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September 15, 2014

Libya accuse Qatar of intervening on side of rebels

Libya accuse Qatar of intervening on side of rebels

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Monday, September 15, 2014

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  • 16 February 2015: Islamic State execute 21 Coptic Christians held in Libya
  • 15 September 2014: Libya accuse Qatar of intervening on side of rebels
  • 7 September 2014: Libya accuse Sudan of arming ‘terrorist group’
  • 28 August 2014: US says Egypt and UAE responsible for air attacks on Tripoli
  • 24 August 2014: Renegade General’s forces claim responsibility for aerial attacks on Tripoli
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Libyan Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni yesterday accused Qatar of interfering in his country’s affairs by sending three military planes loaded with weapons to an airport in Tripoli under the control of Islamist rebels.

Abdullah al-Thinni
Image: White House.

The Libyan leader told the United Arab Emirates (UAE)-based Arab TV channel Sky News his country would consider “breaking off relations if this interference into Libya’s internal affairs continued.” He also reiterated previous accusations against Sudan of also trying to supply the rebels.

Last month the US said Egypt and the UAE were involved in airstrikes against militants as they were in the process of capturing Tripoli.

Qatar has previously backed the Muslim Brotherhood, a group reported to have ties with the militants in Tripoli. Other countries, including Egypt and UAE, are reportedly worried about the spread of radical Islam.

Three years after the removal from power of Muammar Gaddafi, Libya now has two competing governments, one in Tripoli, and one in Tobruk where the most recently elected parliament has moved to escape the violence. Rival militias fight each other, and a renegade general is reportedly confronting the Libyan army.


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  • “Libya accuse Sudan of arming ‘terrorist group'” — Wikinews, September 7, 2014
  • “US says Egypt and UAE responsible for air attacks on Tripoli” — Wikinews, August 28, 2014

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September 7, 2014

Libya accuse Sudan of arming \’terrorist group\’

Libya accuse Sudan of arming ‘terrorist group’

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Sunday, September 7, 2014

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Libya asked the Sudanese military attache to leave following accusations yesterday that Sudan was arming an Islamist “terrorist group” in control of Libya’s capital, Tripoli.

Libya’s government, currently located in the eastern city of Tobruk, say a Sudanese transport plane entered Libyan airspace on Thursday bound for Tripoli’s Matiga airport, before making a refueling stop at the southern town of Kufra. During an inspection at Kufra, ammunition was found which Libya accused Sudan of intending to supply to the rebels.

Sudan have denied the accusation, claiming the ammunition was intended for a joint border force of the two countries targeting smuggling and human trafficking. Libya have said they had not given permission for the plane to enter the country’s airspace.

An international arms embargo, first imposed during the 2011 Libyan uprising, is still in effect. A statement from the Libyan government made reference to this, saying the incident “represents a clear violation of international resolutions”.

Algeria and Tunisia are both reinforcing their borders with Libya, following an arms-smuggling incident. The US has previously accused Egypt and the United Arab Emirates of launching aerial attacks on Tripoli.



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  • “US says Egypt and UAE responsible for air attacks on Tripoli” — Wikinews, August 28, 2014

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December 22, 2013

Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions

Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions

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Sunday, December 22, 2013

South Sudan
Other stories from South Sudan
  • 22 December 2013: Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions
  • 26 January 2012: ‘Davos man’ versus ‘Camp Igloo’; 42nd World Economic Forum convenes in Swiss alps
  • 10 July 2011: South Sudan gains independence
  • 10 February 2011: South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed
  • 26 April 2010: Spokesman: At least 55 dead after violence in Darfur, Sudan
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Rebel troops under the command of Riek Machar, former vice president of South Sudan, today stated they now control a number of areas of the country including the oil-rich Unity State which borders Sudan. Government troops are attempting to take back Bor, the capital of the state of Jonglei.

Location of Unity State within South Sudan.
Image: Ivan25.

In Juba, reportedly at least 500 people were killed in the last week. The US military said three US military aircraft — CV-22 Ospreys — were attacked by the rebel troops around Bor, and four US soldiers were injured and taken to Nairobi, Kenya for treatment. At a United Nations facility in Akobo, an attack killed two Indian peacekeepers and at least eleven civilians on Thursday.

Since South Sudan’s 2011 independence from Sudan, ethnic conflicts have caused hundreds of deaths.

World leaders have reacted to the violence. UN General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon said: “I demand that all political, military and militia leaders stop hostilities and end the violence against the civilians. I call on them to do everything in their power to ensure that their followers hear their message loud and clear.”

US President Barack Obama said “any effort to seize power through the use of military force will result in the end of longstanding support from the United States and the international community”.



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August 29, 2011

Sudanese President releases all detained journalists

Sudanese President releases all detained journalists

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Monday, August 29, 2011

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File photo of President Omar al-Bashir.
Image: Prince jasim ali.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir announced the release of all journalists detained in the country’s jails in an address to a gathering of journalists in the capital of Khartoum, on Saturday. “I declare amnesty for all the journalists detained by the security authorities and their release,” said Al-Bashir.

This came in the same month as the release of Abu Zar Al-Amin, deputy editor-in-chief of pro-opposition paper Ra’y Al-Sha’b. Al-Almin had served a prison term of nearly two years after he violating press restrictions and reporting on alleged co-operation between Sudan and the Iranian Revolutionary Guard.

The release and amnesty follows a series of fresh violations of ‘press freedoms’, which resulted in the suspension of independent newspapers such as Al-Jaridah and Al-Ahdath on August 20 and 21. According to Mozdalifa Mohamed Osman, Al-Ahdath’s newsroom chief, the suspension caused financial losses of US$10,000.

No reasons were given for the suspension of the newspapers. However, the editor-in-chief of AlJaridah, Saad Al-Din Ibrahim revealed that his paper was suspended because it did not allow the security services to interfere in its editorial and recruitment policies; sources believe the Al-Ahdath suspension was due to the publication of information on a planned meeting between President Al-Bashir and the leader of armed opposition group Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (northern sector) Malik Aggar.

According to press-freedom watchdog the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), the Sudanese government aggressively attacks journalists through “contrived legal proceedings, politicized criminal charges, and confiscations”. Amnesty International believes Sudanese press freedom is “openly violated”.

Press freedoms may deteriorate with the National Congress Party contemplating further restrictions, including the possibility of pre-publication censorship.



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July 10, 2011

South Sudan gains independence

South Sudan gains independence – Wikinews, the free news source

South Sudan gains independence

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South Sudan
Other stories from South Sudan
  • 22 December 2013: Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions
  • 26 January 2012: ‘Davos man’ versus ‘Camp Igloo’; 42nd World Economic Forum convenes in Swiss alps
  • 10 July 2011: South Sudan gains independence
  • 10 February 2011: South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed
  • 26 April 2010: Spokesman: At least 55 dead after violence in Darfur, Sudan
…More articles here
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Sunday, July 10, 2011

At 0000 EAT Saturday (2100 UTC Friday), the Republic of South Sudan achieved independent recognition, becoming the newest country on the planet. The parliament speaker for the new country recited a formal independence declaration. After independence was declared, the South Sudanese flag was lifted for all to see, with Sudan People’s Liberation Army/Movement secretary general Pagan Amum stating: “Today we shall raise the flag of South Sudan to join the nations of the world”.

Cquote1.svg Today we shall raise the flag of South Sudan to join the nations of the world Cquote2.svg

Pagan Amum, Sudan People’s Liberation Army/Movement secretary general

Thousands of jubilant people celebrated in the new country’s capital Juba. They danced in the streets, sang songs and waved flags. Churches rang their bells at midnight as independence arrived. People crowded to the official ceremonial site, held at the mausoleum of John Garang, leader of the rebellion who died several months after the peace deal was signed with Sudan, ending the bloody conflict. Many of the celebrants spoke emotionally of their family members who died in the long struggle with Sudan.

George Garang, an English teacher, said he lost his father, grandfather and eleven brothers. “My whole body feels happy,” he said. Valentino Achak Deng, who was a refugee during the war, said: “Really in my heart what makes me happiest is that from today, when people ask me where I am from, I do not have to say Sudan.”

Salva Kiir Mayardit has assumed the role as president of South Sudan. Kiir swore to pledge true alliance and faithfulness to South Sudan. In a speech, Kiir declared amnesty for any who have taken up arms against Sudan.

Kiir insisted that martyrs for the cause of the new country did not die in vain, although South Sudan waited 56 years to be free. The southern Sudanese had agitated for more rights, even before Sudan became free from its British colonizers in 1956. Sudan was divided into three separate demographic groups, with the southern part of the country home to Christians and animists and the northern part dominated by Arab populations and those of Muslim faith. Kiir said to people of Abyei, Darfur, Blue Nile and South Kordofan, who remain part of Sudan, that “we have not forgotten you. When you cry, we cry. When you bleed, we bleed. I pledge to you today that we will find a just peace for all.”

