where the first Japanese batter Yumi Iwabuchi hit a single to left field, Mari Souma getting struck out and Yamada hitting a double to outfield. At this point, the ACT made a pitching change, bringing in national team pitcher Aimee Murch where there was at least one fielding error by Clare Warwick and additional hits by the Japanese that allowed them to score another two runs before the third out was recorded on a fly ball by Fujino. The ACT’s three batters in their half of the inning, including Ashleigh Eldridge and De Blaes, hit balls caught by Japanese fielders. The inning ended 8-0 Japan.

At the top of the fourth, ACT made three fielding changes and left Murch in as the pitcher. The Japanese went through seven batters and scored two runs before their half of the inning ended. The ACT did better in their half of the inning with hits by Currie and Kathe Tye after the first out was recorded, before Caitlyn Bunker was walked to load the bases. Nikki Pallister then hit a fly ball caught by Japan and turned into a double play to end the inning with a score of 10-0 Japan.

The game officially ended at this point but because this was a training match, it was continued to allow players extra time to train and gain more experience. Japan would go on to score at least one more time in the sixth before the game ended after seven.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 19, 2012

Adam Folkard and Nick Norton ready for more men\’s softball

Adam Folkard and Nick Norton ready for more men’s softball

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, March 19, 2012 Hawker, Canberra — Coming off a national championship win for the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) men’s open team in mid-February, Australia men’s national softball team representatives Nick Norton and Adam Folkard are getting ready for more softball later this year, including the Australian club championships to be held in Brisbane in June.

A man

Nick Norton at the ACT versus Japan women’s game
Image: Laura Hale.

A man and his dog

Adam Folkard at the ACT versus Japan women’s game
Image: Laura Hale.

Folkard and Norton have both won the World Championships and have each won a total of ten national championships with the ACT side. They are both named to the current men’s national team, which has roughly thirty players, and believe they are likely to survive the December cut down to eighteen players who will represent Australia at next year’s World Championship in Auckland, New Zealand.

The World Championship is one of the two most prestigious available to male softball players. The other is the International Softball Congress, an event Folkard and Norton have both competed at.

As national team representatives, there are a lot of expectations for them. In Australia, there is almost no financial support for the men’s game so they must cover most of their own costs, including travel to and from international competitions. According to Folkard’s father, these costs can be prohibitive. In one year, when Folkard was a representative on the men’s U18, U23 and Open team, it cost A$15,000 for travel and other expenses just for Folkard. When costs for bringing family members such as Folkard’s sisters to major international tournaments, the costs were even higher. Folkard, his father and Norton all joked this cost his father an investment property to allow Folkard to continue to compete at the highest level. Both Folkard and Norton currently work as tradesmen to support softball playing.

Beyond money, the national team requires players to be actively involved in wider softball community. Players must represent a club at the club championships in Brisbane if they want to retain a spot in the squad. Folkard plays for a Western Australian club and Norton plays for a Sydney based club, driving down from Canberra to play every Sunday during the season.

Folkard and Norton have both played softball at the highest level in the United States, where the men’s game is not yet fully professionalized but still presents more opportunities for players than are available at home. For several years, Folkard has gone to the United States for three-month stints, playing for teams in Chicago, Pennsylvania, and New York. One side he played was sponsored by Ernst and Young. Folkard currently plays for a Canadian side and has been trying to convince Norton, whom he has grown up playing softball with, to join him like Norton has done one previous season. According to Folkard, playing with a North American club has certain advantages. The clubs pay for his travel to and from Australia, and pay for Championship rings. When asked how North American clubs sign Australian players, he said they follow men’s softball in Australia and call up players to offer contracts. Australian men’s players gain additional exposure to potential clubs when they compete, with some sides approaching them during the North American season and seeking to contract them for the following season.

Both men would love the opportunity to play softball in the Olympics, but believe such an opportunity is unlikely. According to them, softball at the Olympics is a women’s game intrinsically linked to men’s baseball, and men’s softball is unlikely to ever be considered on the programme as a result.

Folkard and Norton both play for the same club in the ACT territory club competition. Their team has secured a grand final berth for the match in ten days. They are waiting to find out who they will play against based on a match this weekend. Both have previously won this competition.



Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Japanese national team beats ACT softball team

Japanese national team beats ACT softball team

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, March 19, 2012

Hawker, Australian Capital Territory — Tonight, the Japanese national team beat the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) softball team 1–0 in the first of a two game series before Japan plays a three game test series against the Australian national team.

The Japanese side lined up during player introductions
Image: LauraHale.

The game was a low scoring pitching duel. Japan brought five pitchers to Canberra for their Australian tour. Since the last Olympics, Japan has been in a rebuilding period. The side is young and many of their best players have not had much international experience. One of their best pitchers is only nineteen years old.

The ACT side included Australian national team members Aimee Murch and Clare Warwick; Olympic bronze medalist Brenda De Blaes; Victorian state team representative, national team member and Olympic bronze medalist Justine Smethurst; and Clare Currie, who narrowly missed the cut for the national team.

An ACT player takes a swing at a pitch
Image: LauraHale.

De Blaes started the top of the first with a hit. She ended the inning stranded on base. Murch was pitching for the ACT to start the bottom of the first. Number 15 for Japan opened the inning with a single, and was advanced to third on another single. She was tagged out after trying to score a run after her teammate hit a pop up caught by the ACT’s centre fielder. Number 6 hit a double during this inning, scoring Japan’s only run.

The top of the second saw ACT players 1, 5 and 3 tagged out after hits to the infield. The bottom of the second saw number 13 out on a foul ball caught on the fly by the ACT’s third baseman, and number 11 and 24 out on balls hit into and caught by the ACT’s centre fielder.

An ACT player on second base
Image: LauraHale.

The top of third inning saw numbers 24 and 21 ground out. De Blaes ended the inning by striking out. The bottom of the third saw Japan’s first batter ground out, number 8 getting a single on an infield hit, another playing getting an out, and the inning ending with number 11 hitting an infield ground out.

The rest of the game followed much the same pattern. Two players, an ACT player and a Japanese, were struck by balls and required trainers to look at them. Smethurst came in and pitched a few innings in relief. Between the fifth and sixth innings, there was a small delay in the game when a dog named Streaker, owned by Australia men’s national softball team player Adam Folkard, ran onto the the infield.

The game ended 1–0. An announcement was made at the end of the game that the match scheduled for tomorrow would start fifteen minutes earlier than the advertised start time of 18:00.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 26, 2008

Squash lines up for the 2016 Olympics

Squash lines up for the 2016 Olympics – Wikinews, the free news source

Squash lines up for the 2016 Olympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, May 26, 2008

A squash match at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Image: Steve McFarland.

Squash is among the seven sports considered for new events in the 2016 Olympics. The other nominated sports are baseball, golf, karate, roller sports, rugby and softball. Of these, four were nominated for the London 2012 Olympics, but none were chosen.

At the International Olympic Committee (IOC) session in Singapore 2005, squash won the vote to get into the Olympic program, but did not get the 2/3 majority needed for adoption. The new sports for 2016 are baseball and softball, with baseball having been in the Olympics before as a “test” sport, however it did not succeed and was only on the program for one event before it was removed.

Squash is among the favourites because it already in 2005 proved to be favourite for the IOC members at that time. Since 2005, according to the World Squash Federation (WSF), there has been a lot of work to get squash into the Olympic Games. A marked rise in players across the world has occurred, and approximately 13 new countries have been adopted into the WSF.

However, baseball is also considered among the favourites, because it has been tried before and because it is a major sport in the United States and growing in the rest of the world. Notably, Chicago is bidding to host the 2016 Olympics, and therefore a major US sport could be the natural choice.

The last of the three favourites is golf, because it is by far the most played sport of the candidates. However, it is seen as a disadvantage that the Olympic tournament may not be the top priority for the players, who may feel they would rather concentrate on the US or European tours.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 8, 2005

Baseball, softball dropped from 2012 Olympics

Baseball, softball dropped from 2012 Olympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, July 8, 2005

The International Olympic Committee has announced today that baseball and softball are to be cut from Olympic competition from 2012. Rugby, karate, rollersports, golf, and squash have been rumored to be included. The IOC meets later today to discuss the new Olympic Program.

The vote, held in Singapore, surprised some supporters of the sports, who believed that there were enough votes to retain them.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress