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December 12, 2005

Indianapolis remains undefeated with win in Jacksonville

Indianapolis remains undefeated with win in Jacksonville

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Monday, December 12, 2005

The Indianapolis Colts beat the Jacksonville Jaguars 26-18 at ALLTEL Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida. The Colts remain undefeated 13 games into the 16-game NFL season.

Marvin Harrison caught two touchdown passes from Peyton Manning, including a 65-yard pass in the second quarter. Mike Vanderjagt kicked four field goals. The Jaguars, who were held to a single field goal in the first 3 quarters, scored two touchdowns in the last five minutes of the game.

The victory guarantees that Colts will finish with the best record in the AFC, entitling them to a bye in the first round of the playoffs, and home field advantage in the second and third rounds.

Only three other teams in NFL history have remained undefeated through the first 13 games of the season: the 1934 Chicago Bears, the 1972 Miami Dolphins, and the 1998 Denver Broncos. Only the 1972 Dolphins finished the season with perfection. They played a 14-game schedule with three playoff games, including a 14-7 win in Super Bowl VII over the Washington Redskins.

“Going 16-0 would be great, but it’s not the most important thing,” said Indianapolis coach Tony Dungy. “We’re going to keep our mantra: one game at a time. We’re going to do everything we can to beat San Diego and we’re not going to look ahead.”

The Colts face the San Diego Chargers next Sunday in Indianapolis.

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April 9, 2005

Bush EPA nominee abandons insecticide-on-children study after Senate hearing

Bush EPA nominee abandons insecticide-on-children study after Senate hearing

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Saturday, April 9, 2005

EPA logo

EPA’s map of participating family health clinics where babies and toddlers would be accepted for participation

Following a Senate hearing in which the Bush administration’s nominee for EPA administrator, Stephen Johnson, stoutly defended his plan to pay parents to document the effects on infants of insecticide use in the home, he reversed course and stopped the program.

Among the original requirements for the 60 families requested to be participants in the “Children’s Health Environmental Exposure Research Study” (CHEERS) study according to EPA were that they must:

  • Live in Duval County, Florida
  • Be a parent of a child under the age of 13 months
  • Spray or apply or have pesticides sprayed or applied inside your home on a routine basis (You do not need to change your regular household routine for the study.)

This original version of the requirements can be viewed in the Internet Archive, a free online repository that creates copies of websites on a regular basis. The third requirement was reworded by November 2004, according to the Internet Archive: “Maintain your normal pesticide or non-pesticide use patterns for your household. We will not ask any parent to apply pesticides in their home to be a part of this study.”

According to the above document, the area of Jacksonville/Duval County was chosen for reasons of existing year-round high usage of pesticides and other household chemicals within the home, as well as relevant data from existing prior studies. The study involved researchers visiting the home of participants, parents videotaping their children’s activities with a supplied camcorder, children wearing a small “activity sensor”, and parents collecting food and urine samples for detailed analysis of the effects of chemical exposure to common commercially available chemicals, primarily pesticides, on which “current information… is very limited” [1].

Selection for the study began in fall 2004. As incentives for their participation in the planned two-year study, parents were to be given $970, a t-shirt, and other gifts, and would have kept the video camera at its conclusion.

Senate opposition

Complaining that the study was necessary, Johnson yielded to two Democratic Senators who had threatened to block him, using all means available, from officially taking the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency, of which he is the acting head. The block on his nomination was lifted afterwards although some Democratic Senators would not say how they would vote on the final nomination.

Under his guidance, the EPA agreed to accept $2 million for the controversial $9 million CHEERS study from an industry trade group, the American Chemistry Council, which represents the chemical insecticide manufacturers. The study was to be conducted with the cooperation of the Duval County Health Department, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, based in Atlanta.

Senators Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and Bill Nelson, (D-FLA), demanded the cancellation of the study as proof of Johnson’s acknowledgement of what she called a “gross error in judgment”.

“The CHEERS program was a reprehensible idea that never should have made it out of the boardroom, and I am just happy that it was stopped before any children were put in harms way,” Boxer said. She added that testing on humans should not be a part of any United States environmental policy.

“I am very pleased that Mr. Johnson has recognized the gross error in judgment the EPA made when they concocted this immoral program to test pesticides on children,” Boxer said.

EPA review

Work on the study was halted last November by Johnson while an independent review of the study’s design was conducted at his request. Part of the reason for the study’s current cancellation was what the EPA in its press release has termed “mischaracterization” of the nature of the study as though children were being deliberately sprayed with pesticides.

Johnson defended his approach, “I have concluded that the study cannot go forward, regardless of the outcome of the independent review. EPA must conduct quality, credible research in an atmosphere absent of gross misrepresentation and controversy. I am committed to ensuring that EPA’s research is based on sound science with the highest ethical standards.”

In November 2004, William Farland, an administrator with the EPA’s research department, told The Oregonian, “There’s no suggestion that we are asking them to use pesticides. We simply want them to continue to carry out their day-to-day activities.”

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February 25, 2005

Mutant gene predicts common Parkinson\’s

Filed under: Archived,Health,Jacksonville, Florida,United States — admin @ 5:00 am

Mutant gene predicts common Parkinson’s – Wikinews, the free news source

Mutant gene predicts common Parkinson’s

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Friday, February 25, 2005

Jacksonville, Florida – A genetic mutation has been linked with typical, late-onset Parkinson’s in a step towards new drugs that target particular forms of the disease.

American and European researchers led by neuroscientists at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida discovered the mutation in a recently identified gene called LRRK2 that previous studies have already linked to some forms of Parkinson’s.

The mutation, dubbed G2019S, is the first, the researchers say, to be associated with typical, late-onset Parkinson’s.

“From a research point of view, this is the first time we could identify what appears to be typical Parkinson’s disease cases before people develop symptoms,” says Mayo Clinic neuroscientist Matthew Farrer. “We know if someone inherits the mutation they are going to get Parkinson’s disease.”

The mutation was discovered by sequencing the LRRK2 gene in families with Parkinson’s from the US, Norway, Ireland and Poland.

It was found in 22 of 42 family members of people with Parkinson’s while it was absent in more than 2,000 healthy controls.

All people with G2019S mutations shared a genetic pattern indicating a common, ancient ancestor.

The finding shows that the most common form of Parkinson’s disease, which was thought to be sporadic, has a genetic component.

While it’s a small number of cases, says Farrer, the finding should help in the creation of Parkinson’s models.

Farrer and colleagues are also starting to examine the cellular role of the LRRK2 protein and why the mutant gene causes disease.

“It’s an exciting time in the study of the genetics of Parkinson’s disease,” says Farrer, who notes that there are already clinical trials of drugs called mixed-lineage kinase inhibitors that may be targeted at the form of the disease linked with the mutation.

The research is reported in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

Sources


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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