Amongst those attending the event were Ban Ki-moon, the current Secretary-General of the United Nations and Omar al-Bashir, the current president of Sudan. The latter was the guest of honour, despite the fact that the International Criminal Court has a warrant out for his arrest based on offences of genocide and crimes against humanity in the Darfur region.

“We congratulate our brothers in the south for the establishment of their new state,” al-Bashir said at the event. “We share their joy and celebration. The will of the people of the south has to be respected.”

Two million individuals died in the civil war between the two territories of Sudan and Southern Sudan and four million more exiled, a war that was waged for decades. Control of south Sudan’s oil rich reserves was the primary reason for the fighting. An agreement of peace was signed in 2005, effectively bringing the war to an end, and Sudan became one of the first countries to recognise South Sudan. Under the regulations of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, Sudan held an independence referendum. In excess of 99% of those participating in the vote agreed to the concept of independence for South Sudan.

Meanwhile, the United Nations plans to make the independent state its 193rd recognised country and its 54th African U.N. member state. United States president Barack Obama formerly recognized the new nation on behalf of the US and acknowledged the enormous struggle of its people to achieve independence.

South Sudan remains a desperately poor country, with one in five of its inhabitants chronically hungry, only one third having access to safe drinking water and with the world’s highest rate of maternal death. The country lacks infrastructure such as roads and railways. It remains torn by ethnic and tribal rivalries and many problems with the north remain unresolved, including the exact boundary line. Important revenue for Sudan has come from the rich oilfields of the south, keeping the country afloat and essential now for both economies. A formula remains to be developed on how to split these revenues between the two areas.

U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice said today that the peace process between Sudan and North Sudan could come apart if issues such as the division of the oil revenues and the border location are not solved soon.

Flag of South Sudan. Image: Public domain.

Flag of South Sudan.
Image: Public domain.

The location of South Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map. Image: Spesh531.

The location of South Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map.
Image: Spesh531.

File photo of Salva Kiir Mayardit, the president of South Sudan. Image: Jenny Rockett.

File photo of Salva Kiir Mayardit, the president of South Sudan.
Image: Jenny Rockett.

Flag of Sudan. Image: Public domain.

Flag of Sudan.
Image: Public domain.

The location of Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map. Image: Dinamik.

The location of Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map.
Image: Dinamik.

Sudan president Omar al-Bashir, seen here in January 2009, attended the independence ceremony. Image: U.S. Navy / Jesse B. Awalt.

Sudan president Omar al-Bashir, seen here in January 2009, attended the independence ceremony.
Image: U.S. Navy / Jesse B. Awalt.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, seen here in September 2010, was amongst those present in South Sudan upon the state's declaration of independence. Image: Gobierno de Chile.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, seen here in September 2010, was amongst those present in South Sudan upon the state’s declaration of independence.
Image: Gobierno de Chile.



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February 10, 2011

South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed

Filed under: Africa,Archived,Crime and law,Juba,South Sudan,Sudan — admin @ 5:00 am

South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed – Wikinews, the free news source

South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed

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Thursday, February 10, 2011

South Sudan’s Cooperatives and Rural Development Minister, Jimmy Lemi Milla, was shot and killed yesterday at his office in Juba, South Sudan. Officials said they believed the shooting was not politically motivated.

Cquote1.svg This is such a shock to the people here, coming so soon after our peaceful referendum. Cquote2.svg

—Richard Lukodu

According to witnesses, after the minister and his bodyguard had entered the ministry building, the shooter broke into the minister’s car and took from it the bodyguard’s pistol, entered the building, and shot and killed first the minister, then the bodyguard. He was subdued and taken into custody. According to officials, the shooter, who may have been the minister’s brother-in-law, had been employed by Milla and wanted to be paid.

Civil servant Richard Lukodu said, “This is such a shock to the people here, coming so soon after our peaceful referendum… This is the result of one angry man — and people should not think that this is reflective of all of south Sudan.”

South Sudan held a referendum last month on secession from Sudan. Following decades of civil war officially ending in 2005, violence in the south has been a continuing problem, but lessened leading up to the referendum. The result of the referendum was overwhelmingly for secession, and the President of Sudan has stated acceptance of that result.



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July 17, 2010

Sudanese Army claims to have killed 300 Darfur rebels in clashes

Sudanese Army claims to have killed 300 Darfur rebels in clashes

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Saturday, July 17, 2010

The Darfur region of Sudan is a war torn region. According to the UN, 300,000 people have been killed and 2.7 million people displaced.

