Wiki Actu en

February 20, 2013

Australian Governor-General visits Wagga Wagga

Australian Governor-General visits Wagga Wagga

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Quentin Bryce speaks with SES Murrumbidgee controller, James McTavish and the Mayor of Wagga Wagga, Rod Kendall.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce speaks with SES volunteers.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce speaks with VRA volunteers.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce and the Mayor of Wagga Wagga, Rod Kendall at Wagga Beach.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce, with the Team Navy and the “50 Shades of Grey” gumi.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce views the gumi’s with event organiser and South Wagga Apex volunteer, Glenn Maslin.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce speaks with the General Manager of the Wagga Wagga City Council, Phil Pinyon and the Mayor of Wagga Wagga Rod Kendall.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce speaks with spectators at Cabarita Park during the 2013 Gumi Race.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce and her husband, Michael Bryce.
Image: Bidgee.

Quentin Bryce, addressing the media.
Audio recording by: Bidgee.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Australia
Related articles
  • 11 June 2015: 16-year-old girl charged with attempted murder in Melbourne, Australia
  • 5 June 2015: Australian businessman Alan Bond dies aged 77
  • 30 May 2015: Non-parole period extended to 43 years for Australian rapist and murderer
  • 28 May 2015: Western Australia police close in on murder suspect, arrest warrant issued
  • 28 May 2015: Joe Hockey agrees to lobby states to ditch tampon tax
Location of Australia
Australia (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Wagga Wagga, New South Wales — Sunday, Governor-General of Australia, Quentin Bryce and her husband, Michael Bryce, visited the city of Wagga Wagga to launch the Junior Teams event and present the awards to the winners at the 2013 Allen’s Coaches World Championship Gumi, meet the North Wagga Wagga residents who were affected by the March 2012 floods and meet a small group of volunteers from the NSW RFS, SES and the VRA at a community barbecue at Wagga Beach.

After the Gumi presentations, Governor-General Bryce addressed the media about the Gumi, stating that “It’s so quirky and I love the way it brings this community together, this community that’s known for its fantastic spirit.” She also commented on the floods which affected the suburb of North Wagga in March 2012. Bryce stated that “A very special thing for me was being at North Wagga Wagga this morning, to see people again whom I meet almost a year ago after the devastation of the floods in that part of the city, […] So many people have a long way to recover but their spirit, resilience, courage and determination, what they’ve been though, is a source for inspiration to all of us.”



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 21, 2012

Wikinews interviews United States disability skier Jasmin Bambur

Wikinews interviews United States disability skier Jasmin Bambur

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, December 21, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews United States Paralympic skier Jasmin Bambur

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with United States Paralympic skier Jasmin Bambur who was at Copper Mountain, Colorado for the IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png We’re interviewing Jasmin Bambur. He is a guy. He’s from Serbia, right?

Jasmin Bambur: Yes, ma’am, I am from Serbia but I race for US Paralympic.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How did a Serb end up racing for the USA?

Jasmin Bambur: It’s very simple. You just get married to a fine American lady and she give you citizenship and you ski fast and you get on the team. That’s very simple.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Why do the Australians love you so?

Jasmin Bambur: We’re a very small community, as ski racers, and we’re always great friends. So we kind of hang out together and help each other out. And then in the end, depends who wins, either hate them or love them.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They said you’re some sort of professional racquetball player or something?

Jasmin Bambur: It’s actually team handball. It’s a sport [where] you have seven players like rugby. And yes, I played it professionally until I was 18 in Europe. And when war started in Kosovo, I moved to the United States and that’s how I end up here.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You weren’t always a sit skier?

Jasmin Bambur: I am a sit skier now but actually the reason I am a sit skier is I had a car accident in 2000. I fell asleep driving. Driving and sleeping don’t go together. I don’t know why.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Yeah, that’s a difficult lesson to learn. So how have you been doing at this event?

Jasmin Bambur: Skiing? I’ve been skiing for about ten years, racing about four. And so far it’s going great.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You won a medal, at this thing, right? One of these days?

Jasmin Bambur: I won two medals in Super G, two third places, and yesterday I got second place in slalom.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And what’s your favourite one?

Jasmin Bambur: Favourite is Super G.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Because you go fast?

Jasmin Bambur: Yes, fast and very little turning. So that’s my pick[?].

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Thank you very, very much.

Jasmin Bambur: No problem.

Jasmin Bambur at Solitude Station on Copper Mountain.
Image: Bidgee.

Jasmin Bambur competing in the Super G during the 2012 IPC Nor Am Cup at Copper Mountain, Colorado.
Image: Bidgee.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 20, 2012

Wikinews interviews Canadian Paralympic skier Vanessa Knight

Wikinews interviews Canadian Paralympic skier Vanessa Knight

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews Canadian Paralympic skier Vanessa Knight

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with Canadian Paralympic skier Vanessa Knight who was at Copper Mountain, Colorado for the IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png We’re interviewing Vanessa Knight, who’s from Canada.

Vanessa Knight: That’s right!

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And what kind of skier are you?

Vanessa Knight: I am a disabled racer. I have a left arm amputation and I’m a speed skier.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you’re one of the standing skiers.

Vanessa Knight: Yes.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I’ve been asking a lot of Paralympic disability skiers, what is the craziest skier of the slope? The standing ones, the blind ones, or the mono skiers?

Vanessa Knight: Oh my God, the blind ones for sure. I couldn’t imagine throwing myself down a hill without seeing anything. Especially the B1s. They have duct tape on their goggles.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Where from Canada are you from?

Vanessa Knight: I’m from Quebec. Montreal.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And how long have you been skiing?

Vanessa Knight: I’ve just entered my fourth year.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And are you going to Sochi?

Vanessa Knight: I hope so!

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you going to beat… oh! Australia doesn’t have any skiers for you to beat. Do you think the level of competition for women’s disability skiing is high enough to give the sport a future?

Vanessa Knight: I think the level of competition is high enough, yes. But I still think we need more racers and people to get involved and really promote the sport, because, I mean, the more the merrier, right?

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Why are there so many men in skiing compared to women?

Vanessa Knight: I guess some girls are just scared and they don’t want to throw themselves out there. But I’m not like that and neither are the rest of the girls here. They’re not afraid to throw themselves down a hill and go fast.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think skiers are some of the craziest Paralympic athletes?

Vanessa Knight: Oh definitely.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Is there anything you want to say about disability skiing in Canada that people in Australia or the world should know?

Vanessa Knight: Pretty much to say: It’s really cold in Canada. And we love it!

Vanessa Knight at Solitude Station on Copper Mountain.
Image: Bidgee.

Vanessa Knight competing in the Super G during the second day of the 2012 IPC Nor Am Cup at Copper Mountain, Colorado.
Image: Bidgee.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 19, 2012

Wikinews interviews New Zealand Paralympic skier Adam Hall

Wikinews interviews New Zealand Paralympic skier Adam Hall

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews New Zealand Paralympic skier Adam Hall

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with New Zealand Paralympic skier Adam Hall who was at Copper Mountain, Colorado for the IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png We’re interviewing famous Kiwi Paralympic legend Adam Hall, Paralympic skier. What classification are you?

Adam Hall: An LW1.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png LW1. So you are a standing skier?

Adam Hall: Stand up skier.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And how does a Kiwi end up skiing? Because it’s not known as the world’s greatest country for skiing.

Adam Hall: Oh, actually we have quite a lot of good resources down in New Zealand for skiing and a lot of world class athletes and countries from all over the world come down to New Zealand and train during the off season. So, actually, kind of world-renowned for skiing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png New Zealand’s had a couple of really famous skiers compared to their neighbour [Australia], right?

Adam Hall: Yeah I guess so. Especially in the able bodied world. Back in the early 90s we had some good success at the Olympic medal.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You’re the most decorated New Zealand Paralympian on the winter side?

Adam Hall: Uh, no, not yet. We’ve also had a very successful Winter Paralympics ski racing team also in the 90s as well and also in the 80s as well when Paralympic skiing first evolved. We have had quite a successful team over the years, and we try to continue that[?].

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you from the South Island?

Adam Hall: From the South Island.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you ski in Otago?

Adam Hall: Yeah, I am from Otago and I train out of Wanaka.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png After the Summer Olympics, your government had all sorts of budget issues. Has that impacted the Paralympic stuff on the winter side or in general, or is it just the Olympics where they are like “we don’t want to fund everything”?

Adam Hall: I’d much rather stay out of all that political side of things, and I don’t really know much about it…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They are giving you money to ski?

Adam Hall: Based on your results you’re pretty well supported, and you have to obviously show your results to get the kind of resources and help. If you’re successful you’re lucky enough to get world class resources to help you along.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think you’re better resourced than, say, the Americans?

Adam Hall: It’s hard to say what each country gets, but I’m really happy and definitely privileged to have the support that I have behind me.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you going to go to Sochi?

Adam Hall: Definitely, yeah. That what my eyes are set on at the moment and it’s for Sochi in 2014.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Have you qualified points-wise points already?

Adam Hall: Yeah, right now I have the qualifications and [?] points to qualify for the games.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What’s your favourite skiing events?

Adam Hall: Slalom and Super G, and the two combined.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It’s because you like to go fast?

Adam Hall: I like to go fast and I like the technical things as well.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Anything that people should know about disability sport in New Zealand?

Adam Hall: No, not really, the whole disability world, world-wide, is moving in a positive way and continues to when you look back in previous years with people with disabilities were kind of classed as second-hand[?] citizens and it is moving in a positive way and continues to.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Okay, cool. Thank you very much.

Adam Hall at Solitude Station on Copper Mountain
Image: Bidgee.

The competition board following the first run of the slalom earlier today on Copper Mountain on the final day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup. Hall is number 40.
Image: LauraHale.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Wikinews interviews Chilean Paralympic skier Jorge Migueles

Wikinews interviews Chilean Paralympic skier Jorge Migueles

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews Chilean Paralympic skier Jorge Migueles

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with Chilean Paralympic skier Jorge Migueles who was in Copper Mountain, Colorado for the IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png I’m interviewing Jorge Migueles, he is here from Chile. And you’re from Santiago.

Jorge Migueles: Yes, from Santiago.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What you’re what classification?

Jorge Migueles: LW4, I have a prosthetic I ski with, special for skiing, I have an amputation below the knee.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When people think of skiing, they don’t automatically think Chile as a great place for skiers, and developing skiers. How did the skier [Jorge Migueles] from Chile become a skier?

Jorge Migueles: Yes it is a good place because all the big teams — USA, Austria, Canada — go for training there and they go […] in September because the snow is very hard for training, very icy, and it is very close to Santiago, to the airport, it is more easy for the logistics for the team.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I take it that you really like skiing?

Jorge Migueles: Yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you do any other sports?

Jorge Migueles: Yes, I competed in triathlon, but only for a hobby. I got training in Santiago before to come here, to ski[?] here and one, two months in Europe.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So the triathlon helps you with your skiing?

Jorge Migueles: Yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I take it your taking to go to Sochi?

Jorge Migueles: Yeah, I try.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Has your country [Chile] won any Paralympic medals in the winter games?

Jorge Migueles: No, never, neither[?] olympic nor paralympic.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you want to be the first winter Paralympian medal from your country?

Jorge Migueles: I try that. Very difficult.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you get government support for the winter Paralympic side?

Jorge Migueles: Not yet, but I try and get support from the government because in Chile all the sport in the summer in Santiago 2014 is all the sport in the summer is all they reimburse[?], the monies go there, in the winter it’s more difficult. But I try that.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Is winter sport popular in Chile?

Jorge Migueles: Yeah, it’s popular, but it’s very expensive to practice skiing or snowboard.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The only other major news story that people know about in Chile is the earthquake, that didn’t impact you that much you at all?

Jorge Migueles: Yes, a lot, because when […] had to stay here in United States training, and seeing in the news the earthquake, was very hard.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And your family and everything was okay, with that?

Jorge Migueles: Yes, they’re okay.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Is there anything people who know nothing about Paralympic sport in Chile should know?

Jorge Migueles: In London, in the past Olympic Game, one person with disability […], he won gold medal in London. […] He was the first Paralympic to win a medal in the history of Chile. And now the people know this movement [The Paralympics].

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png That’s very cool. Okay. Thank you very, very much.

Jorge Migueles: Thank you.

Jorge Migueles at Solitude Station on Copper Mountain
Image: Bidgee.

Jorge Migueles competing on the last day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup
Image: LauraHale.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 17, 2012

Wikinews interviews Australian disability standing skier Jonty O\’Callaghan

Wikinews interviews Australian disability standing skier Jonty O’Callaghan

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, December 17, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews Australian Paralympic skier Jonty O’Callaghan

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with Australian Paralympic skier Jonty O’Clallaghan who was in Copper Mountain, Colorado for the IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png I’m interviewing Jonty O’Callaghan, one of the Australian skiers with the IPC [International Paralympic Committee] Nor-Am Cup, and you’re a fifteen-year-old?

Jonty O’Callaghan: Yup. Yeah, I’ve been skiing since I was about ten and I really enjoy racing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I talked to your father, he said you’re kind of thinking Sochi?

Jonty O’Callaghan: It’s the matter of if I qualify by getting enough good races and points.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How do you balance skiing with doing school?

Jonty O’Callaghan: Over the past few years in Australia I’ve been doing full time in tenth grade in the Australian winter, which means the school at the mountain brings up my work from my home school in Melbourne to do up at the mountain when I’m not skiing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Since you’re not on the development team, do you get enough support or your parents are supporting this?

Jonty O’Callaghan: Yeah, my parents support me all the way. I’ve never doubted their support always though the journeys and I [thank them] for their support throughout and continuing through my journeys.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What classification are you?

Jonty O’Callaghan: I am LW9-1.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What does that mean for people who know nothing about classification?

Jonty O’Callaghan: I basically have a disability on the right side of my body.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Yep.

Jonty O’Callaghan: which weakens two of my limbs and which means I favor my left side a lot more.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Did you have that from birth?

Jonty O’Callaghan: Yeah, it was caused by premature birth.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you do any other sports anything other than skiing or are you one of those Australian ski bunnies?

Jonty O’Callaghan: I’ve done a lot of sports doing my journey, I’ve always played cricket, Australian football, played a little tennis, and I like golf too as a hobby.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you going to and be one of those dual Paralympians for Winter and Summer?

Jonty O’Callaghan: No, because I don’t think any other sports I like are in the Summer Olympics. I think I’ll pursue them after I finished my skiing career, because cricket you can do when you’re much older.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Is there anything else people should know about you?

Jonty O’Callaghan: Yeah, I’m just looking forward to the future and hoping for the best and maybe some medals.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Okay cool, thank you very much.

Jonty O’Callaghan at Solitude Station on Copper Mountain
Image: Bidgee.

Jonty O’Callaghan at an awards ceremony IPC Nor-Am Cup
Image: LauraHale.

Jonty O’Callaghan competing in the slalom during the last day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup
Image: Bidgee.

Australian Paralympic skier Jonty O’Callaghan in his first run earlier today
Image: LauraHale.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 15, 2012

Wikinews interviews Australian sit skier Victoria Pendergast

Wikinews interviews Australian sit skier Victoria Pendergast

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, December 15, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews Australian Paralympic skier Victoria Pendergast

Yesterday, Wikinews spent time with with Australian Paralympic skier Victoria Pendergast who was in Copper Mountain, Colorado for this week’s IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png I’m interviewing Victoria Pendergast who is an Australian female sit skier on the development team.

Victoria Pendergast: Yer, that’s right.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png How have you been doing here [Copper Mountain] so far?

Victoria Pendergast: Yer, its been alright. Like some races not so good, other races I was pretty happy with the results. We’ve got Winter Park to look forward to, so bit of a warm-up, but, trying to get results.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Before this [skiing] the other sport you’ve done is athletics? You competed at that for the games or was that somebody else?

Victoria Pendergast: No, that was me. I did it for the school, did shot put and did swimming for a bit.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Why would someone switch from athletics to be a crazy mono skier?

Victoria Pendergast: It was a bit of a crazy sort of events kinda went here with my family and then one thing lead to another and like wanted to give sit skiing a go.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Australia doesn’t have many female sit skiers, are you shooting for Sochi?

Victoria Pendergast: It would be nice to get it. It’d be a bit hard to get points to get into it but, you know, if I can get the points to get into Sochi, I’ve got some […].

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Cool. Thank you very much.

Victoria Pendergast at Solitude Station on Copper Mountain
Image: Bidgee.

Victoria Pendergast competing in the Super G during the second day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup
Image: Bidgee.

The competition board following the first run of the slalom earlier the day of the interview on Copper Mountain on the final day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup. Victoria is number 26.
Image: LauraHale.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Wikinews interviews Australian sit skier Lincoln Budge

Wikinews interviews Australian sit skier Lincoln Budge

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, December 15, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews Australian Paralympic skier Lincoln Budge

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with Australian Paralympic skier Lincoln Budge who was in Copper Mountain, Colorado for this week’s IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png I’m interviewing Lincoln Budge, one of Australia’s development team skiers, who is here at the IPC [International Paralympic Committee] Nor-Am Cup and you’re not skiing today?

Lincoln Budge: Well I skied first run.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Ooh, a DNF [Did not finish].

Lincoln Budge: DNF, so nothing else for the rest of the afternoon now.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So how have you preformed in the past days?

Lincoln Budge: I’ve done pretty well in the previous days. I’ve finished every race till now which has been good, I’ve improved my points on what I’ve had previously, so I’m progressing slowly and, yeah, it’s good.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What classification are you?

Lincoln Budge: LW11.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you shooting for Sochi or are you just kind of developing now with the idea of the next one [Winter Paralympics] in 2018?

Lincoln Budge: I’d like to go to Sochi, but realistically it’s probably not going to happen, I’ve only been skiing for three years, so. Yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And you’re from some town that’s really hard to pronounce in Australia.

Lincoln Budge: Yes, Yackandandah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What state is this in?

Lincoln Budge: Victoria, north east Victoria

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So Victoria is the state that produces all the great Australian skiers?

Lincoln Budge: Correct, Victoria is the state to be in.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How long have you been in the development team?

Lincoln Budge: Been skiing for almost three years now.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png On the development team or just period?

Lincoln Budge: Period but I pretty much got onto the development team […] days in[?], so all my skiing has been with the team.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You never considered doing the nordic skiing?

Lincoln Budge: No way. [laughs] That’s way too much dedication.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Where do you like to ski and which, like Super G, Slalom, is your favourite?

Lincoln Budge: Down hill would be the one I’ve enjoyed most so far. It’s fast, obviously, a speed event, and the whole build-up to it, ‘s really fun and I enjoy the speed events.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Where do you like to ski? Are you one of these people likes to come to the US, or do you think Victoria’s got the best ski fields in the world?

Lincoln Budge: US is pretty good, I’ve sort of skied quite a few hills. I’ve based somewhere different each year so far. […] I don’t really have a preferred one.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Considering how expensive skiing is, do you think you’re getting adequate support from everyone to enable you to continue your ski career?

Lincoln Budge: Yeah, at the moment I’m getting good support from the team and everyone, which is really good and hopefully financially I can keep doing it into the future.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png As someone watching skiing: can you throw your monoski over your shoulder and transport it that way?

Lincoln Budge: I can if I want to but I’ve got a set of wheels that I clip the rig into so I can push it around more easily than putting it on me shoulder. I cart skis[?] around on my shoulder, but I’ve got a set of wheels, just to make it easier.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Ok, thank you very very much.

Lincoln Budge at Solitude Station on Copper Mountain
Image: Bidgee.

Lincoln Budge competing in the Super G during the first day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup
Image: Bidgee.

Lincoln Budge competing in the Super G during the second day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup
Image: Bidgee.

Lincoln Budge competing in the slalom during the first day of the IPC Nor-Am Cup
Image: LauraHale.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 14, 2012

Wikinews interviews Australian Paralympic skiers Toby Kane, Cameron Rahles Rahbula, and Mitchell Gourley

Wikinews interviews Australian Paralympic skiers Toby Kane, Cameron Rahles Rahbula, and Mitchell Gourley

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, December 14, 2012

Recently, Wikinews sat down with Australian standing Paralympic skiers Toby Kane, Cameron Rahles-Rahbula, and Mitchell Gourley who were in Vail, Colorado for a training camp for the start of this week’s IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Wikinews reporters LauraHale and Hawkeye7 interview Australian Paralympic skiers Cameron Rahles Rahbula, Mitchell Gourley, and Toby Kane

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png I’m interviewing Cameron [Rahles-Rahbula] with a hyphenated last name, Mitchell Gourley, [and] Toby Kane. And they’re in Copper Mountain to compete with the IPC NorAm cup.

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Yes.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you guys can qualify for Sochi?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Not this race, but yeah…
Toby Kane: Any races that we kind of do, I think we can qualify, but technically, for the APC it would have to be a world cup first to qualify.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Where’s the world cups?

Toby Kane: We have one this year in Italy, in Sestriere, and one in St Moritz, in Switzerland
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: and one in Slovenia, in Maribor, and Russia
Mitchell Gourley: world championships in La Molina in Spain as well, and Russia, the test event is another world cup in Sochi.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You guys are all skiers, right?

all (in unison): Yes.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png None of you, when they said “we’re doing snowboarding“, said “I want to jump ship and do snowboarding”?

Toby Kane: No.
Mitchell Gourley: No.
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: No.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You all love the skiing. Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png (to Cameron Rahles-Rahbula): What did you do to your chin [which is taped up]?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: I had a crash last week, and I split my chin open. I kneed myself here, so I had stitches.
Toby Kane: Thirteen stitches.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Crashed skiing right?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Yeah.
Toby Kane: Our physio probably took out five last night.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png As somebody who knows very little about Paralympic skiing, I have a question having watched it. There seems to be three types skiiers: the ones who are in the monochairs, the ones who are blind, and the ones with amputations and the ones without arms. I’ve had this debate. Who’s the craziest amongst you? The ones who can’t see, the ones with no arms, or the ones on a mono-ski?

Mitchell Gourley: The completely blind people are a little nuts.
Toby Kane: A B1 is, blacked out goggles…
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: … who just follows the sound of their guides. So they’re probably, when it comes to speed events, in terms of fear level, that’s pretty intense.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Not having arms, you don’t think, would be scarier?

Mitchell Gourley: No.
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Yeah, but you can see where you are going. When you have to trust the other person in front of you…
Toby Kane: .. you have to be fairly crazy to do downhill in sit skis.
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Those guys, they start crashing, or they have a mistake, they can’t recover in the same way a stand up can, so even though those classes aren’t going as quickly, probably stand ups in general have a bit more control, and to recover.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Can you go and tell me your classifications?

Toby Kane: Yeah, we all ski in the standing class. LW6/8-2

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Like L1…

Mitchell Gourley: These guys are both LW2s because they’ve both got on leg.
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: So we ski with just one leg, with crutches, whereas you’ve got people who’ve got below-knee amputations, they may have a longer stump and they ski with a prosthetic leg. Toby and I have got to legally ski on one ski.
Toby Kane: And what you were referring to before was the three classes of alpine skiing is standing, sitting, and blind.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you’ve all been to Paralympics before?

Toby Kane: Cam’s been to three, I’ve been to two, and Mitch has been to one.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And what was your favorite one? Do you have one?

Mitchell Gourley: Vancouver. (laughter)
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Vancouver it would have been.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Because you love Canadians?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: It’s also, obviously, skiing comes down to results. So, I loved Salt Lake City. I was there for experience, that was great. My second one, I had bit of a disaster Paralympics. I didn’t ski too well. Sestriere in 2006. The last one, I was able to come away with a couple of medals, so it was… I enjoyed that obviously. They all had different aspects.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How did the ski slopes compare?

Toby Kane: Vancouver, they’re good slopes.
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Salt Lake City, was a little bit flatter. Probably the type of hill… it was still good, it was my first games, I enjoyed it. Yeah, they usually prepare the courses reasonably well, ’cause they’ve got a lot of course workers on the slopes. That has a big influence on condition, not just the actual hill itself. Vancouver was a challenge in the sense that we had terrible weather, terrible conditions and snow, even though it’s a good hill, whereas I think Sestriere we had sunshine virtually every day. So a lot of it comes down to weather as well as the hill, the time of year.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png In Australia, the big visibility Paralympics are the summer. Do you guys ever feel vaguely — I know it’s the wrong question to ask — but do you ever feel vaguely cheated because you’re doing neglected, you don’t get the attention, the ABC‘s like “nah, we don’t want to cover you”?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: umm…
Toby Kane: Give us the official answer? (laughter, interjections from elsewhere in the room)
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Australia being a summer sport [country], we’re aware that there’s going to be more focus on the summer games and particularly because there’s a larger… there’s more athletes, there more events, there more medals. There will always be more coverage for the summer games. There’s no winter athlete that could walk away with more than five gold medals. There’s not enough events for that. Whereas I think you can get a swimmer who might get eight gold medals. So, it’s a different sort of exposure.
Mitchell Gourley: And realistically, it’s pretty unlikely for anybody in winter sport no matter how good they are, to walk away with more than one or two, just because of the nature of the sport, which is that anyone can crash. You can be a great skier all the year and then crash. [uncertain] can tell you about that in Vancouver. It’s a pretty unpredictable sport.
Toby Kane: The way that our sport moved after Salt Lake City is that instead of Cam and I skiing against each other, and only people with one leg, to being really competitive across those three classes, means that we think that the winter games are really, really competitive. Quite difficult to win a medal. I think, if you took Michael Milton as an example, he won four gold at Salt Lake out of four events. He won one silver in Torino out of four events with the new system, and he compared both events to be equal. So, yeah, I think you’ve got to look at the value of the medals at the winter games now has been quite high.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you guys like the new point system they implemented?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: There’s always challenges, because you’ve got different classes, and varied conditions, so they try and adapt the times to fit, but it’ll never be something that can be always right, because we’ve got a sport that’s got different conditions, and different locations, as opposed to a swimming pool, where you know you’ve got fifty metres. So that’s something that’ll always be a challenge, but in saying that, it has raised the bar, in terms of the standard of skiing, which is good. From an Australian perspective, not necessarily the public will be aware of that but I think from an international perspective, the skiing has moved into a more professional area, which is good, and I think that it will be the best thing for the sport moving forward.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Evan O’Hanlon at the summer games was talking about the disparity problem between able bodied athletes and athletes with disabilities in terms of sponsorship. You guys have no visibility, is that something that you guys sit there going “we should have the same sponsorship as the great Australian skiers”?

Mitchell Gourley: The problem in that is that in our sport we would probably be the most visible alpine skiers from Australia. The able bodied alpine team is pretty average and has been for a few years now, since a couple of guys retired after Vancouver. So we’re probably, while its still very small, it’s a lot less than the summer guys, even the summer Paralympics guys, were are more visible than the Australian alpine team.
Toby Kane: I think a few of us, well Cam and I and I think Mitch is along the same lines, is that we’re not here for a career as an athlete. so I know I haven’t actively a lot of sponsorships. I have a life away from skiing with what I’m doing at the university and I’m here because I really love to do it, and I love to compete, but I’m not overly fussed about the public recognition of it all. I’m more concerned with skiing with our able-bodied counterparts and showing them what we can do.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you guys get equal treatment? Your share of the same facilities, same trainers, that sort of stuff?

Toby Kane: We train on the same hills.
Mitchell Gourley: And last week we had pretty much the same races as the able-bodied had the week before on the same hills, and what they ski on next week, and we follow on that, so we don’t have to start. But with a hundred of… that’s why I’m a level below world cup for able-bodied skiers, and skiing on the same hill, and running pretty comparable times, and getting a lot of comments from coaches and athletes there. And yeah that’s what we all, I think, strive for. It’s an awkward thing to ever try and illustrate it to the Australian public, ski racing, and let alone Paralympic ski racing, and what we’re doing. So […] we’ve got to accept that we’re not going to get the recognition publicly probably that we may or may not deserve, and we more look towards our peers, whether they’re able bodied or disabled, and if they respect us, if the best able bodied skiers in the world respect what we are doing, and think that we are doing it bloody well, then we can hold our head high and feel really good. Had one of the best slalom skiers in the world walk up to me a few years ago when we were in training, and say “that’s some of the best slalom skiing that I’ve ever seen, wow that’s incredible. One-legged. I couldn’t do that on one leg”. That kind of thing. So that obviously makes us all feel like we’re doing something that while the recognition might not be there from the public, that we feel as though we are doing a really competitive and really difficult sport, and doing it to a really high level.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You mentioned Australia being like a country of summer sports. What attracted you to winter sport in the first place?

Mitchell Gourley: I think it’s a better sport. (laughter)
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Australians, considering we don’t have many hills, Australians do love skiing, those that do it. It’s a unique sport in the sense that you get to travel at high speeds, on different mountains all over the world, under your own power, going down a hill at 130 or something k’s an hour, that sort of thing. You don’t get… to me, running up and down a track, or…
Toby Kane: I think to me it’s a fun sport. There aren’t that many sports that people, a lot of people, spend heaps of their own money to go and do, as a pastime. As something that they want to do on the holidays and with their family and all that kind of stuff. It’s kind of cool that that’s what we do. Like, lots of people would spend a sh-tload of money to go skiing, and that’s our sport. Not many people would pay a heap of money to stare at a black line in a pool, or to run around a track against the clock.
Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: Yeah, we love it, and that’s why I’ve done it for so many years, because I love the sport. I mean, racing’s one thing but if I didn’t enjoy skiing I wouldn’t be here and there’s not a day when… I mean you have cold days and weather and stuff, but you don’t… for us to get out and get on the hill isn’t a burden I don’t think in the same way as other sports can be.
Toby Kane: I think the change for me — I think I can speak for Cam as well, ’cause he’s been around for a while — the change between racing in so many classes to racing in so few probably kept us around, I think. It made it a lot more competitive; it made it a lot more of a challenge, that previously it wouldn’t have been, and I think if we took an LW2 class right now we’d be getting similar results to what Michael got in Salt Lake City, so, the fact that it did get a lot more competitive is probably why I’ve been here for so long, in the challenge to keep competing and keep improving and keep performing at the highest level.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are there any skiers that you’re looking forward to racing against this week coming up?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: This week I think Australia has a pretty good, strong team from a standing perspective, so we’re probably racing against each other.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you do not care about the Chileans, or whoever, hanging around?

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: The Canadian and American teams are here, and they’ve got some developing athletes. Probably more the Europeans who are developing who’ve got the highest others skiing in our particular division, and the Americans are very strong with their sit skiers. So this week being just a North American-based race we’ll probably be looking at the other two in terms of racing, but yeah, when we get over to the world cups over in Europe in January, that’s when the whole field’s together, and gives us some idea of what we’re racing against.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I feel like we’re almost coming to a close. What do you do outside of skiing? You had some life you said.

Cameron Rahles-Rahbula: I work as a physiotherapist, and I am a family man. Since Vancouver I haven’t skied a huge amount since then. I’ve got a little boy, and so other priorities definitely start to take effect. I think as a skier, it’s a challenge from the travelling perspective when you do have family. I think that’s unlike a lot of summer athletes who have their training base next door. For us, we need to be always on the move, so that’s always one of the challenges with alpine skiing. You get the privilege of travelling but you’re away from your family, so for me, my last year I have focused more on family life and sort of getting back into the skiing this year.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What do you do Mitchell?

Mitchell Gourley: I’m still studying. I’m a bit younger than these guys so I’m…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Which university?

Mitchell Gourley: I’m at Melbourne University studying. So I’ve got pretty much a year to go now, but that’ll take me two years to do just because of where Sochi is, in March 2014 I’ll cut back this year coming, 2013, and I’ll only do probably about half — I’ll do five subjects as opposed to eight, just because when you’re out travelling during the year and prepping, using your weekend to ski will it getting to you like that. With the schedule, from June to the end September will be pretty much flat skiing. Last time I did that leading into Vancouver, I mean I do that every year but probably a bigger load in the games lead that kind of thing. And I did that in the middle of Year 12 last time, and that was interesting, but now I can actually…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You finished your VCEs then?

Mitchell Gourley: I finished that during the…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And you did well?

Mitchell Gourley: Yeah, I was happy with how I went, so that was good of me. I moved schools to pursue what I was doing with skiing, to an international school that really helped structure things around me with my environment, and I sort of cut back on subjects and things but managed to make it work those times, but yeah. For me, it’s university for a couple of years, or for a year and a half or so to knock that over. So then I have to think about getting a real job and that’s a scary thought, a real job, or eventually doing further study, based on the Melbourne model, being what it is now that you can’t usually do much with your first degree. (laughter)

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And Toby, what are..?

Toby Kane: I’m halfway through postgraduate medicine, so I am just trying to balance that and getting in to Russia. And Russia will be my third games, and most probably my last. And then it’ll be the start of my fourth year of medicine so, yeah, I’m a bit like Cam, I’ve skied probably less over the last two years since Vancouver, just with uni and I’m kind of looking forward to putting everything that I’ve got left in me into skiing until Russia.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Thank you very, very much. It was much appreciated. Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Look forward to seeing you guys in Russia!



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Wikinews interviews Australian disability standing skier Jonty O\’Clallaghan

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, December 14, 2012

Wikinews reporter LauraHale interviews Australian Paralympic skier Jonty O’Clallaghan

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with Australian Paralympic skier Jonty O’Clallaghan who was in Copper Mountain, Colorado for this week’s IPC Nor-Am Cup.

Australian Paralympic skier Jonty O’Clallaghan in his first run earlier today
Image: LauraHale.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress