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February 28, 2013

Austria wins friendly team competition at end of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

Austria wins friendly team competition at end of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

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Thursday, February 28, 2013

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The IPC Alpine World Championships wrapped up yesterday in La Molina, Spain with a friendly, non-medal counting team event won by Austria. The winner was tabulated based on the fastest score for a visually impaired skier on the team, a female skier on the team, and a male skier on the team. The Austrian team included Markus Salcher, Roman Rabl, and Claudia Loesch for times counted, with Philipp Bonadimann, Thomas Grochar, and Martin Wuerz also competing. The team event included ten teams representing eight countries, with the United States and Canada having two teams each and 54 skiers competing.

The United States team 1 came in second with Tyler Walker, Mark Bathum, and Alana Nichols times counting, and Heath Calhoun, Ralph Green, and Allison Jones also belonging to the team. Russia came in third with Ivan Frantseva, Alexandr Alyabyev, and Mariya Papulova having their scores counted. Hosts Spain finished last with Jon Santacana, Óscar Espallargas, and Úrsula Pueyo having their times counting, and Gabriel Gorce and Nathalie Carpanedo also members of the Spanish team.

The next major competition ahead of the 2014 Winter Paralympics is the test event in Sochi, Russia in March of this year.

Thomas Grochar on his run
Image: Laura Hale.

Solene Jambaque of France on her run
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet, five IPC Alpine World Championships gold medal winning skiing, on her run
Image: Laura Hale.

Canadian visually impaired skier Viviane Forest and Chloe and her guide Lauzon-Gauthier on their run
Image: Laura Hale.

Austrian skier Roman Rabl
Image: Laura Hale.

Gabriel Gorce and his guide on their run for Spain
Image: Laura Hale.

Visually impaired Canadian skier Mac Marcoux and guide BJ Marcoux experience problems on their run
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor skis for Team USA 2
Image: Laura Hale.

Martin France skis for Slovakia
Image: Laura Hale.

Jon Santacana and Miguel Galindo ski for Spain
Image: Laura Hale.

Braydon Luscombe of Canada
Image: Laura Hale.

Allison Jones of the United States for Team USA 1
Image: Laura Hale.

Fredric Francois of France
Image: Laura Hale.



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This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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Austria wins friendly team competition at the end of the IPC Alpine World Championships

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, February 28, 2013

The IPC Alpine World Championships wrapped up yesterday in La Molina, Spain with a friendly, non-medal counting team event won by Austria. The winner was tabulated based on the fastest score for a visually impaired skier on the team, a female skier on the team and a male skier on the team. The Austrian team included Markus Salchet, Roman Rabl and Claudia Loesch for times counted, with Philipp Bonadimann, Thomas Grochar and Martin Wuerz also competing. The team event included ten teams representing eight countries, with the United States and Canada having two teams each and 54 skiers competing.

The United States team 1 came in second with Tayler Walker, Markus Bathum and Alana Nichols times counting, and Heath Calhoun, Ralph Green and Allison Jones also belonging to the team. Russia came in second with Ivan Frantseva, Alexandr Alyabyev and Mariya Papulova having their scores counted. Hosts Spain finished last with Jon Santacana, Óscar Espallargas and Úrsula Pueyo having their times counting, and Gabriel Gorce and Nathalie Carpanedo also members of the Spanish team.

The next major competition ahead of the 2014 Winter Paralympics is the test event in Sochi, Russia in March of this year.

Thomas Grochar on his run
Image: Laura Hale.

Solene Jambaque of France on her run
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet, five IPC Alpine World Championships gold medal winning skiing, on her run
Image: Laura Hale.

Canadian visually impaired skier Viviane Forest and Chloe and her guide Lauzon-Gauthier on their run
Image: Laura Hale.

Austrian skier Roman Rabl
Image: Laura Hale.

Gabriel Gorce and his guide on their run for Spain
Image: Laura Hale.

Visually impaired Canadian skier Mac Marcoux and guide BJ Marcoux experience problems on their run
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor skis for Team USA 2
Image: Laura Hale.

Martin France skis for Slovakia
Image: Laura Hale.

Jon Santacana and Miguel Galindo ski for Spain
Image: Laura Hale.

Braydon Luscombe of Canada
Image: Laura Hale.

Allison Jones of the United States for Team USA 1
Image: Laura Hale.

Fredric Francois of France
Image: Laura Hale.



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Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 26, 2013

Wikinews interviews Irene Villa

Wikinews interviews Irene Villa – Wikinews, the free news source

Wikinews interviews Irene Villa

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Irene Villa after the interview with the Wikinews reporters.
Image: Raystorm.

Yesterday evening in La Molina, Spain, Wikinews sat down and talked with Irene Villa to discuss para-alpine skiing, disability sport, women’s sport, and her own sporting career. Villa was in town as part of activities taking place around the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships, where one of her skiing club teammates is competing as a member of the Spanish team. Her high profile in Spain has brought additional interest to para-alpine skiing and disability sport in general.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png: Hi we are interviewing Irene Villa, who is a disability skier from Spain and professional author, social figure, journalist, and psychologist. You are most well known for being a terrorist survivor, but you’re here because of the [2013 Alpine Skiing] World Championships.((es))

Irene Villa: I’m here because I love sitting ski, I practice and I compete, but since I got pregnant and my son was born I stopped competing. But before I had my son I competed against the people who will run tomorrow, the Germans who win, and I wanted to be here. I haven’t raced in the World Cup, but I did race in the European Cup. And well, I’m also here to support paralympic sports.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: In 2009 you said you were trying to make the 2010 Winter Paralympics. After giving birth are you going to continue with the sport and hope to make 2018?((es))

Irene Villa: I would love to. The thing is that you need a certain amount of IPCAS points. I’m now competing, on top of that I have an injury, tomorrow and the next day I will be training, and I don’t know if I’ll have enough time to make it. Sochi [Winter Paralympic Games of 2014] is right around the corner, next year, so it depends on how many point you’ve got. 2018? For sure.((es))

Listen to the interview.
Audio: Laura Hale.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: You compete in a lot of national competitions, and with disability sport in general, classification is a big issue. Competing in national competitions, does classification come into play, especially when there is so few women skiers in your group?((es))

Irene Villa: Yes, certainly. You see, I have an advantage because I have buttocks, I have abs. I have an advantage over a teammate who has a spinal injury here [points to the high part of the back] and also competes. So of course classification is very important because we cannot have an advantage. I believe in competing in equal fairness, and disabilities vary so much that you need a good classification. Issues because of classification? Well, I think we are pretty well classified. For example, my fingers [shows hand where she lost three fingers] are not taken into account in classification, there’s always going to be a small detail that they don’t count. This is a disadvantage when holding the outrigger, and yet I’m classified like someone who is missing half a leg, for example. I’m missing both legs and three fingers. But, it’s really complicated to finetune it… Because then we would need to have twenty thousand classifications. This is what we have.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Some of the skiers I’ve talked to in the mens’ side, not in Spain, but from other countries, have complained about the quality of womens’ skiing, and that there’s not enough high quality competition. That’s why I was interested in if classification was impacting women’s skiing because there is so few women skiers, that classes seem they’d make it harder to find competitors in classes that are making the sport equitable and fair.((es))

Irene Villa: Of course. In the case of the women, it is really hard to get a woman skiing, to have her compete in sit-ski. In fact, in Spain we exist thanks to Fundación También, which insisted in there being a female category. There was no female category, no women who dared. And we’re the same who started out in 2007. There has been no new blood because women don’t dare, because it is a tough sport, that requires sponsors —that do not exist—, or your own money, and it also demands courage and withstanding bad moments. I’ve suffered cold and injuries, and had some really tough times. You take away the best with you, but it is very hard, and men resist the cold better.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Your personal experiences have adequately prepared you to hurl yourself down the mountain at high speed? ((es))

Irene Villa: At the beginning, it was very scary. The first times were very hard: falls, injuries… I even dislocated my vertebra and got a prothesis for the neck because of a hernia, one teammate broke her clavicle, another her femur… It has a lot of risks, but the truth is, speed hooks you! Once you learn to plant the ski pole, angle yourself, learn the position you must use, which is like a motorcycle rider’s, once you see you can run a lot and not fall, speed is addictive and you want to go faster.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Most of the ski team looks like they come from the Madrid area? From the Fundación También?((es))

Irene Villa: In my team we are from everywhere in Spain. Even Nathalie Carpanedo is from France.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: How does a Frenchwoman become a Spanish skier?((es))

Irene Villa: Because she lives in Madrid. She has the Spanish nationality. Then we have another woman from the South of Spain, in Andalusia, from Tarragona in Catalonia, from Galicia… We are from all parts of Spain.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: So there’s a national ski culture. People think of Spain as a place with beaches and no snow.((es))

Irene Villa: There’s not too much tradition of paralympic skiing, to be true. There’s less. But we do have Sierra Nevada and the Pyrenees.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: The Paralympics in Spain are supported by the Plan ADO Paralímpico. Do they provide enough support to women and to winter sports in general?((es))

Irene Villa: The people in the national squad, like Úrsula Pueyo, would know that. If Plan ADO helps someone, it’s the people in the national team, those who dedicate their lives to the sport. They offered it to me when I was at my peak, in 2010, when I won my first gold medals and wasn’t yet married. They offered me to move to Baqueira, where Úrsula lives, with Nathalie, and with a Catalan girl too, but I declined, because when you have a life, a daily job, events, conferences, travels…. you can’t leave it all for the sport. But I think the Plan does help the people who dedicate themselves to the sport, like Úrsula.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: When I’ve read about disability skiing in Spain for women, they talk about you and they talk about Teresa Silva. Is there a way to get more attention for women skiers on that level, outside of using you and Teresa Silva as a vehicle? Not that you are not great for drawing attention! But how do you draw more attention to women’s sports and high quality that women are capable of doing?((es))

Irene Villa: Oh, I would like that more people would join this sport or any other disability sport, that they practised it. And what we do is try to encourage them through the media, interviews, conferences… Teresa is the director of Fundación También, and she has access to talk with many people. As a speaker in motivation conferences and the like, I make people aware of it too. But it is difficult, because people try it out and love it, but will not race. Because racing is very risky and, well, you saw the slopes yesterday, sometimes they are hard, like a wall, and falling can be awful. But when we get the chance, we promote the sport and try to attract people that way, encouraging them to join this adventure that is sport.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: As an outsider from, not Spain, I know you are a political figure. Has that gotten in the way of your ability to be a sportswoman? ((es))

Irene Villa: No… Besides, that part about me being a political figure… I have nothing to do with politics. I don’t know why people always… Why? Because of what happened to me. I was a kid. A 12 year old has nothing to do with politics. We know too that ETA has attacked people who had nothing to do with politics as well. My mother was a police director. What may have interfered is the fact that since I was a known figure I’ve tried that other people…. Let’s see, for example I started doing sport so other people would know you could do sport. So it is true that the fact of being known has pushed me to do more things that I would’ve probably not have done. Because I wanted to show people that you could ski. And I ended up hooked. I only did it for a tv reportage. “Okay okay, a reportage and let’s have people know that yes, we can”. In fact, my book is titled “Knowing that you can” [Saber que se puede, in Spanish]. Later I got hooked. But the fact of being known motivates you to show other people a path that could be very beneficial to them, and at the end you get addicted to it.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: When all is said and done, what do you kind of want your legacy to be? Do you want to be known as Irene Villa, disability sport advocate figure? Do you want to be known like Jon Santacana, or do you want to be known as somebody who has pushed the boundaries in other areas? ((es))

Irene Villa: As something more. I’d like my testimony to go beyond sport, which is what I try to do around the world, besides telling people you can do it. It’s about the capacity of a person to make herself, to be happy, to overcome resentment, to love herself, and to love others. I think that is the most important thing. And that’s the basis. I think sport is something that completes your life, mentally and physically. It’s very important. But my message is forgiveness, happiness and hope.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Thank you very much!((es))



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France finishes 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships on top of medal ladder

France finishes 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships on top of medal ladder

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

On the final day of individual competition at the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain, concluded today with the Giant Slalom, France pulled ahead of Austria to sit atop of the medal ladder with seven gold medals, two silver medals, and three bronze medals to Austria’s seven gold medals, one silver medal, and three bronze medals. Canada earned the most overall medals at the World Championships with fourteen total medals, two more than France.

France’s medals today included a gold by Marie Bochet in the women’s standing event. Bochet captured all five individual gold medals available in her group at these World Championships. Vincent Gauthier-Manuel also earned a gold for France, in the men’s standing group.

Claudia Loesch earned a gold for Austria in the women’s sitting group. It was Austria’s only medal on the day.

Canada’s medals today included a silver by Viviane Forest and her guide Chloe Lauzon-Gauthier in the women’s visually impaired group, a silver by Mac Marcoux and his guide BJ Marcoux in the men’s visually impaired, a bronze by Chris Williamson and his guide in the same group, a bronze by Kimberly Joines in the women’s sitting group, and a bronze by Alexandra Starker in the women’s standing group.

Spain, who had not earned a medal since the second day of competition, increased their medal count by one when Jon Santacana and his guide Miguel Galindo Garcés earned their third gold of the competition after two competitions in a row where they earned Did Not Finishes (DNF) during their second runs.

The final day of skiing saw 117 skiers start, with only 72 getting ranked at the end. 28 skiers earned DNFs during the first run, and nine earned DNFs during their second runs. Five did not start the first run, and one did not start their second run. Two skiers were disqualified in their second runs.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of France.png FRA 7 2 3 12
2 Flag of Austria.png AUT 7 1 3 11
3 Flag of Russia.png RUS 4 4 3 11
4 Flag of Japan (geometric).png JPN 3 3 1 7
5 Flag of Spain.svg ESP 3 0 0 3
6 Flag of Germany.svg GER 2 7 2 11
7 Flag of Slovakia.png SVK 2 2 1 5
8 Flag of Canada.png CAN 1 5 8 14
9 Flag of the United States.png USA 1 1 1 3
10 Flag of Switzerland.svg SUI 0 2 4 6
11 Flag of Great Britain with border.png GBR 0 2 3 5
12 Flag of Italy.png ITA 0 1 0 1
13 Flag of New Zealand.png NZL 0 0 1 1

Viviane Forest and Chloe Lauzon-Gauthier of Canada hug following their silver medal run in the Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Alexandra Frantseva and Pavel Zabotini of Russia hug following their gold medal run in the women’s visually impaired Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Kelly Gallagher and Charlotte Evans of Great Britain make their way down the course in their second run of their bronze medal winning performance in the Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Jon Santacana and Miguel Galindo Garcés embrace Chris Williamson and his guide Robin Femy following Santacana’s gold medal winning run
Image: Laura Hale.

Santacana and Galindo at the end of their second run in the Giant Slalom
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet of France gets a hug following earning her fifth medal of the competition
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet after crossing the finish line
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet and German silver medalist Andrea Rothfuss embrace
Image: Laura Hale.



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Austria regains medal leadboard after fourth competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

Austria regains medal leadboard after fourth competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Philipp Bonadimann of Austria at the end of his first run in the Super Combined event
Image: Laura Hale.

Yesterday, following the Super Combined event at the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships, Austria took the lead again in the medal count having earned six total gold medals across four days of competition. France is tied with Austria in the overall medal count.

Austria’s medal tally yesterday included a gold by LW11 classified Claudia Loesch in the women’s sitting event, a gold by LW4 classified Matthias Lanzinger in the men’s standing event, and a bronze by LW11 classified Philipp Bonadimann in the men’s sitting event.

Following her gold medal winning, Loesch told the media she was super happy she won, and she had a really good slalom run. She went on to say she usually finishes in second and this was a surprise for her.

France’s medal count increased with a gold by LW6/8-2 Marie Bochet in the women’s standing, and a bronze by LW4 classified Cedric Amafroi-Broisat in the men’s standing.

Spain’s vision impaired skier Jon Santacana, who won Spain’s only two medals in the competition, failed to finish his second run in the Super Combined. Following the race, he was visibly upset. He had finished the first run in first place by a tenth of a second ahead of eventual gold medalist Chris Williamson and guide Robin Femy of Canada. Williamson hugged silver medalist Miroslav Haraus of Slovakia, and Santacana when Santacana and guide Miguel Galindo Garcés returned to the finishing area after Santacana’s fall. Spain’s other entrant in the men’s visually impaired Super Combined event, Gabriel Gorce and guide Arnau Ferrer, finished three thousandths of a second out of medal contention with a combined run time of 1:47.93. The bronze medalist, Ivan Frantseva and guide German Agranovskii‎ of Russia, had a combined run time of 1:47.90.

At the finish of each competitor’s second run, most are requested to go to doping control to insure they are not taking any banned substance. The 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships are scheduled to continue today.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of Austria.png AUT 6 1 3 10
2 Flag of France.png FRA 5 2 3 10
3 Flag of Russia.png RUS 3 3 3 9
4 Flag of Germany.svg GER 2 5 2 9
5 Flag of Slovakia.png SVK 2 2 1 5
5 Flag of Japan (geometric).png JPN 2 2 1 5
7 Flag of Spain.svg ESP 2 0 0 2
8 Flag of Canada.png CAN 1 3 5 9
9 Flag of the United States.png USA 1 1 1 3
10 Flag of Switzerland.svg SUI 0 2 2 4
10 Flag of Great Britain with border.png GBR 0 2 2 4
12 Flag of Italy.png ITA 0 1 0 1
13 Flag of New Zealand.png NZL 0 0 1 1



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February 25, 2013

France leads medal count after third competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

France leads medal count after third competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

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Monday, February 25, 2013

Marie Bochet following her first slalom run
Image: Raystorm.

Vincent Gauthier-Manuel on the course in his first slalom run
Image: Laura Hale.

Yesterday in La Molina, Spain on the third day of competition at the IPC Alpine World Championships, slalom gold medal winning French skiers Marie Bochet and Vincent Gauthier-Manuel assisted in putting France in the medal count lead. This brought the total number medals won by French skiers to eight.

New Zealand, with only two skiers competing, earned its first medal of the competition when Adam Hall won a bronze in yesterday’s slalom event. His teammate Corey Peters finished his first run in the slalom but notched a Did Not Finish (DNF) for his second run and did not rank.

Spain moved down the medal table after their medal favorite, Jon Santacana and guide Miguel Galindo Garcés, failed to finish his second run in the slalom. Other Spanish skiers also failed to perform yesterday with wildcard entry women’s sit-skier Nathalie Carpanedo and men’s sit-skier Óscar Espallargas earning a DNF during their first runs on a day that saw thirty-six skiers earn DNFs on their initial run down the course. Men’s visually impaired skier Gabriel Gorce and guide Arnau Ferrer were disqualified in the first run for missing gate 61. Standing LW2 classified skier Úrsula Pueyo finished ninth and last in her group.

Yesterday was originally scheduled to be a day off for skiers, but the slalom event was cancelled Saturday due to poor conditions. Today is scheduled to be the Super Combined event.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of France.png FRA 4 2 2 8
2 Flag of Austria.png AUT 4 1 2 7
3 Flag of Germany.svg GER 2 4 1 7
4 Flag of Russia.png RUS 2 2 2 6
5 Flag of Slovakia.png SVK 2 1 0 3
6 Flag of Spain.svg ESP 2 0 0 2
7 Flag of the United States.png USA 1 1 1 3
7 Flag of Japan (geometric).png JPN 1 1 1 3
9 Flag of Canada.png CAN 0 2 4 6
10 Flag of Switzerland.svg SUI 0 2 2 4
11 Flag of Great Britain with border.png GBR 0 1 2 3
12 Flag of Italy.png ITA 0 1 0 1
13 Flag of New Zealand.png NZL 0 0 1 1



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February 24, 2013

Team USA delivers going into third day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

Team USA delivers going into third day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

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Sunday, February 24, 2013

Going into the third scheduled day of competition at the IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain yesterday, the United States para-alpine team has delivered with a gold medal won by Laurie Stephens in the women’s sitting downhill, a silver medal won by men’s sit skier Stephen Lawler in the downhill, and bronze medal won by Laurie Stephens in the women’s sitting Super-G. The United States finished two days of competition fifth overall in the medal count, tied with Russia.

Other Team USA performances in the downhill included a fourth place finish by visually impaired woman skier Danelle Umstead and guide Robert Umstead, a fifth place finish by Christopher Devlin-Young in the men’s sitting group, an eighth place finish by Ralph Green in the men’s standing group, an eighth place finish by women’s standing skier Allison Jones, a ninth place finish by visually impaired Mark Bathum and guide Sean Ramsden, a tenth place finish by Tyler Walker in the men’s sitting, and a thirteenth place finish by Heath Calhoun in the men’s sitting.

In the Super-G event on Thursday, Jones finished fourth in the women’s standing group, Devlin-Young finished fifth, Stephani Victor finished fourth in the women’s sitting group, Umstead and Umstead finished fifth in their group, Bathum and Ramsden finished seventh in their group, Walker finished twelfth in his group, Green finished sixteenth in the men’s standing, Jonathan Lujan finished nineteenth in the men’s standing, Stephen Lawler finished twentieth in the men’s sitting, Heath Calhoun finished twenty-third in men’s sitting, and Andrew Earl Kurka finished twenty-fifth in the men’s sitting group.

A few members of Team USA had difficulties, and were not able to start or finish their races. In the men’s sitting downhill, Kurka did not finish. In the downhill and Super-G event, 2010 Winter Paralympics medalist Alana Nichols did not start. LW12-2 women’s sit-skier Victor also did not start in the downhill event.

Visually-impaired B3 classified skier Bathum chatted with his guide, Sean Ramsden, immediately following both his races. While he was unhappy with his downhill run, Bathum was happy with and had fun during his seventh place run in the Super-G event where he finished with a factored time of 1:13.51, only 3.02 seconds slower than the winning time set by Spanish skier Jon Santacana.

United States skiers were scheduled to compete yesterday in the Slalom discipline but the competition was cancelled due to high winds. Several members of Team USA had a pizza party after the slalom cancellation. Friday’s scheduled event had been rescheduled as a result of predicted snow and high winds during the day. No snow arrived until late in the afternoon, where there was limited accumulation. Some of the younger members of Team USA took advantage of the night off on Thursday to go bowling before a busy training day Friday.

In other United States Paralympic news, Sir Philip Craven, the President of the International Paralympic Committee, told a Wikinews reporter the country will have live television coverage of the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. When a member of Team USA competing in La Molina was asked if they heard confirmation of this, they were unable to confirm. They did highlight the lack of United States media coverage was frustrating for fans wanting to follow the Games in London. According to the skier, many people he knew could only follow the Games by searching for video on sites like YouTube.

Women’s Super-G medal ceremony where Stephens, right, earned a bronze medal
Image: Raystorm.

Laurie Stephens in her gold medal downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Umstead and Umstead following Danelle’s Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Danelle Umstead coming to a stop following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Ralph Green following his Super-G run
Image: Raystorm.

Allison Jones in her downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Allison Jones coming to a stop following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Mark Bathum and his guide during their downhill run
Image: Laura Hale.

Bathum coming to a stop following his downhill ride
Image: Laura Hale.

Bathum and his guide discuss the race following their downhill ride
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor on course in her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Stephani Victor in the on course finishing area following her Super-G run
Image: Laura Hale.

Close up of Stephani Victor
Image: Laura Hale.



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February 22, 2013

Austria leads medal count after second day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

Austria leads medal count after second day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

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Friday, February 22, 2013

Following the second full day of competition at the IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain yesterday, Austria led the medal race with three gold medals, a silver, and a bronze. Markus Salcher won gold in the men’s standing downhill on Wednesday, with Matthias Lanzinger also making the podium in the bronze medal position. Claudia Lösch earned a gold in the women’s sitting Super-G event. Slacher and Lanzinger went gold/silver yesterday in the men’s standing Super-G to round out Austria’s medal total.

Solene Jambaque of France in the Super-G event at the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain.
Image: Laura Hale.

France leads in the total medal count with six, two of each kind. Yohann Taberlet won a bronze in the men’s sitting downhill. Marie Bochet won a gold and Solene Jambaque won a bronze in the women’s standing downhill. In the Super-G, Bochet and Jambaque went gold/silver. Taberlet earned a silver in the Super-G.

With only eighteen medals available a day, a number of countries have failed to make the medal podium. They include the Netherlands, with Anna Jochemsen finishing ninth in the women’s standing class in the Super-G yesterday, and Finland with Katja Saarinen finishing tenth in the same event. Australia’s Mitchell Gourley finished eleventh in the men’s standing Super-G. Czech competitor Oldrich Jelinek finished sixteenth in the men’s sitting Super-G. Arly Velasquez of Mexico finished fifteenth in the men’s sitting Super-G. New Zealand’s Adam Hall finished ninth in the men’s standing Super-G. Poland’s men’s visually impaired skier Maciej Krezel and guide Anna Ogarzynska finished thirteenth in the Super-G. South Korea’s Jong Seork Park finished twenty-fourth in the men’s sitting Super-G. Turkey’s Erik Bayindirli finished nineteenth in the men’s sitting Super-G.

Competition is scheduled to resume tomorrow with the slalom event after events were cancelled today because of predicted poor weather.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of Austria.png AUT 3 1 1 5
2 Flag of France.png FRA 2 2 2 6
3 Flag of Spain.svg ESP 2 0 0 2
4 Flag of Germany.svg GER 1 2 1 4
5 Flag of Russia.png RUS 1 1 1 3
5 Flag of the United States.png USA 1 1 1 3
7 Flag of Japan (geometric).png JPN 1 0 1 2
8 Flag of Slovakia.png SVK 1 0 0 1
9 Flag of Canada.png CAN 0 2 1 3
10 Flag of Great Britain with border.png GBR 0 1 2 3
10 Flag of Switzerland.svg SUI 0 1 2 3
12 Flag of Italy.png ITA 0 1 0 1



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Second day at IPC Para-alpine World Championships at La Molina delivers surprises

Second day at IPC Para-alpine World Championships at La Molina delivers surprises

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Friday, February 22, 2013

Yesterday in La Molina, Spain at the IPC Alpine World Championships, the Super-G event delivered several surprises — including a major schedule change; the favorite in the women’s visually impaired group failing to medal; one favourite in the women’s sitting group who did not start and another who did not finish; and in the men’s sitting group, a gold medal race won by less than a tenth of a second.

Audio introduction in English of the visually impaired women’s skiers
Audio: LauraHale.

The day started off on a different day than the discipline was originally scheduled for: it was supposed to take place tomorrow instead but the prediction of bad weather led to a date change. In the first event of the morning, the Women Super-G Visually Impaired final, Russian Alexandra Frantseva and guide Pavel Zabotin won the gold. Favourite Henrieta Farkašová from Slovakia, who had won the gold in the downhill yesterday and was quoted as saying her goal was to win five gold medals in these Championships, failed to medal at all in the Super-G. Two Britons completed the women’s visually impaired podium with yesterday’s downhill bronze medalist Kelly Gallagher and guide Charlotte Evans picking up a silver medal, and Jade Etherington and guide John Clark, the bronze.

In the Super-G Women’s Standing final, Frenchwoman Marie Bochet won the gold, her second so far in these Championships after her victory yesterday in the downhill. Her teammate Solene Jambaque got the silver, and Inga Medvedeva from Russia won the bronze. In the Men’s Visually Impaired final, Jon Santacana and his guide Miguel Galindo successfully defended their title and also won their second gold at the Championships. Chris Williamson and Robin Femy from Canada came in second, adding another silver to the one they won yesterday, and Swiss Hugo Thomas and guide Luana Bergamin won the bronze. Alessandro Daldoss from Italy, who had medaled yesterday, fell down and Did Not Finish.

In the Men’s Standing category, the gold went to Markus Salcher from Austria, also his second in these Championships. The silver went to another Austrian, Matthias Lanzinger, whilst Swiss Michael Bruegger won the bronze.

Claudia Loesch from Austria won the gold in the Women Sitting category, ahead of German Anna Schaffelhuber, silver, and Laurie Stephens from the USA, bronze. One of the favourites, Alana Nichols from the USA, Did Not Start the race, and another, Kimberly Joines from Canada, Did Not Finish it. However, arguably the race of the day was the Men’s Sitting class. Taiki Morii from Japan beat Yohann Taberlet from France by only 0.01 seconds. The bronze went to another Japanese skier, Akira Kano.

Today the skiers are to have a free day, and competition is scheduled to resume on Saturday with the Slalom event.

The podium of the Super G Visually Impaired class. Alexandra Frantseva and guide Pavel Zabotin, gold; Kelly Gallagher and guide Charlotte Evans, silver; Jade Etherington and guide John Clark, bronze.
Image: Raystorm.

Markus Salcher. 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships award ceremonies.
Image: Raystorm.

Jon Santacana and Miguel Galindo celebrating victory.
Image: Raystorm.

Jon Santacana y Miguel Galindo.
Image: Raystorm.

Claudia Loesch, gold; Anna Schaffelhuber, silver; and Laurie Stephens, bronze.
Image: Raystorm.

Spanish World Championship team.
Image: Raystorm.

Taiki Morii celebrating his win by one tenth of a second over Yohann Taberlet, who is not amused.
Image: Raystorm.

Taiki Morii.
Image: Raystorm.

The podium of the Super G Standing class. Marie Bochet, gold; Solene Jambaque, silver; Inga Medvedeva, bronze. 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina Spain.
Image: Raystorm.

Alexandra Frantseva and guide, gold medal at 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina Spain. Super G, visually impaired.
Image: Raystorm.

Hugo Thomas and guide Luana Bergamin. 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships award ceremonies.
Image: Raystorm.

Inga Medvedeva.
Image: Raystorm.

Hugo Thomas and guide Luana Bergamin
Image: Raystorm.

Claudia Loesch, gold; Anna Schaffelhuber, silver; and Laurie Stephens, bronze.
Image: Raystorm.

Yohann Taberlet, silver medal.
Image: Raystorm.

Podium Super G, Standing class. Markus Salcher, gold; Matthias Lanzinger, silver; Michael Bruegger, bronze.
Image: Raystorm.

Michael Bruegger.
Image: Raystorm.

Matthias Lanzinger.
Image: Raystorm.

National flags during a medal presentation.
Image: Raystorm.

National flags during a medal presentation.
Image: Raystorm.

Mitchell Gourley of Australia playing around after his race
Image: LauraHale.

2013 IPC Alpine World Championships award ceremonies. Resort mascots.
Image: Raystorm.



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February 21, 2013

IPC Alpine World Championship reschedules Super-G owing to weather

IPC Alpine World Championship reschedules Super-G owing to weather

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Thursday, February 21, 2013

At the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina Spain. Downhill event. Women’s standing group. Petra Smarzova of Slovakia.
Image: LauraHale.

Yesterday in La Molina, Spain, IPC Alpine World Championships event organizers changed the competition owing to poor weather predicted later in the week with the Super-G now set to be run today.

Skiers were expecting to have the day off, with a Sport Forum originally on the schedule for today and the Super-G on the schedule for tomorrow. Some skiers competing were not scheduled to arrive in La Molina until today.

The race is scheduled to start at 10:30 European Central Standard Time. There are 6 scheduled starters for the women’s visually impaired group including yesterday’s downhill gold medalist Henrieta Farkašová, 11 women in the standing group, 8 women in the sitting group, 16 men in the visually impaired group including Spaniards Jon Santacana and Gabriel Gorce, 22 men in the standing group including Australian Mitchell Gourley and New Zealander Adam Hall, and 29 men in the sitting group



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