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The Sudanese Army said it killed over 300 rebels in the Darfur region of the country, and lost 75 of its own in clashes during the past week. General Al-Tayeb al-Musbah Osman was quoted by the Sudanese media as saying the fighting was with the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM). He also said that the government’s forces had destroyed rebel vehicles in the fighting, as well as capturing 86 people.

The Justice and Equality Movement denied the government’s statements, saying that they had defeated the army, not the other way around. UNAMID said there had been fighting in the area, but it would not say the number of the casualties. This incident is the second of its kind in recent months; in May, several hundred rebel fighters were killed by the government.

The Justice and Equality Movement is one of two rebel movements that have boycotted peace talks with the government; the other one is the Sudan Liberation Army.

The Darfur Region has been subject to violence for the past seven years, when the rebels began to fight the government, saying that the the western part of the country was being neglected. The UN has said that over 300,000 people have been killed, and 2.7 million people have been forced to relocate, while the Sudanese government claims only 10,000 people have died. The Sudanese President, Omar al-Bashiri has been charged with genocide due to his handling of the situation in Darfur.



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May 27, 2010

Sudanese president sworn in to another term

Sudanese president sworn in to another term

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Thursday, May 27, 2010

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File photo of Omar al-Bashir
Image: Jesse B. Awalt.

Omar al-Bashir, the president of Sudan, has been sworn in to another term after winning the country’s recent polls, which were largely boycotted by the opposition.

The inauguration ceremony, attended by multiple African leaders and two diplomats from the United Nations, was held earlier today. A reporter for the Al Jazeera news agency described the event as being primarily “a gathering of African leaders”.

In his inauguration speech, al-Bashir said that there would be “no return to war” with southern Sudan, and said a referendum on southern independence would be held on time. Southern Sudan is to hold a ballot in January of next year on whether to secede from the rest of the country. The referendum is a key part of the 2005 peace deal that ended Sudan’s north-south civil war.

al-Bashir was re-elected in April with 68% of the vote. Many opposition parties boycotted the election, accusing the president’s party of having rigged the result.

The president is wanted by the International Criminal Court on charges of war crimes, including allegations that he ordered mass murder, rape and torture in Darfur, where rebels have frequently clashed with the government; al-Bashir strongly denies the claims.



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May 8, 2010

Two Egyptian peacekeepers killed in Darfur by gunmen

Two Egyptian peacekeepers killed in Darfur by gunmen

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Saturday, May 8, 2010

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Two peacekeepers from Egypt, working for the joint United Nations-African Union mission in Darfur, were killed in an ambush yesterday by gunmen, reports say.

Three others were hurt when the incident happened near Edd al-Fursan in South Darfur. Kemal Saiki, a spokesman with the mission, commented on the incident in a statement: “Today, at about 11:30 am [14.30 UTC], a military convoy from UNAMID’s Egyptian contingent, with three vehicles and 20 personnel, was ambushed near Katila village, 85 kilometres [53 miles] south of Edd al-Fursan, South Darfur, by a group of unidentified armed men who indiscriminately opened fire, without warning, on the peacekeepers.

“The attackers fled when the convoy returned fire. The attack left two peacekeepers killed in action and three seriously wounded,” Saiki added. He condemned the clash as being a “criminal act”.

Nobody has, as of yet, claimed responsibility for the attack. Darfur and the surrounding region are prone to violence, caused by a civil war; with these deaths, 24 peacekeepers have been killed since UNAMID was deployed to the area two years ago.



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April 26, 2010

Spokesman: At least 55 dead after violence in Darfur, Sudan

Spokesman: At least 55 dead after violence in Darfur, Sudan

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Monday, April 26, 2010

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According to Mohammed Issa Aliou, a spokesman for the Rezeigat tribe in Darfur, Sudan, at least 55 people have been killed in the city after clashes with the Southern Sudanese army.

Issa Aliou said yesterday that Rezeigat tribal members were attacked by armed forces near the border with the partially autonomous South Sudan on Friday, as they were looking for water and new pastures.

The South Sudanese army, however, responded by saying that the tribal members were the ones who had started the attacks.

“A company of 120 SPLA [Sudan People’s Liberation Army] soldiers was attacked on Friday night by armed men wearing uniforms of the northern army that were heavily equipped,” said Major General Kuol Deim Kuol, with the southern former rebel SPLA.



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