Wiki Actu en

November 26, 2011

Borneo bridge collapse kills at least three as vehicles fall

Borneo bridge collapse kills at least three as vehicles fall

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Indonesia
Related articles
  • 4 July 2015: C-130 Hercules crashes in Medan, Indonesia
  • 18 May 2015: Over 900 asylum seekers rescued off Indonesian coast
  • 1 May 2015: Two Australians executed in Indonesia over 2005 drug smuggling case
  • 8 February 2015: Divers retrieve 100th corpse from Java Sea jet crash
  • 30 December 2014: AirAsia disaster: Bodies, wreckage found
Location of Indonesia
Indonesia (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

At least three people died today and seventeen more were injured after a road bridge collapsed on the Indonesian island of Borneo. At least three cars, several motorbikes, and a public bus all fell into the Mahakam River.

File photo of the Islanic centre in Samarinda, with the Mahakam River in the foreground.
Image: Hidayat008.

The bridge was constructed from concrete roughly a decade ago to resemble California’s Golden Gate Bridge, and links the East Kalimantan towns of Tenggarong and Samarinda. Police say there is no indication of why it failed. Completed in 2001, work started in 1995 and locals called it “Kalimantan’s Golden Gate Bridge.”

The wounded have been hospitalised, some with broken bones. The scene at the bridge, in Kutai Kartanegara district, was filled with screams in the aftermath of the collapse. The suspension bridge was erected by state-owned builders PT Hutama Karya and one segment has fallen into the water. Some vehicles are close to entirely submerged, and Indonesia Today suggests as many as 100 people may be injured. One damaged car was left inverted and suspended above the water.

Harmoni Adi, head of a search and rescue agency, said “[t]he death toll is likely to increase,” after the 4:30pm local time collapse, with rescuers in Tenggarong searching the river for survivors. Some people swam ashore after falling from the structure, which spanned 700 metres. An eyewitness described heavy traffic on the bridge when it came down.


 
This story has updates
 
See Borneo bridge collapse: death toll reaches four, many remain missing, November 27, 2011,
Death toll from Borneo bridge collapse reaches eleven, November 28, 2011
 

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 18, 2008

At least 728 rescued from burning Indonesian ferry

At least 728 rescued from burning Indonesian ferry

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, May 18, 2008

At least 706 passengers and 22 crew have been rescued after fire broke out on the top deck of an Indonesian passenger ferry. According to ABC News citing Sampit Police Chief Jihartono talking to ElShinta, at least 712 passengers and 57 crew were rescued.

The boat was sailing from Surabaya, East Java to the port of Sampit, which is inland on the Mentaya river in Borneo. The ferry had reached the river and was near the town of Samuda when fire broke out.

A number of boats were nearby at the time and were able to assist with rescue operations, as were residents on the river bank. It is believed that all on board were safely rescued, with four hospitalised and the rest in shelters at the riverside, but it is difficult to be sure because ferries often carry more passengers than manifestos suggest in Indonesia, where they are a major form of transport between the many islands that comprise the nation. Most of the passengers worked at local palm oil plantations.

Harbour official Abdul Kadir told the press “The boat had no adequate fire-fighting equipment, so efforts were dedicated to rescuing the people on board,” and said that transport officials and police have arrived at the scene. It took five hours to extuinguish the blaze, and an investigation will be conducted.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 8, 2007

Forest preservation plan debated at climate talks

Forest preservation plan debated at climate talks

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, December 8, 2007

Inside the conference centre.
Image: Oxfam International.

Delegates at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Indonesia are wrestling with a proposal that would allow developing nations to earn billions of dollars through carbon trading by leaving idle forests such as those in Borneo, the Amazon and Congo basins.

The news comes on the same day that it was announced that forest clearance in the Amazon Rainforest was falling compared to previous years.

Delegates from about 190 countries are negotiating a plan for private companies and wealthy nations to pay poorer nations to keep their forest intact. It is called the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation in Developing Countries, or REDD proposal.

Environmental scientists say tree cutting in tropical areas accounts for about 20 percent of all man-made carbon dioxide emissions blamed for global warming. Tropical forests soak up vast amounts of carbon dioxide; burning timber to clear land releases it.

Marcelo Furtado with Greenpeace in Brazil says the REDD plan is needed to fill gaps in the current Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement to limit emissions of greenhouse gases which does not include ways to preserve forests.

“We would like to see, at the very least, a REDD mechanism moving forward, because we want to see countries taking action now. We don’t want to wait to 2013 to start seeing this action taking place. And this is something this convention, this group of countries could deliver,” said Furtado.

Frances Seymour, Director General for the Indonesia-based Center for International Forest Research, is concerned a premature REDD agreement could do more harm than good.

Greenpeace’s Rainbow Warrior arriving in Bali yesterday for the UN climate conference.
Image: OpenDemocracy.

“Because in many forested countries, land tenure rights to forest lands and resources are either unclear or contested or both. And you can imagine that if a potential new income stream is available for those who can present themselves as owners of the forest, this could create conflict and create conditions under which some of the world’s poorest people, who are people who live in forests, could be pushed aside,” said Seymour.

Financial analysts are also cautious about the proposal.

Charlotte Streck, the director of Climate Focus, a Rotterdam-based consultancy, said investors are worried about how governments would monitor their forests and ensure the carbon stored in them remains intact.

“This is what makes the private sector nervous, because these are risks that they cannot hedge properly, and that they cannot evaluate in the same manner as the project related risks,” she said.

Conference delegates are still debating how to monitor the world’s remaining tropical forests, how to stop logging in one place without shifting the problem to another area, and how to estimate the amount of carbon in a piece of land.

Yvo de Boer, the U.N.’s climate change chief, said a REDD agreement is unlikely during this conference, but a group working on the details is making significant progress.



Sources


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 10, 2007

Wikinews Shorts: June 10, 2007

Wikinews Shorts: June 10, 2007 – Wikinews, the free news source

Wikinews Shorts: June 10, 2007

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

A compilation of brief news reports for Sunday, June 10, 2007.

Bush speaks for Kosovo independence

Location of Kosovo.

U.S. President George W. Bush said today the United Nations needs to act on independence for the breakaway Serbian province of Kosovo. “We need to get moving… and the end result is independence,” Bush said at a news conference in Albania.

Sources


Sultan of Brunei’s daughter wedded in lavish, two-week ceremony

Location of Brunei.

The newlywed daughter of Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah was presented to the public in a lavish ceremony today in Bandar Seri Bagawan, the culmination of two weeks of celebration, steeped in Malay Muslim tradition.

Princess Majeedah Nuurul Bulqiah, 31, the 11th daughter of one of the world’s richest men, and Khairul Khalil, 32, an official in the prime minister’s office of the tiny, oil-rich country on Borneo, exchanged their vows on Thursday. The celebration continues tomorrow, with a banquet hosted by the sultan.

Sources


At least 61 dead from Cyclone Gonu in Middle East

Cyclone Gonu on June 4.

At least 61 people died in Iran and Oman in last week’s Cyclone Gonu, the strongest tropical cyclone to hit the Arabian Sea.

Iranian state media reported a total of 12 deaths today. In Oman, 49 deaths have been reported, with 27 people missing.

Related

Sources


Deadly floods sweep southern China

Map shows annual precipitation in China.

Four days of heavy rains in southern China caused flooding and landslides that have left at least 66 people dead today.

“Floods caused by heavy rains have affected about 294,800 hectares of crops, completely destroying 53,000 hectares of them,” a Ministry of Civil Affairs official was quoted as saying by Xinhua. The storms have destroyed 48,000 homes and forced about 591,000 people to evacuate from their homes in Hunan, Guandong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Jianxi and Fujian provinces.

Sources



Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 31, 2007

Malaysian court rules Christian woman can\’t remove Islam from ID

Malaysian court rules Christian woman can’t remove Islam from ID

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, May 31, 2007

Malaysia
Other stories from Malaysia
…More articles here
Location of Malaysia

A map showing the location of Malaysia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Malaysia, see the Malaysia Portal
Flag of Malaysia.svg

A Malaysian Christian woman who has been fighting a six-year legal battle to have the word Islam removed from her national identification card has lost an appeal with the Malaysian Federal Court. The three-judge panel rejected the appeal in a 2-1 decision on Tuesday in Putrajaya.

Lina Joy, 42, was born Azlina Jailani to Malay parents, and was raised as a Muslim. Malaysia’s constitution guarantees freedom of religion, but by law, all ethnic Malays are Muslim.

Joy converted to Christianity at age 26, and after some bureaucratic difficulties had her named legally changed in 1999. However, on her MyKad national ID, the National Registration Department retained her stated religion as Islam. In order to have her religion changed, the National Registration Department said Joy would have to obtain a certificate of apostasy from the Muslim Sharia Court.

Cquote1.svg I am hoping that my case would have made a difference to the development of constitutional issues in the plight of many others. Cquote2.svg

—Lina Joy

But under Sharia law, Muslims are not allowed to convert, nor may they marry outside their religion. But since she is no longer a Muslim, Joy has said she should not be bound by that law.

She applied to Malaysia’s High Court in April 2001 to legally renounce her religion, but was refused, with the court saying the issue must be decided by the Sharia Court. The Court of Appeal rejected the case in September 2005.

In Tuesday’s ruling at the Palace of Justice, Justice Ahmad Fairuz and Federal Court Judge Alauddin Mohd Sheriff rejected the appeal, while Justice Richard Malanjum dissented. The hearing was the final legal step Joy could take, although her lawyer, Benjamin Dawson, said he was considering filing for a review of the judgment.

Joy received the verdict with “great sorrow”, the New Straits Times reported.

“I am disappointed that the Federal Court is not able to vindicate a simple but important fundamental right that exists in all persons; namely, the right to believe in the religion of one’s choice and equally important, the right to marry a person of one’s choice and to raise a family in the Malaysia context,” Joy was quoted in a statement from her lawyer, and published in The Star. “The Federal Court has not only denied me that right but to all Malaysians who value fundamental freedoms.

“I am hoping that my case would have made a difference to the development of constitutional issues in the plight of many others.”

Joy has since been disowned by her family, and forced to quit her job. A Muslim lawyer who supported her case received death threats. Joy went into hiding last year, and is believed to be living outside Malaysia. Now, it’s not likely she will return, The Star reported. “It would extremely difficult to exercise freedom of conscience in the present environment,” she was quoted as by the paper.

Muslim groups welcomed the verdict, while rights groups condemned it.

“It’s clearly justified and fair,” Yusri Muhd, president of The Defenders of Islam Coalition, was quoted as saying by Channel NewsAsia. “We hope that we’ve seen the last of such an attempt.”

Ivy Josiah of the Women’s Aid Organization said was “deeply disappointed” by the ruling, she said her group was encouraged by the dissenting judgment “which means there’s still light at the end of the tunnel.”

The lone dissenting justice, Chief Judge of Sabah and Sarawak Richard Malanjum, wrote: “To expect the appellant to apply for a certificate of apostasy – when to do so would likely expose her to a range of offenses under the Islamic law – is, in my view, unreasonable.”

Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Lina Joy
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 25, 2007

Rare rhino caught on videotape

Rare rhino caught on videotape – Wikinews, the free news source

Rare rhino caught on videotape

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Screenshot of the Borneo Rhino caught on videotape. Credit: WWF.

A camera set up in the jungles of Malaysian Borneo in Sabah by the World Wide Fund for Nature or WWF, has captured, for the first time, a Borneo Rhino on videotape.

“This astonishing footage captures of one of the world’s most elusive creatures. Tremendous progress has been made in recent years to secure the rhino’s habitat but so much more needs to be done considering this species may very well disappear in the next 10 years,” said President and CEO of the World Wildlife Fund in a press release, Carter Roberts.

In the video, the rhino comes out of the jungle brush and then proceeds to sniff the camera and equipment surrounding it. The video also shows the rhino getting a bite to eat.

It is estimated that there are only 25 to 50 of the rhinos alive on the planet, and they can only be found in the jungles of Sabah, or better known as the “Heart of Borneo.” For the past 20 years, the rhino has not been reported anywhere else in Sabah and researchers say that it is likely “extinct” in the rest of Malaysia.

Researchers say that poaching to use the rhino’s horn in medicine and encroachment into their habitats are causing them to decline. Researchers also say that because the rhino is so isolated from the rest of Malaysia, that they are rarely able to breed together.

“The rhino is very sensitive to the presence of human beings. Till now, we can still see the rhino, but if we cannot develop any kind of protection method, I think the rhinos will survive less than 10 years,” said a project manager for the WWF for elephants and rhinos in the Borneo region, Raymond Alfred.

In 2006, the first ever still image was captured of the rhino.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 20, 2006

Haze covers Southeast Asia

Haze covers Southeast Asia – Wikinews, the free news source

Haze covers Southeast Asia

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 20, 2006

The haze situation in Southeast Asia has still not subsided, despite efforts by the Indonesian government to douse the flames. In Singapore, the Pollutant Standards Index hit 103, in the unhealthy range, at 8AM (GMT+8); Malaysia’s capital, Kuala Lumpur, is also covered in smoke, with the Air Pollution Index (or Air Quality Index) in the Klang Valley region registering at 103.

The latest pictures from satellites NOAA 12 and NOAA 18 show a combined total of 107 hotspots in Borneo and 89 in Sumatra

Related

  • “Haze in South East Asia worsens” — Wikinews, October 6, 2006

Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 6, 2006

Haze in South East Asia worsens

Haze in South East Asia worsens – Wikinews, the free news source

Haze in South East Asia worsens

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 6, 2006

Stock photo of haze in Malaysia

The acrid haze situation in Southeast Asia is worsening. Visibility has been severely reduced in neighboring countries and some schools have been closed due to the health hazard posed. The annual smoke season is caused by illegal slash and burn clearance of land in Indonesia, particularly the island of Borneo.

The haze has spread over 2,250 miles (3,600 kilometers) into neighboring countries such as Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, and even drifting to Guam in the western Pacific.

Aviation has been severely impaired in Indonesia, where in certain areas, visibility is only a mere 200 to 300 meters. Helicopter service in Malaysia’s Sarawak state, a key mode of transportation there, has been halted due to the poor visibility. A Mandala Airlines Boeing 737-200 carrying a 110 people had overshot the runway at Tarakan airport in Kalimantan province in Indonesia. The aircraft came partly to rest in a nearby swamp. Visibility at the time was around 400 meters, 600 meters short of Indonesian landing safety regulations.

Schools in Thailand, and Indonesia have also been forced to closed, and look likely to stay closed well into next week.

Air pollution indices around the region have also registered a spike in poor air quality. Sarawak state’s index came in at 106-188 with 100-200 being unhealthy. In Malay peninsula, the air pollution index in five states came in at 101-116. In Singapore, the Pollution Standards Index registered between 80-130 with 81-100 in the moderate range and 101-200 in the unhealthy range.

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

Wikinews journalist Timlee90 reports:

The air quality here in Singapore is so bad that I could feel the dust in my mouth as I was walking on the streets today. The air constantly smells of burning wood and visibility is never more than a kilometer. Singaporeans I know are concerned about the deteriorating situation.

Timothy Low, a Singaporean who’s just finished his national service says that he is concerned about the situation, “I can’t run to exercise. People with lung related problems have difficulty breathing; It causes tearing also.” The government here has advised citizens to reduce vigorous activity, especially those with existing heart or lung conditions.

– Timlee90, Singapore

The Indonesian government has been criticized by environmentalist groups such as Greenpeace, which claims that the allowed conversion of forests into cropland is the cause of the problem. The also call on the Indonesian government to “investigate and hold liable plantation companies responsible for slash and burn clearing”.

The Indonesian government has responded to the criticism that it is doing all that it can do. “We don’t know when we can put out the fires but we are working tirelessly and have spent billions of rupiah (hundreds of thousands of dollars) in our efforts,” Forestry Minister Malem Sambat Kaban said. “As for complaints from neighbouring countries, there’s nothing else we can do. We don’t cause the fires deliberately.”

In 1997-98, the haze cost the Southeast Asian region an estimated US$9.0 billion by disrupting air travel and other business activities

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 28, 2006

Chameleon snake discovered in Borneo

Filed under: Archived,Biology,Borneo,Germany,Species discovery,United States — admin @ 5:00 am

Chameleon snake discovered in Borneo – Wikinews, the free news source

Chameleon snake discovered in Borneo

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, June 28, 2006

Scientists from the United States and Germany have discovered a new species of snake capable of changing it’s colours, in the Betung Kerihun National Park on the island of Borneo.

Researchers Mark Auliya from the Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig in Bonn and a consultant for the World Wildlife Federation(WWF), and John Murphy and Harold Voris from the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago were collecting specimens from the wetlands of the Kapuas river when they stumbled upon the snake’s colour changing ability.

“I put the reddish-brown snake in a dark bucket,” Auliya explained. “When I retrieved it a few minutes later, it was almost entirely white.”

The ability to change colour is known from some reptiles, famously the chameleon, but scientists have seen it very rarely with snakes and are yet to understand the phenomenon. In chameleons, colour change is an expression of it’s physiological condition. Skin color is also influenced by light and temperature.

The two snakes, initially brown with an iridescent sheen, are about a half metre long and venomous. The scientists named them the ‘Kapus-Mud-Snake’.

They are believed to belong to the Enhydris genus, which is composed of 22 species of rear-fanged water snakes, only two of which are widespread. The scientists believe this newly discovered snake might only occur in the Kapuas river drainage system.

“The discovery of the “chameleon” snake exposes one of nature’s best kept secrets deep in the Heart of Borneo.” Said Stuart Chapman, WWF’s international coordinator of the Heart of Borneo Programme. “Its ability to change colour has kept it hidden from science until now.”

In the last ten years 361 new animal and plants species have been discovered on the island of Borneo, however, WWF says wildlife in the region is threatened by deforestation. Today, only half of Borneo’s forest cover remains, down from 75 per cent in the mid 1980s.

There is hope, however, that this trend can be halted. Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia – the three governments which hold jurisdiction over Borneo – recently launched the Heart of Borneo initiative. This aims to preserve approximately 220,000km2 of equatorial forests and numerous wildlife species.

Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress