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August 19, 2013

General of Egyptian army intends to use full force to stop protests

General of Egyptian army intends to use full force to stop protests

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Monday, August 19, 2013

Taking no chances
Image: Al Jazeera English.

Egyptian General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi has announced that the army will no longer hold restraint against any remaining protesters. el-Sisi made his first public comments about the crack down on sit ins via Egyptian Television on Sunday, saying full force will be used against “attackers who want to destroy Egypt”.

Tension in Egypt is escalating as supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi are still protesting on the street as of Sunday despite the major crack down on sit ins by Egyptian army. According to Russia Today, Morsi followers have reacted to el-Sisi’s statement on Egyptian news by taking to the streets on Sunday afternoon. Several protest groups were said to be heading to the Constitutional court.

Officials within the Muslim Brotherhood stated that planned protests were not followed through due to “the presence of army snipers on buildings along the routes.” Crack downs on protests are believed to continue until pro-Morsi followers agree to stand down from their hope of re-instating Morsi.

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July 9, 2013

Mansour announces election plans for Egypt after violence and protests

Mansour announces election plans for Egypt after violence and protests

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Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Egypt
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Egyptians in Tahrir Square celebrating the removal of President Morsi on Sunday.

Last night, Adly Mansour, the interim leader of Egypt, announced plans to reform Egypt’s constitution and hold a new round of parliamentary and presidential elections. The interim president also announced a judicial investigation into yesterday’s shooting of at least 51 supporters of deposed president Mohamed Morsi.

Mansour plans to form a panel within fifteen days to review and suggest changes to the now-suspended constitution. Those amendments would be voted on in a referendum within four months. Parliamentary elections would then be held, perhaps in early 2014, followed by presidential elections upon the forming of a new parliament.

Yesterday in Cairo, protestors supporting Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood were shot outside the Presidential Guard barracks, where pro-Morsi supporters believe the former president is being kept under arrest. The Muslim Brotherhood claim 53 people died, while the health ministry claim 51 people died and 435 were injured. The Muslim Brotherhood claim the attack was unprovoked and those gathered were praying. Colonel Ahmed Mohammed Ali, spokesman for the army, said the group had attacked security forces and were armed with “large quantities of firearms, ammunition and Molotov cocktails”. The Muslim Brotherhood claimed children were killed in the conflict but Colonel Ali claims the photos being used by the Muslim Brotherhood are actually photos from Syria in March. Colonel Ali also stated two policemen and a soldier were killed.

One of the survivors, Mohamed Saber el-Sebaei, told journalists he was praying when the confrontation started: “Just before we finished, the shooting started. The army units that were standing in front of the Republican Guard headquarters first started shooting teargas, then live ammunition above people’s heads […] I was taking cover with another guy behind some rubble and I felt something hit my head. I held my prayer mat in my hand and I started to cover my head with it. But I couldn’t stop the bleeding because there was so much blood.”

The shooting of 51 people on Monday follows violence last week which killed 36 people in Cairo. The Muslim Brotherhood have asked supporters to protest non-violently and support peaceful vigils. Some within the Muslim Brotherhood movement have suggested they may be outlawed, as they were under Hosni Mubarak.

British Foreign Sectretary William Hague said: “It is crucial that there is a swift return to democratic processes in Egypt. All sides of the political spectrum should work together for the sake of the country’s political and economic future.”

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair said the intervention by the army was necessary to prevent “chaos”, and said the protests that led to the downfall of Morsi are due to dissatisfaction with the efficacy of government: “When governments don’t deliver, people protest. They don’t want to wait for an election.” Blair also blamed the “ideology and intolerance of the Muslim Brotherhood”: “People felt that the Brotherhood was steadily imposing its own doctrines on everyday life”. Blair advised Western governments to “engage with the new de facto power and help the new government make the changes necessary, especially on the economy, so they can deliver for the people. In that way, we can also help shape a path back to the ballot box that is designed by and for Egyptians”.



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July 1, 2013

Egyptian military issues ultimatum to Morsi

Egyptian military issues ultimatum to Morsi

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  • 16 February 2015: Islamic State execute 21 Coptic Christians held in Libya
  • 27 January 2015: Greek singer Demis Roussos dies aged 68
  • 23 December 2014: Egypt opens Rafah border crossing for additional day
  • 16 December 2014: Freighter hits fishing boat in Gulf of Suez; thirteen dead
  • 24 November 2014: Sisi: Egypt willing to send stabilizing forces to future Palestinian State
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Monday, July 1, 2013

Today the Egyptian military issued an ultimatum to Mohammed Morsi that gives him 48 hours, until Wednesday, to meet the demands of the hundreds of thousands of people protesting his presidency, by announcing a snap election, resigning, and allowing a provisional government to take over, or they will force a political transition.

Cquote1.svg For an institution of state to come and stage a coup against the president, this will not happen. Any force that goes against the constitution is a call for sabotage and anarchy. Cquote2.svg

—Yasser Hamza, member of the Freedom and Justice Party

The military said the protests were an “unprecedented” demonstration of the people’s will.

The ultimatum was issued by an unnamed official on Egyptian state television hours after the Muslim Brotherhood‘s headquarters in Cairo was taken over. Accompanied by an image of the Egyptian Defense Minister General Abdul Fatah Khalil Al-Sisi, the ultimatum read, “If the demands of the people are not met by the expiry of this deadline, the Armed Forces will announce a road-map for the future, and procedures that the Armed Forces will oversee with the participation of all political and national streams, including the youths, who were and still are the real force that ignited their glorious revolution, and without the exclusion of any party”, after which the television channel played patriotic music.

The military also said it would “not be a party in politics or rule,” and would enforce what the people wanted.

Mohammed Morsi at a press conference in June 2012.
Image: Jonathan Rashad.

The Muslim Brotherhood has denounced the ultimatum. Yasser Hamza, a member of the Freedom and Justice Party, the political party of the Muslim Brotherhood, said, “For an institution of state to come and stage a coup against the president, this will not happen. Any force that goes against the constitution is a call for sabotage and anarchy.”

The ultimatum was due to the hundreds of thousands of people that protested in Egyptian cities including Alexandria, {Cairo, Port Said, and Suez yesterday, the first anniversary of Morsi’s inauguration, and today, demanding Morsi resign. Some estimate the turnout was tens of thousands, some hundreds of thousands, and a military source estimated the number at almost fourteen million. In Cairo, the protesters were massed at Tahrir Square and outside the presidential palace. At least sixteen people died and 780 were injured in the protests, according to Egyptian Health Ministry spokesman Yehya Moussa.

Stones and petrol bombs were thrown at the headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood, which had been fortified with sandbags. Morsi was a leading member of the Brotherhood. The protesters say the Brotherhood fired on the protesters, killing five. Today the headquarters was overrun and looted.

Late Sunday, the National Salvation Front released a statement telling protesters to “maintain their peaceful [rallies] in all the squares and streets and villages and hamlets of the country… until the last of this dictatorial regime falls” and stated that this has “confirmed the downfall of the regime of Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood”. The National Salvation Front, a secular, liberal organization, has endorsed a petition calling for a snap election, started by the grassroots movement Rebel.

Cquote1.svg maintain their peaceful [rallies] in all the squares and streets and villages and hamlets of the country… until the last of this dictatorial regime falls Cquote2.svg

National Salvation Front in “Revolution Statement 1”

Protesters argue Morsi since taking power has failed to address political deadlock, economic crises, and personal safety problems. Many are angry at the Muslim Brotherhood, which they claim hijacked the Egyptian revolution, seizing authoritarian control and imposing Islamic law.

The BBC reported some protesters showed anti-American and anti-Israeli sentiment, noting one flag with a picture of Morsi in a Star of David.

A presidential spokesman, Ihab Fahmi, said people must “unite and listen to the sound of wisdom […] Political diversity necessitates on all parties to abide by the democratic process”. Another spokesman, Omar Amer, said “[Morsi] announced to all of Egypt’s people he made mistakes and that he is in the process of fixing these mistakes […] I want to confirm one truth, if there is a total lack of response to this initiative, no listening to it, no interest in it from any side, what do you think the presidency can do?”. Morsi has said he was validly elected, and denied instigating religious authority clauses in the new Egyptian constitution.


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December 6, 2012

Tanks, APCs deployed to presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt after deadly clashes

Tanks, APCs deployed to presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt after deadly clashes

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Thursday, December 6, 2012

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At least four tanks and several armored personnel carriers (APC) have been deployed outside the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt following clashes between supporters and opponents of president Mohamed Morsi where as many as six people were killed. More than 700 others have been reported injured.

Opponents of Morsi began camping outside the palace on Tuesday night after hundreds of thousands protested new presidential decrees in Tahrir Square. On Wednesday, supporters of Morsi stormed the encampment and tore down tents belonging to opponents and attacked them. Some threw rocks at them while others threw molotov cocktails, forcing opponents to retreat. Clashes continued into the early morning hours before subsiding.

“I’ve seen Molotov cocktails, people armed with iron bars and rocks, some people even pulling branches off of trees in terms of trying to find some kind of weapon to fight with”, said Elizabeth Arrott, a reporter with Voice of America who was at the palace when clashes were taking place. Several journalists were also reported attacked in the clashes. People on each side have blamed the other for starting the violence.

Protests both in support of and opposing Morsi broke out around Egypt after he enacted new powers on November 22 that include making his decisions free from judicial oversight. Hisham Kandil, Egypt’s prime minister, called for calm, to “give the opportunity for the efforts being made now to begin a national dialogue”. A referendum is to be presented on December 15 outlining a new constitution for the country.



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December 5, 2012

Clashes in Egypt between supporters and opponents of president Morsi turn deadly

Clashes in Egypt between supporters and opponents of president Morsi turn deadly

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Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Egypt
Other stories from Egypt
  • 16 February 2015: Islamic State execute 21 Coptic Christians held in Libya
  • 27 January 2015: Greek singer Demis Roussos dies aged 68
  • 23 December 2014: Egypt opens Rafah border crossing for additional day
  • 16 December 2014: Freighter hits fishing boat in Gulf of Suez; thirteen dead
  • 24 November 2014: Sisi: Egypt willing to send stabilizing forces to future Palestinian State
…More articles here
Location of Egypt

A map showing the location of Egypt

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Egypt, see the Egypt Portal
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At least two people in Cairo, Egypt have died after clashes at the presidential palace broke out between supporters and opponents of president Mohamed Morsi. Dozens more were injured.

On Tuesday night, opponents of Morsi set up tents and began camping outside the palace. On Wednesday, reports say supporters of Morsi stormed the encampment and tore down tents belonging to opponents and attacked them. Some threw rocks at them while others threw molotov cocktails, forcing opponents to retreat.

Protests both in support of and opposing Morsi broke out around Egypt after he enacted new powers on November 22 that include making his decisions free from judicial oversight. A referendum is to be presented on December 15 outlining a new constitution for the country.



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November 28, 2012

Thousands protest constitutional decree in Tahrir Square, Egypt

Thousands protest constitutional decree in Tahrir Square, Egypt

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Wednesday, November 28, 2012

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File image of protests in Tahrir Square in 2011.
Image: Lilian Wagdy.

An estimated over 100,000 people protested in Tahrir Square yesterday in opposition to a constitutional decree made by Egypt’s President Mohamed Morsi. Riot police dispersed the crowd with tear gas as clashes began. One fatality has been reported.

The constitutional decree made November 22 by Morsi protected the constitution drafting body of Egypt from dissolution and also protected executive decisions from being overturned. The decree has sparked protests and strikes reminiscent of protests which eventually toppled the then president Hosni Mubarak.

Earlier this year in September Egyptian courts ruled to dissolve Egypt’s parliament. Morsi opposed the ruling, threatening action, but later respected the decision.

Mohamed ElBaradei said Morsi is acting like a “new pharaoh“. In a comment to Der Spiegel, he said, “Not even the pharaohs had so much authority, to say nothing of his predecessor Hosni Mubarak. This is a catastrophe, it [is] a mockery of the revolution that brought him to power.”

ElBaradei has also said that because of the recent decree “a civil war threatens to erupt in Egypt.”

Morsi has stated the decree is temporary. He met with Egypt’s judiciary on Monday.

Counter demonstration planned by the Muslim Brotherhood and Nour Party has been cancelled to avoid possible further violence.



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August 31, 2012

Egyptian President Morsi backs Syrian rebels in speech

Egyptian President Morsi backs Syrian rebels in speech

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Friday, August 31, 2012

Mohamed Morsi (left) pictured in June.
Image: Jonathan Rashad.

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi strongly backed the Syrian rebels Thursday in a speech at the Non-Aligned Movement Summit in Iran. Morsi, a Sunni Muslim and member of the Muslim Brotherhood, is the first Egyptian leader in 30 years to visit Iran – an ally of Syrian Prime Minister Bashar al-Assad’s Shi’ite dominated regime.

In a strongly worded speech, which caused Syrian foreign minister Walid al Muallem to walk out in protest, Morsi called the Syrian regime “oppressive”, saying that it has lost legitimacy. Delegates were told, “[t]he bloodshed in Syria is our responsibility on all our shoulders and we have to know that the bloodshed cannot stop without effective interference from all of us.”

Morsi called on delegates to “[…] announce our full solidarity with the struggle of those seeking freedom and justice in Syria, and translate this sympathy into a clear political vision that supports a peaceful transition to a democratic system of rule that reflects the demands of the Syrian people for freedom.”

For the Syrian government, foreign minister al Muallem subsequently told state media that President Morsi was interfering in Syrian domestic affairs and inciting further violence in the conflict.

Morsi’s speech was viewed by commentators as a direct rebuke to Iran and a message that they had chosen the wrong side in the Syrian conflict. The speech also allayed fears in the west that his attendance at a meeting of non-aligned countries indicated a change in Egyptian foreign policy to a less pro-Western stance.



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August 30, 2012

Egyptian President Morsi makes state visit to China

Egyptian President Morsi makes state visit to China

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Egypt
Other stories from Egypt
  • 16 February 2015: Islamic State execute 21 Coptic Christians held in Libya
  • 27 January 2015: Greek singer Demis Roussos dies aged 68
  • 23 December 2014: Egypt opens Rafah border crossing for additional day
  • 16 December 2014: Freighter hits fishing boat in Gulf of Suez; thirteen dead
  • 24 November 2014: Sisi: Egypt willing to send stabilizing forces to future Palestinian State
…More articles here
Location of Egypt

A map showing the location of Egypt

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Egypt, see the Egypt Portal
Flag of Egypt.svg

Thursday, August 30, 2012

Mohamed Morsi (left) pictured in June.
Image: Jonathan Rashad.

Egyptian President, Mohamed Morsi, began an official state visit to China last Tuesday. This is Morsi’s first state visit outside the Middle East since taking office in June this year.

The trip is seen by analysts as an attempt to forge stronger economic and diplomatic ties with Beijing, and to access Chinese capital and expertise. Events scheduled for the visit include meeting with Chinese President Hu Jintao and prominent business figures. It is expected the two countries will agree to cooperate on a number of large infrastructure projects, including desalination and power generation — with this hoped to boost Egypt’s faltering economy. China has made an increasing number of foreign investments in recent years, in an attempt to increase its international standing. Trade between the two countries increased by 40% between 2008 and 2011 to US$ 8.8 billion.

Egypt continues to receive over US$ 1 billion annually in aid from the United States; however, the funds are believed to not come without conditions. Academic Peter Mandaville, of Georgetown University, suggested that Morsi’s visit was part of a “[…] broader effort by Egypt to signal that it’s going to diversify its portfolio of relationships”.



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