Wiki Actu en

June 2, 2010

Thirteen die in Cumbria, United Kingdom, after series of shootings

Thirteen die in Cumbria, United Kingdom, after series of shootings

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Location of Cumbria within England.
Image: Airunp.

Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Police have found the body of a man they had been hunting in Cumbria, United Kingdom for a series of shootings. Police later confirmed that twelve people had been killed with a further thirteen injured, three critically. Shots were fired in Whitehaven, Seascale and Egremont, with a total of thirty different crime scenes. The Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant was locked down for the first time in its history.

The prime suspect was named as 52 year old local man Derrick Bird, a taxi driver. The first of Bird’s victims was a fellow taxi driver shot in Whitehaven at about 10.30 local time, with the following victims being shot at random as Bird drove down the west coast. Originally driving a Citroën Picasso, he was later said to be on foot when he crashed his vehicle.

Members of the public were advised by police to stay indoors, and for those who saw him not to approach him, but to call them. The manhunt covered the Boot or Scafell Pike area, and at 14:04 BST (13:04 UTC) the Deputy Chief Constable of Cumbria reported that a body believed to be Bird was found in a wood near Boot with a firearm, and that he had turned the weapon on himself.

The village of Boot, near where the suspect was found.
Image: Steve Partridge.

The affected area is popular with walkers and hikers, and currently, many schools across England are on half term, meaning the pupils have no classes.

British news network BBC News spoke to several eye-witnesses in relation to the incidents, from each of the areas, including Peter Watson of Whitehaven. “When I first got here it must have just happened. There was a man lying on the ground with police stood over him and a jacket on him,” he reported.

Home Secretary Theresa May is due to make a statement on the incident to the House of Commons tomorrow.



Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
2010 Cumbria shootings
Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media about .
Wikinews
Some information contained in this article was obtained from television, radio, or live webcast sources. Reporter’s notes and the broadcast source details are available at the collaboration page.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 2, 2009

Nuclear sites close as more UK workers walkout

Nuclear sites close as more UK workers walkout

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, February 2, 2009

Heysham nuclear power station
Image: Rwendland.

Workers at two nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom walked out today in the continuing row about foreign workers.

Contract staff at the Sellafield nuclear recycling facility in Cumbria walked out this morning. They were joined by staff at Heysham nuclear power station in neighbouring Lancashire. Workers at sites affected by industrial action last week walked out again today, with 200 leaving the Fiddlers Ferry Power Station in Cheshire and a further 1,000 at Grangemouth oil refinery and Longannet power station.

The UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown had condemned the wildcat action on Sunday, calling it “counterproductive”. This drew criticism from unions and opposition parties as he had previously promised “British jobs for British workers” at the Labour Party’s conference in 2008. Brown has insisted that clarification of European Union law and European Court of Justice decisions will allow people to see that discrimination doesn’t take place in future.

The Secretary of State for Business Lord Mandelson has backed the site’s owners Total S.A., telling the BBC that the company had “very strongly refuted” the allegations and that he believed them to be right. He added that the media was “feeding this xenophobia”. He added that he hoped the rebuttal would calm the situation, saying “I hope in the light of that people will be reassured and call off these unofficial disputes”.

This drew an angry reaction from the GMB union. General Secretary Paul Kenny said “Peter Mandelson is in denial about the nature of the problem that has given rise to the dispute. Overseas companies are refusing to employ UK nationals on projects in the UK. That is not right”.

Lord Mandelson’s shadow, Kenneth Clarke, also condemned the strikes on behalf of the opposition Conservative Party, saying “I understand people being worried about their jobs. I don’t think this is the right way to demonstrate it”. Some Labour MPs, however, have expressed more sympathy with the strikers. Health Secretary Alan Johnson called for EU law to be changed to stop global companies undercutting local wage rates, while former minister Frank Field said “This form of contract clearly cannot go on, where contracts are awarded and there’s free movement of companies but those companies then restrict who can apply for those jobs”. Another former minister, Peter Hain, also sided with the strikers, blaming the government for “gold plating” EU law (making EU-derived laws stronger or stricter than the original directive) and telling them to “stick up for British workers”. The leader of the Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg sounded a warning note about changing British or EU law, saying that “any attempt to ban EU citizens from jobs in Britain would be a massive own goal. If every EU country followed suit, we would have to cope with a massive influx of British people who work overseas”.

The unofficial protests began on Friday, when workers in industrial plants across the country walked out in sympathy with the staff at Lindsey Oil Refinery in North Lincolnshire. The refinery are striking over the awarding of a contract by the French-owned site to an Italian company. This led to 200-300 Italian and Portuguese workers arriving at the plant. Unions allege that British workers were actively prevented from applying for the jobs.

Protests have continued today outside the refinery.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 9, 2005

A leak at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing facility on Cumbrian coast, England

A leak at the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing facility on Cumbrian coast, England

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, May 9, 2005

The Sellafield facility on the Cumbrian coast, United Kingdom

At the Sellafield reprocessing plant, a leak in the process was spotted on April 19. The leak did not cause danger to people or the environment but it disturbed the normal operation of the plant.

Workers at the plant noticed a discrepancy in the amount of material being reprocessed that enters pipes that lead to a set of centrifuges and the amount of material actually arriving at the centrifuges. They used remote cameras to find the crack where the material was escaping; over twenty tonnes have leaked into a steel lined chamber.

The material, consisting of mostly uranium and some plutonium dissolved in nitric acid, would have been reprocessed in the centrifuges. The large stainless steel chamber that now contains the spilled material is too dangerous to enter due to radioactivity, though it poses no danger to those inside or outside the plant.

The plant has been shut down pending repairs.

Background

The Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant, or THORP, recycles spent nuclear fuel from British AGR and PWR reactors. (Another plant reprocesses fuel from Britain’s older Magnox reactors). Nuclear fuel reprocessing recycles spent nuclear fuel, greatly reducing the amount of waste. The process is technically complicated and there is a political debate on its safety. Since the price of nuclear fuel is presently low, fuel produced by THORP has had problems competing in the market. Furthermore THORP has encountered some technical problems lately. There is discussion whether THORP should be allowed to continue in operation.

Sellafield is also the site of, amongst other things, a decommissioned nuclear power plant. Previously the site has also been the scene of the 1957 Windscale fire, the most severe nuclear accident on British soil.

On February 17, 2005, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority reported 29.6 kg of plutonium was unaccounted for during audits at the facility. However, this is an error of 0.5%, and the IAEA allows a 1% error to allow for, e.g., mistakes on paper.

Looking over the facility out to sea.

Sources


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 12, 2005

Spanish trawler missing, three die in UK as storms hit northern Europe

Spanish trawler missing, three die in UK as storms hit northern Europe

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, January 12, 2005

As winds in the UK reach 124 mph, a Spanish fishing trawler is missing off the coast of Scotland and three people have died in northern Britain.

The UK Coastguard received an emergency beacon signal via satellite at 2330 UTC last night from a boat in the North Atlantic, 180 miles west of Scotland. No voice radio traffic had been received since the ship’s owners talked to the captain at 2030, when the crew reported that they were in difficulties and were losing power. There are 19 crew members on board, five Spansish and fourteen Portuguese. An RAF Nimrod search aircraft is due on-scene at dawn to search for the vessel.

Two lorries have been blown over. In Scotland, the lorry fell onto a car, killing the driver. In Northern Ireland, the lorry was blown off a bridge into the sea, killing the driver of the lorry. A third person died in Scotland when a van was blown into the path of an on-coming lorry.

Across Scotland, 60,000 people are without power, many roads are blocked by fallen trees, trains are not running and ferries are restricted to port. The Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in northern England has suffered superficial damage.

References

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress