Wiki Actu en

June 19, 2015

Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof arrested

Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof arrested

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, June 19, 2015

United States
Related articles
Location of United States
USA orthographic.svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Dylann Roof, the suspect in a mass shooting in an historic church in Charleston, South Carolina, has been arrested by police after a fourteen-hour manhunt ending in Shelby, North Carolina, approximately 395km from the site of the massacre.

Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, site of the massacre.
Image: Cal Sr.

Witnesses say the gunman entered the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church, a predominately African-American church, and sat with prayer groups for an hour before opening fire on the church-goers. While in police custody Roof admitted the attacks were racially motivated and that he hoped to start a race war. Allegedly, after shooting nine members of the church, six women and three men including the Reverends Clementa Pinckney and Daniel Simmons Sr., Roof left the church and escaped in his car, a black Hyundai, heading north into North Carolina. Roof’s car was spotted by Debbie Dills, a North Carolina woman who followed him for more than 48 km into Shelby while giving police updates over the phone. Soon after Shelby police pulled Roof over and took him into custody.

Police confirmed that Roof had purchased the gun used to commit the murders from a Charleston gun store in April with his grandfather explaining he had received birthday money but the family didn’t know what he did with it. Roof’s uncle has said that received the gun as a 21st birthday present.

Photos and posts on Roof’s social media appear to show him as supportive of white supremacist ideals with several pictures showing Roof wearing the flags of apartheid-era South Africa and Rhodesia. Several of Roof’s friends have admitted that Roof had expressed racists sentiments before and that he had been planning something for the last six months although the police were not contacted.

Roof is expected to face the death penalty if found guilty.



Sources[]

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 23, 2012

South African farm worker gets life for Terre\’Blanche murder

South African farm worker gets life for Terre’Blanche murder

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, August 23, 2012

South Africa
Related articles
Location of South Africa
South Africa (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

A court in South Africa yesterday gave a life sentence to farm worker Chris Mahlungu for the 2010 murder of white supremacist Eugene Terre’Blanche.

A file photo of Terre’Blanche, who was killed two years ago.

Although Mahlungu is black, the court found the crime was not racist. Court and prosecution instead agreed a fight erupted as part of a pay dispute. Terre’Blanche, 69, was co-founder of the Afrikaner Resistance Movement (AWB), which conducted bombings in the run-up to elections that ended apartheid in 1994. He had served prison time for attacking two blacks, one of whom he was convicted of trying to murder.

AWB protestors hung an effigy of Mahlungu from a noose and dragged it behind a truck outside the court, while the AWB marching band struck up Afrikaans songs. Mahlungu supporters sang in support of the convict and also chanted the banned song Shoot the Boer, which originated as an anti-apartheid protest.

Judge John Horn rejected the defendant’s claim of self defence, saying Mahlungu showed a “flagrant disregard for the deceased’s right to life” when he beat Terre’Blanche with a pipe. He also rejected a claim Mahlunga, 30, had been raped by Terre’Blanche and had contracted HIV as a result. Mahlunga has said he did nothing wrong and Judge Horn said he “failed to express genuine remorse”.

Judge Horn also heard Mahlunga is of limited intelligence and was paid little for his work. His lawyer said he was upset at having not been paid, and drunk, when he killed Terre’Blanche. Nonetheless, the judge concluded there was “no valid reason to deviate from the prescribed sentence”.

Patrick Ndlovu, 18, was charged alongside Mahlunga but acquitted of murder and robbery. Ndlovu received a suspended sentence for housebreaking.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 5, 2010

South African government appeals for calm after death of white supremacist

South African government appeals for calm after death of white supremacist

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, April 5, 2010

South Africa
Related articles
Location of South Africa
South Africa (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Eugene Terreblanche
Image: Anton Raath.

Many of South Africa’s major political leaders are urging for calm after the recent murder of a prominent white supremacist leader, Eugene Terreblanche.

Terreblanche was killed last night at his home in South Africa’s North West province; police have arrested two males, aged 15 and 21, in connection with the murder. The suspects were workers at Terreblanche’s farm who were apparently involved in a wage dispute. Terreblanche died from injuries to his head, apparently from a machete and club.

In response to the killing, South African President Jacob Zuma called the murder “cowardly,” and said that it was a “sad moments for our country that a leader of his standing should be murdered.” South Africa’s Police Minister also asked for calm, saying that “We call on all South Africans across whatever divide—across the racial divide, across the political divide—to desist from making any inflammatory statements.”

Despite Zuma’s statement, opposition leaders said that his remarks, as well as those from other members of his party, increased tensions in the country. The Afrikaaner Resistance Movement, which Terreblanche led until his death, also called for calm, but said that the party “will decide upon the action we are going to take to avenge Mr Terreblanche’s death.”

Terreblanche was a prominent figure in South African politics, and had first emerged in the 1980s as leader of a small group who opposed the end of apartheid. Since then, he had been a proponent of creating an exclusively white republic in South Africa. Despite his political views, the ruling African National Congress denied that his murder had been motivated by politics, although Terreblanche’s party disputed that claim.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 27, 2008

No assassination plot against US presidential candidate Barack Obama

No assassination plot against US presidential candidate Barack Obama

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

2008 United States Presidential Election
Wikinews Election 2008.svg
2008 U.S. Presidential Election stories

Barack Obama.
Image: United States Senate.

Police in Denver, Colorado located in the United States say that three men who were arrested on August 25 for possessing drugs and weapons were not involved in a plot to assassinate US presidential candidate Barack Obama at the Democratic National Convention that night.

“[There was] insufficient evidence of any kind of plot or threat [against Obama]”, stated Troy Eid, Colorado’s district attorney who also said the men were making “racist rants” while high on methamphetamines.

“The alleged threats, hateful and bigoted though they were, involved a group of… methamphetamine abusers, all of whom were impaired at the time. The evidence involving the alleged threats does not warrant federal charges now,” said Eid. Authorities in Colorado will continue to investigate the individuals. “The law recognizes a difference between a true threat – one that can be carried out – and the reported racist rantings of a drug addict,” added Eid.

The alleged threat began when an unnamed female who was with the men stated to authorities that they were shouting racists words and remarks about Obama. At least two of the men are claimed to have ties to white supremacists.

The three men are identified as Tharin Gartrell, 28, Nathan Johnson, 32, and Shawn Robert Adolf, 33. Gartrell was the first suspect arrested. Police found him driving a rental truck while weaving around the road on August 25 and with him rifles,ammunition, drugs, disguises, 2-way radios, a bullet proof vest and identification badges for three unnamed people. Johnson was arrested a short time later and Adolf was arrested trying to escape from police by jumping out of a hotel window on the sixth floor. He broke his ankle and was taken to a local hospital for treatment.

Gartrell is facing charges of possessing drugs. Adolf and Johnson are charged with illegally possessing firearms and possessing methamphetamines. Johnson was also additionally charged with possessing body armor illegally.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 15, 2005

White supremacist New Zealanders provoked by Sydney riots

Filed under: Archived,Crime and law,New Zealand,Sydney,White supremacy — admin @ 5:00 am

White supremacist New Zealanders provoked by Sydney riots

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, December 15, 2005 Posters calling for “white power” have appeared at Wellington railway stations in New Zealand. The posters have been attributed to a group called “The White Crusaders of the Racial Holy War”.

Unlike the usenet postings in Australia being made by an unknown organisation “Action for Australia”, the White Crusaders of the Racial Holy War are well known. According to their website, they are “crusaders”, and believe in the CREATIVITY religion – created for the “Survival, Expansion, and Advancement of the White Race.”

The posters say “If Sydney can do it so can we… let’s take back our land”.

Leaders of the New Zealand National Party and United Future Party have condemned the posters. Don Brash leader of the New Zealand National Party said that the White Crusaders of the Racial Holy War are “a small, fascist underbelly, hell-bent on causing division and destroying New Zealand’s egalitarian ethos … they are thugs and bigots”

Bookmark-new.svg

Sources


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 16, 2005

Riots break out at Neo-Nazi rally in Toledo, Ohio

Riots break out at Neo-Nazi rally in Toledo, Ohio

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, October 16, 2005

Calm has been restored after a Saturday rally held by members of the National Socialist Movement (NSM) in Toledo, Ohio. led to a state of emergency being declared when riots ensued. Fifty highway patrol officers were called in to support city police and to help control the crowd. The unrest prompted the implementation of a city-wide 8 P.M. curfew.

The police force, which gave permission and protection to the neo-nazi group to hold the planned rally, claimed they were caught by surprise in the counter-protest that ensued. Police resorted to tear gas to disperse the crowd of nearly 500. Over 60 demonstrators were arrested.

Opposition to the rally was mounted by concerned citizens and a coalition of political groups organized as an Anti-Racist Action group. The actions of the counter-demontrators effectively ended the march just as it was getting started. During the riot, several vehicles had their windows broken and one was set on fire at a gas station; a local pub was looted and burned.

Toledo Mayor Jack Ford suggested that it was the NSM’s objective to incite violence, “Based on the intelligence we received, that’s exactly what they do — they come into town and get people riled up.” Mayor Ford, an African-American, was puzzled as to why the NSM chose Toledo, and said of the rally location, “It is not a neighborhood where you have a lot of friction in the first place.”

About 20 members of the International Socialists Organization and the One People’s Project were present in opposition to the NSM rally. The NSM has alleged these groups handed eggs to some African-American counter demonstrators.

The NSM bills itself as America’s Nazi Party and claims it was there to protest black gangs which, according to NSM spokesman Bill White, have been harassing white residents. White also claimed that the NSM received support from community activists and citizens.

In a statement on the NSM’s website, White stated, “Well, what happened is that little groups of our supporters started to gather at the police barricades, as they tried to figure out how to get in. The communists spotted one of those groups, and started running at them. That was the spark that lit the riot.”

In response to the NSM statements, the One People’s Project co-founder Daryle Lamont Jenkins said, “Bill White has done this to us before. In the past, he has written on his website that I and this organization orchestrated a rape, that I joined controversial communist organizations after being fired from a police force in New Jersey (I never worked for a police force in New Jersey) and even that I was soliciting nude photos of him!”

Jenkins continued, “In regards to what happened in Toledo on Saturday, we feel we should make our position clear. While white supremacists and other questionable groups have the right to speak, we have that right as well, and when these groups come out we will use that right to respond. In fact, we feel that we are obligated to do so given the fact that these groups are using these rights to advocate taking them and others from the rest of us.”

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 1, 2005

Ernst Zündel expelled from Canada

Ernst Zündel expelled from Canada – Wikinews, the free news source

Ernst Zündel expelled from Canada

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, March 1, 2005

White supremacist and Holocaust denier Ernst Zündel was expelled from Canada and arrived in Germany today. A Federal Court judge ruled that his anti-Semitic activities were “not only a threat to Canada’s national security, but also a threat to the international community of nations.”

In a press release given by B’nai Brith Canada, executive vice president Frank Dimant said that “For decades Zundel has spewed his venom and imbued his brand of hate in a new generation of white supremacist groups that had made him a hero … Zundel’s day of reckoning has finally come.” Canadian Jewish Congress National President Ed Morgan was quoted as saying that “this is a significant day for the Jewish community (of Canada) and for all those who treasure tolerance in a multicultural society … Zundel’s departure demonstrates Canada’s abhorrence for those who would propagate Holocaust denial and antisemitism. It brings closure to our efforts to bring this man to justice.”

Zündel’s Toronto lawyer, Peter Lindsay, said Zündel is “very disillusioned about the process and about being the victim of a secret trial, and now being deported based on evidence he’s never seen.”

Upon arriving in Germany, Zündel, 65, was immediately taken into custody by authorities on the grounds that he was running a web site denying the existence of the Holocaust, which is a crime in that country. Prosecutors in the city of Mannheim have issued a warrant for his arrest according to the Associated Press. A spokeswoman for the federal Justice Ministry, on condition of anonymity, said authorities were able to open a case against Zundel because his Holocaust-denying site can be accessed in Germany.

In 1977, Zündel founded a small press publishing house called Samisdat Publishers which issued such pamphlets as The Hitler We Loved and Why and Did Six Million Really Die? by Richard Harwood aka Richard Verrall (a British neo-Nazi leader) as well as booklets claiming that UFOs were actually Nazi secret weapons operated from secret Nazi military bases in Antarctica. Zundel lived in Canada for 42 years as a landed immigrant. His last two years were spent in a Toronto jail, where he was held under the Canadian security certificate law. The law was passed after the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States, and allows the Canadian government to hold suspects of terrorism without charge, based on secret evidence that does not have to be disclosed to a suspect or his defense.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress