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January 21, 2013

Famous house in old city of Bremen sold at public auction

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Monday, January 21, 2013

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An old house in Bremen, built 1630 and a private museum until a few years ago, was sold at public auction last Wednesday.

The auction started at 10:30 a.m. in room no. 108 of the Amtsgericht Bremen, the local Court of the city. According to German law, the bidder was ready to pay 10 percent of the purchase price immediately. About 30 persons were watching, and the price raised from 119.000 to 206.000 euro in the end.

The building is internationally known as Shipper’s House and was registered as heritage monument in 1973. In the same year, many other houses in Schnoor, the oldest part of the city, became heritage monuments, but this house is largely preserved as it was since 1750 — the year of the last great renovation. Therefore, one can find many old objects from the last 200 years inside.

Historians believe that it was the first hotel in the town, and city guides are telling the story of an old bathhouse. A legend says the bishop of Bremen had visited the house through an underground passage. The exit door is still visible today through the windows from the street. In front of the house there stands an old fountain, and the modern form has numerous historical predecessors. Perhaps here was the point of the origin of Bremen. The idea for the museum came from a previous owner who was officer in the German Navy and bought this house after the First World War in 1919.

The former owner of the house, Wolfgang Loose, has a guestbook with entries from many visitors. Among these were — among some mayors — the German minister for Foreign Affairs Hans-Dietrich Genscher. Loose also managed the Schnoor-Archiv, a small document center constructed in the 20th century, and his wife Annemarie showed the Shipper’s House to groups of tourists in the years around 1980 until 2000. The city of Bremen was not ready to buy the house from Loose because Bremen had the highest Governemnt debt among German federal states. Thus the environmental scientist Frank M. Rauch managed the house from 2005 until 2012 with different usages. Now the citizens of Bremen are looking forward how the new owner will use the house.



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January 17, 2013

Famous house in the old city of Bremen on public auction

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Thursday, January 17, 2013

An old house in Bremen, built 1630 and a private museum until a few years ago, was sold on public auction Wednesday, January 16. The auction started at 10:30 a.m. in room no. 108 of the Amtsgericht Bremen, the local Court of the city. According to German law, the bidder was ready to pay 10 percent of the purchase price immediately. About 30 persons were watching and the price raised from 119.000 to 204.000 euro in the end.

The building is internationally known as Shipper’s House and was registered as heritage monument in 1973. In the same year, many other houses in Schnoor, the oldest part of the city, became heritage monuments, but this house is largely preserved as it was since 1750 — the year of the last great renovation. Therefore, one can find many old objects from the last 200 years inside.

Historians believe that it was the first hotel in the town, and city guides are telling the story of an old bathhouse. A legend says the bishop of Bremen had visited the house through an underground passage. The exit door is still visible today through the windows from the street. In front of the house there stands an old fountain, and the modern form has numerous historical predecessors. Perhaps here was the point of the origin of Bremen. The idea for the museum came from a previous owner who was officer in the German Navy and bought this house after the First World War in 1919.

The former owner of the house, Wolfgang Loose, has a guestbook with entries from many visitors. Among these were — among some mayors — the German minister for Foreign Affairs Hans-Dietrich Genscher. Loose also managed the Schnoor-Archiv, a small document center constructed in the 20th century, and his wife Annemarie showed the Shipper’s House to groups of tourists in the years around 1980 until 2000. The city of Bremen was not ready to buy the house from Loose because Bremen had the highest Governemnt debt among German federal states. Thus the environmental scientist Frank M. Rauch managed the house from 2005 until 2012 with different usages.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Famous house in the old city of Bremen was sold on public auction

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, January 17, 2013

An old house in Bremen, built 1630 and a private museum until a few years ago, was sold on public auction Wednesday, January 16. The auction started at 10:30 a.m. in room no. 108 of the Amtsgericht Bremen, the local Court of the city. According to German law, the bidder was ready to pay 10 percent of the purchase price immediately. About 30 persons were watching, and the price raised from 119.000 to 206.000 euro in the end.

The building is internationally known as Shipper’s House and was registered as heritage monument in 1973. In the same year, many other houses in Schnoor, the oldest part of the city, became heritage monuments, but this house is largely preserved as it was since 1750 — the year of the last great renovation. Therefore, one can find many old objects from the last 200 years inside.

Historians believe that it was the first hotel in the town, and city guides are telling the story of an old bathhouse. A legend says the bishop of Bremen had visited the house through an underground passage. The exit door is still visible today through the windows from the street. In front of the house there stands an old fountain, and the modern form has numerous historical predecessors. Perhaps here was the point of the origin of Bremen. The idea for the museum came from a previous owner who was officer in the German Navy and bought this house after the First World War in 1919.

The former owner of the house, Wolfgang Loose, has a guestbook with entries from many visitors. Among these were — among some mayors — the German minister for Foreign Affairs Hans-Dietrich Genscher. Loose also managed the Schnoor-Archiv, a small document center constructed in the 20th century, and his wife Annemarie showed the Shipper’s House to groups of tourists in the years around 1980 until 2000. The city of Bremen was not ready to buy the house from Loose because Bremen had the highest Governemnt debt among German federal states. Thus the environmental scientist Frank M. Rauch managed the house from 2005 until 2012 with different usages.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 18, 2012

Attorney General vetos release of Prince Charles correspondence

Attorney General vetos release of Prince Charles correspondence

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Thursday, October 18, 2012

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Dominic Grieve, the Attorney General for England and Wales, has vetoed a request under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 to release correspondence sent by Prince Charles to government ministers while Tony Blair was Prime Minister from September 2004 to April 2005.

Prince Charles
Image: Dan Marsh.

The decision by the Attorney General overturns a previous decision by the Administrative Appeals Chamber which said there was a public interest in publishing the letters.

In a statement, Grieve made a case for it being in the public interest to not release the documents. He noted that the publication of the Prince’s correspondence would damage his preparation for kingship by damaging the public perception that he is “party-political neutral” by showing the Prince disagreeing with the policies of the government. Grieve then stated “[a]ny such perception would be seriously damaging to his role as future Monarch, because if he forfeits his position of political neutrality as heir to the Throne, he cannot easily recover it when he is King”.

Grieve’s statement did note that the letters from Prince Charles “reflect his personal and deeply held views and convictions” and “are in many cases particularly frank” but notes there is “nothing improper in the nature or content of these letters”.

Cquote1.svg [the] decision is a serious affront to British democracy Cquote2.svg

—Graham Smith

The Freedom of Information Act request was made by Rob Evans, a journalist writing for The Guardian. The Guardian stated they intend to take the government to court to challenge Grieve’s decision.

Graham Smith from the anti-monarchist group Republic said, “[the] decision is a serious affront to British democracy”. Smith argued: “Grieve has said this is about protecting prince Charles’s impartiality, but that impartiality doesn’t exist. Charles has made that clear. This decision is about pretending Charles is impartial while he continues to lobby in favour of his own political agenda. If Grieve believes Charles to be impartial then let him prove it by allowing the release of these documents.”

Prince Charles has been criticised in the past for repeated use of his power and influence. The architect Richard Rogers claimed that the Prince, who has strongly traditionalist views on architecture, repeatedly intervened to have projects cancelled which he was working on. Rogers criticised the decision not to release Charles’ correspondence: “It is not democratic to cover up his interventions.”



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August 31, 2010

Rem Koolhaas wins Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement

Rem Koolhaas wins Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement

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Tuesday, August 31, 2010

The Seattle Central Library, designed by Rem Koolhaas
Image: DVD R W.

Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas has been awarded the “Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement” at the opening ceremony of the 12th International Architecture Exhibition of the Venice Biennale, on August 28th. The decision was taken by the Board of the Biennale, upon the proposal of the Director of this year’s exhibition, Kazuyo Sejima. The Board stated that “Rem Koolhaas has expanded the possibilities of architecture. He has focused on the exchanges between people in space. He creates buildings that bring people together and in this way forms ambitious goals for architecture. His influence on the world has come well beyond architecture.” The Japanese architect Kazuyo Sejima, who won this year’s Pritzker Prize is the Biennale’s first female director.

Rem Koolhaas is renown as one of the founders of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) in 1975, and author of Delirious New York (1978) and S,M,L,XL (1995). Among his most important buildings are the Netherlands Dance Theatre at The Hague, the Nexus Housing at Fukuoka in Japan, the Kunsthal in Rotterdam, the Grand Palais of Euralille in Lille, the Villa dall’Ava in Paris, and the Seattle Public Library. One of his most recent projects is the China Central Television (CCTV) headquarters building in Beijing.

The Board also awarded a special Golden Lion in memory of the Japanese architect, Kazuo Shinohara, who died in 2006. The Golden Lion for the best National Participation was this year awarded to the Kingdom of Bahrain. Located in Venice‘s Arsenal and Giardini, the Biennale will be open until November 21.



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October 17, 2007

Floods spared historic Farnsworth House in Illinois

Floods spared historic Farnsworth House in Illinois

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Wednesday, October 17, 2007

The Farnsworth House as it appeared in 1971.

American preservationists breathed a sigh of relief in August as the Farnsworth House, a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe designed house widely considered a masterpiece of modern architecture, was spared by flooding along the Fox River in Plano.

Storms deluged much of the Midwest, causing rivers throughout the region to overflow their banks. At the Fox River in Plano flood waters spilled over four acres of the 58-acre Farnsworth House site. Waters continued to rise through August 24, until they were just 18 inches from the front door.

According to the reporting of the Chicago Tribune preservationists developed a disaster management plan on the spot. Staff used boats to access the house and once inside raised the vulnerable furnishings to higher levels atop crates.

Flooding along the Fox River in 1996 caused a large plate glass window in the steel and glass home to break, resulting in $250,000 damage and preservationists feared a repeat of that incident.

“We really lucked out and can look at this as a drill,” Barbara Campagna, architect for National National Trust for Historic Preservation, told Preservation Online.

The Farnsworth House was completed in 1951 and designed by internationally famous architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe for Chicago doctor Edith Farnsworth. The house is a National Historic Landmark and a nationally significant example of modern architecture. As one of the most famous examples of such architecture, the Farnsworth House was unprecedented at the time of its completion.

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June 19, 2005

Plan Magazine sold for €300,000 to Commercial Media Group

Plan Magazine sold for €300,000 to Commercial Media Group

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Sunday, June 19, 2005

Irish architecture magazine, Plan, has been sold for €300,000 to the Commercial Media Group. Commercial Media Group is the publisher of both Construction Industry Magazine, and Off-Site Construction Magazine.

Plan, which was founded 35 years ago, is published on a monthly basis and has a circulation of 3,500. Its readers generally work in the building industry and many are members of The Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland, The Institute of Designers in Ireland, and The Chartered Institute of Builders.

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March 22, 2005

American Thom Mayne snags Pritzker architecture prize

American Thom Mayne snags Pritzker architecture prize

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Tuesday, March 22, 2005

Longtime Los Angeles architect Thom Mayne was awarded this year’s Pritzker Architecture Prize. Established in 1979 to honor “consistent and significant contributions to humanity,” the prize is considered by many to be the highest honor in the field. The award includes a bronze medallion and US$100,000. Mayne was the first American to receive it in 14 years; previous American recipients include Robert Venturi (1991) and Frank Gehry (1989).

Mayne earned his architecture degree from the University of Southern California in 1968. A few years later he founded his own architecture school, the Southern California Institute of Architecture, which remains to this day. He then moved to Los Angeles, where in addition to running a firm, Morphosis, he teaches architecture at UCLA.

Mayne’s earlier work, considered “angry” and “brooding”, was outside of the architectural mainstream. His style was often called bold and audacious. This style has recently become more accepted, as Morphosis won contracts to design government buildings in California, Oregon, and Washington, DC. The firm also designed an Olympic village in Queens, in preparation for the city’s 2012 Olympics bid.

On receiving the prize, Mayne said, “This is such a big deal….it is not in my nature to think about being the one who prevails. For my whole life, I’ve always seen myself as an outsider.”

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