Wiki Actu en

October 10, 2013

UK government rejects industry proposal for press regulation

UK government rejects industry proposal for press regulation

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, October 10, 2013

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Maria Miller announced the rejection of the newspaper industry’s proposals in Parliament Tuesday.
Image: Work and Pensions Office.

The British government have rejected a proposed plan for press self-regulation from a group of newspaper publishers and have said they intend to proceed with a Royal Charter supported by the three main political parties. The culture secretary Maria Miller said Tuesday in the House of Commons the proposal by the newspaper industry failed to implement fundamental parts of the recommendations of the Leveson Inquiry into behaviour and ethical standards of the press last year.

Miller announced the final draft of the Charter will become availble on Friday following revisions by the political parties, and will be discussed by the Privy Council on October 30. The proposals offered by the newspapers and the government differ on implementation details on the regulator that would replace the Press Complaints Commission. The newspapers wish to allow former editors of newspapers to serve on the “recognition panel” which would supervise the operation of the regulator while the government wishes to forbid former editors. The government wish to prevent serving newspaper editors from being on the appointments committee for the regulator while the press proposal seeks to require one of the four members of the committee to represent the press industry.

The government proposal seeks to make it so the Royal Charter can be amended by Parliament, with a two-thirds majority from both houses, while the press proposal gives industry trade bodies a say on changes to the Charter. In both proposals, an arbitration service would be provided as an alternative to going to court, but the government wishes to make the arbitration service free for claimants while the newspapers want it to be “inexpensive” because they believe free arbitration could lead to a rush in claims going to arbitration. Both proposals would allow the regulator to fine the industry up to £1 million and demand the prominent publication of corrections and apologies to news stories.

The Hacked Off campaign welcomed the rejection of the industry proposals. A spokesman described the proposals as “a wrecking manouevre by unrepentant sections of the press trying to avoid accountability and carry on with a broken system of press regulation” but condemned the delays in implementation: “Ten months after the publication of the Leveson Report and seven months after all parties in parliament endorsed its recommendations in a Royal Charter, there can be no legitimate excuse for yet another delay.”

Hacked Off was formed following the revelations in 2011 that journalists working for the Sunday tabloid News of the World hacked into the voicemail of murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler.

The newspaper industry continue to express concern regarding the proposals. Trevor Kavanagh, a columnist for the Sun, said that the “major issue here is keeping the freedom of the press out of the sticky fingers of the politicians who want to control it”.

Kirsty Hughes from Index on Censorship said: “Establishing press regulation by royal charter could allow politicians to interfere in press regulation and threaten media freedom in the UK.”

Movie actor Hugh Grant, a director of Hacked Off, rejected criticism of the charter from the press, arguing the press object to the system because “when the press gets things wrong and harms people unfairly, the charter system will give those people a much better chance of redress. It will provide free or at least very cheap arbitration, instead of requiring people whose rights have been breached to pay mountainous high court legal bills. And it will provide a free, independent complaints service in the case of breaches of the industry code of standards.”

Grant goes on to argue that the press have attempted to reform the “old, discredited” Press Complaints Commission which Lord Leveson had found not fit for purpose. Instead, he argues, the press should welcome the new regulator as a protection from libel as joining in means “their journalists will have better protection from legal bullying by corporations and oligarchs. Because litigants are pushed towards cheap arbitration it will no longer be possible for the very wealthy to gag reporters simply by threatening high court actions. The court costs would fall to the libel bully.”



Related news

  • “Leveson Inquiry told hacking was ‘bog-standard’ journalism tool at Daily Mirror” — Wikinews, December 21, 2011

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 17, 2012

News of the World Scotland editor charged with perjury, hacking

News of the World Scotland editor charged with perjury, hacking

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, August 17, 2012

Crime and law
Related articles
  • 29 June 2015: Dozens dead in Mumbai after consuming toxic alcohol
  • 11 June 2015: 16-year-old girl charged with attempted murder in Melbourne, Australia
  • 30 May 2015: Non-parole period extended to 43 years for Australian rapist and murderer
  • 28 May 2015: Western Australia police close in on murder suspect, arrest warrant issued
  • 21 May 2015: Yingluck Shinawatra, former Thai prime minster, begins her trial in Bangkok over corruption allegations

Crime and law
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The former news editor at the now-defunct News of the World‘s Scottish division has been charged with perjury, conspiring to hack telephones, and breaching data protection legislation.

Scottish politician Tommy Sheridan features prominently in the inquiry, with Wight the second man to be accused of lying at his trial.

Strathclyde Police made the announcement yesterday that Douglas Wight, 39, has been arrested and charged as part of the force’s probe into phone-hacking in Scotland, dubbed Operation Rubicon. The investigation encompasses possible perjury at the trial of Tommy Sheridan, a former Member of the Scottish Parliament who was himself tried for perjury in late 2010. Sheridan was convicted of lying during an earlier defamation case against the News of the World.

Wight is now accused of lying at that trial, as well as a plot to hack phones in Scotland, and a number of allegations relating to unlawful acquisition of private data. Wight, who lives in London, attended a Glaswegian police station yesterday at the police’s request. He left last night and is not due in court today; a report is being prepared for the local procurator fiscal (prosecutor).

The charges follow Andy Coulson, who served as communications chief to David Cameron, being charged in May with perjury at the same trial. Sheridan was ultimately jailed for three years and released after serving one; he continues to protest his innocence. It followed a successful defamation case before the Court of Session in 2006, at which Sheridan was awarded £200,000 over allegations in the paper of sexual infidelity; his wife Gail was also tried in 2010 but cleared of lying in the case.



Related news

  • “Scottish politician going to jail after perjury conviction” — Wikinews, December 24, 2010

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 28, 2012

Five arrested over police payments at News International

Five arrested over police payments at News International

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, January 28, 2012

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Four journalists from The Sun newspaper and one police officer have been arrested today as part of Operation Elveden, the investigation into payments by journalists working at News International to police officers.

The police officer has been identified as a 29-year-old officer in the Territorial Policing Command at the Metropolitan Police. The police have not identified the journalists, but the BBC suggest they are Fergus Shanahan, ex-deputy editor of The Sun; Graham Dudman, ex-managing editor; Mike Sullivan, crime editor; and Chris Pharo, head of news.

The Metropolitan Police have said News Corporation disclosed information leading to the arrests. The offices of News International at Wapping have also been searched today as part of the investigation. Operation Elveden has now arrested a total of fourteen people: 12 journalists and two police officers.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 22, 2011

News International offers £3 million phone-hacking settlement to family of murder victim

News International offers £3 million phone-hacking settlement to family of murder victim

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Rupert Murdoch.
Image: Rupert Murdoch – World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2007.

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The family of murdered UK thirteen-year-old Milly Dowler, whose phone was hacked by journalists of the News of the World, have been offered £3 million compensation by Rupert Murdoch’s News International, in settlement negotiations currently under way.

UK newspaper The Guardian revealed the phone hacking earlier this year. After Dowler was reported missing in 2002, her voicemail messages were listened to and several deleted, creating the impression she might still be alive.

The £3 million on offer reportedly includes £1 million to charity. The rest would go directly to the family. The Guardian reports the Dowler’s lawyers were believed to be looking for about ₤3.5 million.

News International stated they were “in advanced negotiations” and “hope to conclude the discussion as quickly as possible.”

Rupert Murdoch personally met with the Dowler family earlier in the year to offer them his apologies for the actions of his News of the World paper. News of the World ceased publishing after discovery of the Dowler hacking and other similar incidents.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 25, 2011

UK electoral commission asked to investigate News International payoffs

UK electoral commission asked to investigate News International payoffs

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, August 25, 2011

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Labour MP Tom Watson is calling for an investigation into payments by News International to Andy Coulson.
Image: Jwyg.

The United Kingdom electoral commission has been asked to investigate whether payments made by News International to Andy Coulson amidst the recent phone hacking scandal were illegal.

Labor MP Tom Watson, who has been a driving force in the phone hacking scandal, called for the investigation after he believed that payments and benefits made to Coulson, including private health benefits and a company car, should have been declared as a political donation. Mr Watson has reportedly been trying to uncover whether Coulson declared these payments to the cultures committee upon applying for access to parliament.

MPs are bewildered by Prime Minister David Cameron’s hiring of Coulson without anyone looking into his financial history, and many have expressed outrage as the reports contradict evidence given by the former News of The World editor to the culture committee in 2009. He allegedly told the committee that he had received a salary of £275,000 and that he did not have a second income.

Coulson is expected to face further questioning from the committee about the payments after he is cleared from the phone hacking scandal.

Robert Peston, a journalist for the BBC, claimed that Mr Coulson had received several hundred thousand pounds from News International after he began working for the Conservative Party. Despite his ousting in 2007, Mr Coulson received his severance pay in installments from News International until the end of that year.

Coulson was known to have received a payoff after his resignation from News of the World in 2007. The resignation came after the conviction of journalist Clive Goodman for phone hacking.

The Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee has stated that both Coulson and News International should have informed the committee about the payments. The investigation will decide whether or not the electoral committee has been misled by Coulson, and whether the payments should be considered as a political donation.

The committee is expected to meet in early September to decide on a plan of action.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 31, 2011

British police launch computer hacking investigation

British police launch computer hacking investigation

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, July 31, 2011

United Kingdom
Related articles
  • 26 June 2015: Former Scottish Conservatives leader Annabel Goldie to stand down as MSP
  • 25 June 2015: Petition pressures City of Edinburgh Council to review clause affecting live music scene
  • 13 June 2015: English actor Christopher Lee dies aged 93
  • 6 June 2015: Major haemorrhage linked to alcoholism announced as cause of Charles Kennedy’s death
  • 4 June 2015: Charles Kennedy, former Liberal Democrats leader, dies aged 55
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The Metropolitan Police, a British police force based in the capital city of London, has announced its intention to commence a new investigation related to allegations of computer hacking. The force has received numerous allegations of computer and email hacking relating to journalists since January of this year, prompting the launch of the probe, codenamed Operation Tuleta. According to a spokesperson for Scotland Yard, computer hacking allegations have already been brought into account, but now, “some aspects of that operation are being moved towards investigation”.

These allegations occurred during Operation Weeting, which has investigated alleged phone hacking offences. The Metropolitan Police said that the computer hacking claims were not within the remit of the phone hacking allegation probe, so a separate investigation had to be launched. Operation Tuleta consists of a fresh team of detectives, who will provide information to Operation Weeting deputy assistant commissioner Sue Akers.

Meanwhile, the legal representatives for Glenn Mulcaire, a private investigator for the former British publication News of the World (NotW) have stated that he was proceeding “on the instructions of others”. Sara Payne, the mother of the murdered girl Sarah Payne, was informed that Mulcaire possibly hacked into her phone and gathered her contact information. Payne was said to be “very distressed and upset” by the allegations. Mulcaire was sentenced to prison in January 2007 along with Clive Goodman, the royal editor for the NotW.

The final edition of the NotW was published this July, amid the phone hacking scandal within News Corporation. A public inquiry relating to the affair was launched, triggered by allegations of phone hacking and police corruption.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 19, 2011

Arrests and resignations as probe into Britain\’s phone hacking scandal widens

Arrests and resignations as probe into Britain’s phone hacking scandal widens

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

United Kingdom
Related articles
  • 26 June 2015: Former Scottish Conservatives leader Annabel Goldie to stand down as MSP
  • 25 June 2015: Petition pressures City of Edinburgh Council to review clause affecting live music scene
  • 13 June 2015: English actor Christopher Lee dies aged 93
  • 6 June 2015: Major haemorrhage linked to alcoholism announced as cause of Charles Kennedy’s death
  • 4 June 2015: Charles Kennedy, former Liberal Democrats leader, dies aged 55
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Metropolitan Police Service Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson who resigned Sunday.
Image: Southbanksteve.

Further arrests and resignations have occurred related to the News International phone hacking scandal. Rebekah Brooks, former executive with Rupert Murdoch‘s British newspaper division of News Corporation, was arrested Sunday and released on bail 12 hours later. Her arrest came amid allegations that the News of the World illegally hacked into 4,000 individual cell phones. Brooks resigned from her position on Friday. Hers was the tenth arrest connected to the scandal.

The scandal has now caused two high profile resignations at the Metropolitan Police (Scotland Yard).

On Sunday Sir Paul Stephenson, commissioner of Metropolitan Police Service, resigned from his post, taking responsibility for the agency’s failure to investigate all alleged criminal acts by reporters of News of the World and for the implied close relationship between the police and Murdoch’s papers. The investigation of the complaints of phone hacking made by the Royal Family in 2006 was never fully pursued. He was also criticized for hiring former deputy editor of the NotW Neil Wallis as a media consultant. Wallis was arrested last week for his part in the scandal.

Assistant commissioner John Yates‘ resignation followed Stephenson’s, after it emerged he had inappropriately fostered the hiring of the daughter of his friend Wallis, and failed to pursue an investigation of the NotW in 2009. Yates labelled this action “a pretty crap one”.

Last night, it was reported that Sean Hoare, a whistleblower who worked for former NotW editor Andy Coulson and was the first to allege a high ranking-editor had known about phone hacking at the NotW, was found dead at his home. Police say the death is not categorized as “suspicious” although it is unexplained. The BBC reported that Hoare had suffered from an unspecified illness. He was let go from NotW in 2005 for problems related to substance abuse.

The revelations are the latest in a growing scandal that has so far led to the resignations of a number of News Corporation executives, including Les Hinton, the publisher of the US newspaper The Wall Street Journal, on Friday. The scandal has also led Murdoch to close the NotW and drop his bid to take full control of broadcaster BSkyB. Pressure grew on Murdoch when it was alleged journalists at the NotW had hacked into the phone of missing schoolgirl Milly Dowler, British families of victims of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and relatives of British soldiers killed in Afghanistan.

David Cameron, the British prime minister, is scheduled to return from his trip to Africa two days early in order to deal with the scandal that has shaken the public’s trust in the police, journalists and politicians. Cameron has been under pressure to apologise for his appointment of Coulson—who was arrested two weeks ago—as a media adviser after his resignation as editor of the NotW. Cameron has also been criticized for taking a trip to Africa at this time; a Conservative party member said it seemed as if the prime minister was “fleeing the country”.

Rupert Murdoch and his son James, an executive in the Murdoch news empire, and Rebekah Brooks appeared before parliament on Tuesday to answer questions about their knowledge of the phone hacking issues.



Related news

  • “Rebekah Brooks resigns from News International” — Wikinews, July 16, 2011
  • “Murdoch drops BSkyB bid amid public, political pressure” — Wikinews, July 13, 2011
  • “Murdoch empire in crisis after newspaper closes: BSkyB bid halted, former editor arrested, anger at chief executive” — Wikinews, July 10, 2011
  • “Murdoch axes News of the World after hacking allegations startle politicians” — Wikinews, July 9, 2011
  • Arrests over phone-tap of British royal family” — Wikinews, August 9, 2006

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 16, 2011

Rebekah Brooks resigns from News International

Rebekah Brooks resigns from News International

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, July 16, 2011

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Logo of the News International group

Rebekah Brooks, the chief executive of News International, has resigned after two weeks of growing pressure over allegations of phone hacking at British tabloid newspaper the News of the World.

“I feel a deep sense of responsibility for the people we have hurt and I want to reiterate how sorry I am for what we now know to have taken place,” Brooks, who formerly edited the NotW, said in a statement. Her resignation came amid mounting pressure from politicians for her resignation, and after Rupert Murdoch dropped his bid to take full control of BSkyB following growing public anger.

David Cameron, the British prime minister, said Brooks had made the “right decision” to leave her post. His spokesperson said: “Clearly there have been mistakes made. There are a lot of questions to answer.” Ed Miliband, the leader of the Labour party also welcomed the decision. “No one in this country should exercise power without responsibility,” he said. “[But] this is not just about one individual but about the culture of an organisation.”

Her resignation came as it emerged the FBI had launched an investigation into the alleged hacking of relatives of victims of the September 11 attacks on the United States by journalists at the NotW. The move amounts to the first time the scandal has spread outside of Britain, and analysts predict it might have widespread consequences for Murdoch.

Murdoch, the media giant at the head of News Corporation, the parent company of News International, has so far stood by Brooks. Analysts say the pressure for her resignation came to a head on Thursday night as Alwaleed bin Talal al-Saud, the Saudi prince who owns the second largest stake in News Corporation, questioned her “integrity”. He told the BBC: “For sure she has to go, you bet she has to go.”

His comments followed the arrests of a number of NotW editors and reporters, and the closing of the tabloid in reaction to the phone hacking scandal that has erupted in the last two weeks following allegations that the voicemail of abducted and murdered teenager Milly Dowler was hacked into. It has also emerged that journalists at the NotW had been involved in the hacking of phones belonging to victims of the 7/7 attacks in London and relatives of British soldiers killed in combat in Afghanistan.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Murdoch has defended his handling of the scandal. “The company has made mistakes,” he said. “It is not only receiving appropriate scrutiny, but is also responding to unfair attacks by setting the record straight.” It has also emerged today that News International is to take out large advertisements in British newspapers this weekend to apologise for what they describe as “wrongdoings” at the NotW.

Brooks worked for News International for 22 years and had also edited the daily tabloid paper The Sun. She will be replaced by Tom Mockridge, the chief executive of Sky Italia. Her announcement was made to staff at News International’s offices in Wapping in East London.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 13, 2011

Murdoch drops BSkyB bid amid public, political pressure

Murdoch drops BSkyB bid amid public, political pressure

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Economy and business
Euro coins and banknotes.jpg
Related articles
  • 25 June 2015: Petition pressures City of Edinburgh Council to review clause affecting live music scene
  • 5 June 2015: Australian businessman Alan Bond dies aged 77
  • 5 March 2015: Spanish authorities arrest Yuriy Kolobov, former Ukrainian finance minister
  • 26 February 2015: Southwest Airlines grounds 128 uninspected planes
  • 9 December 2014: New Delhi orders Uber cease operation following alleged rape
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

File photograph of Rupert Murdoch.
Image: David Shankbone.

News Corporation, owned by Rupert Murdoch, has made the decision to abandon a deal to take full control of broadcasting company BSkyB. The decision came amidst pressure from the British public and politicians, as British parliamentarians from the government and opposition parties prepared to vote in the House of Commons in London to urge Murdoch to drop the deal.

The Murdoch move followed a series of damaging revelations about alleged phone hacking offences by journalists at the News of the World, which published its last edition on July 10. Labour leader Ed Miliband said the decision was “a victory for people up and down this country who have been appalled by the revelations of the phone hacking scandal and the failure of News International to take responsibility”.

Chase Carey, the president of News Corporation, said it would be “too difficult to progress in this climate.” The corporation “remains a committed long-term shareholder in BSkyB,” Carey said in a statement. “We are proud of the success it has achieved and our contribution to it.”

Politicians from around the political spectrum have expressed their disapproval on Murdoch over the allegations of phone hacking and praised his decision to drop the deal, with Nick Clegg, the deputy prime minister, saying the decision was “decent and sensible”; while Ivan Lewis, a senior Labour shadow minister, called the decision “a victory for the public of this country.”



Related news

Sources

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
News of the World phone hacking affair


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 10, 2011

Murdoch empire in crisis after newspaper closes: BSkyB bid halted, former editor arrested, anger at chief executive

Murdoch empire in crisis after newspaper closes: BSkyB bid halted, former editor arrested, anger at chief executive

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Economy and business
Euro coins and banknotes.jpg
Related articles
  • 25 June 2015: Petition pressures City of Edinburgh Council to review clause affecting live music scene
  • 5 June 2015: Australian businessman Alan Bond dies aged 77
  • 5 March 2015: Spanish authorities arrest Yuriy Kolobov, former Ukrainian finance minister
  • 26 February 2015: Southwest Airlines grounds 128 uninspected planes
  • 9 December 2014: New Delhi orders Uber cease operation following alleged rape
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Murdoch with his wife, Wendi, in 2011.
Image: David Shankbone.

Rupert Murdoch, the media billionaire giant at the head of News Corporation, flew to London today amid a growing storm over allegations of phone hacking at the News of the World, which this week closed down the bestselling newspaper in the country, saw a former editor of the newspaper arrested, and halted his hopes of taking full control of broadcaster BSkyB.

After a devastating week for Murdoch which saw new allegations that journalists from the tabloid hacked into the phones of a missing schoolgirl and relatives of victims of the 7/7 attacks, his empire was in crisis last night as it emerged the British government had put on hold his bid to take over BSkyB.

Investors rushed to ditch their shares BSkyB as Cameron announced an independent inquiry into hacking at the newspaper and Jeremy Hunt, the culture secretary, said it would be “some time” before a take-over bid was authorised after a massive public response. “Shareholders are discounting the possibility that this bid won’t happen for the foreseeable future. Some people wonder if it will happen at all,” said media analyst.

Cquote1.svg I decided to give him a second chance but the second chance didn’t work. The decision to hire him was mine and mine alone. Cquote2.svg

—David Cameron, speaking about Andy Coulson

Prime minister David Cameron was forced on the defensive Friday after the arrest of Andy Coulson, a former editor of the NotW who later went on to work at Downing Street. Cameron tried to distance himself from the allegations of phone hacking, but refused to apologise for hiring Coulson. “I decided to give him a second chance but the second chance didn’t work. The decision to hire him was mine and mine alone,” Cameron said on Friday.

Coulson was bailed until later this year on Friday evening after he was questioned by officers working with Operation Weeting, which is investigating phone hacking, and his house was searched. As he left a police station in Lewisham, he said that “[t]here is an awful lot I would like to say, but I can’t at this time.”

News Corporation executives are also facing new allegations that they have disrupted inquiries at Scotland Yard into hacking at the NotW by deleting millions of incriminating e-mails. A report in The Guardian newspaper indicated that the “massive quantities” of deleted e-mails revealed discussions between journalists and editors.

Labour politicians have now demanded in a letter to Cameron that he start an inquiry before more evidence is deleted or hidden. Harriet Harman, the deputy Labour leader, said computers may be destroyed and journalists may become difficult to contact once the paper closes. A spokesperson for News International, the British arm of News Corporation, said the allegations of obstructing the police investigation were “rubbish”.

Journalists at the NotW were on Saturday putting together the final publication of the paper at News International headquarters in Wapping. There was fury in the newsroom of the tabloid on Friday as Rebekah Brooks, the chief executive of News International, told reporters the brand had become “toxic” and had to close. Sources at the paper said journalists who are being made redundant as the paper closes feel they are being sacrificed to save Brooks. “They have to make us redundant first and then they will recruit some people again,” a reporter at the tabloid said, speaking on condition of anonymity. “They have to do that to show they’re scrapping the old paper.”



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress