Wiki Actu en

June 25, 2016

Britain votes to leave the European Union

Britain votes to leave the European Union

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, June 25, 2016

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

On Thursday, the United Kingdom (UK) voted to leave the European Union (EU) in a referendum.

During the referendum, voters were asked the following question with these options:

“Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?
Remain a member of the European Union
Leave the European Union”.

Voters across the UK voted in favour of leaving the EU by a margin 52% to 48%. Support for this outcome was strongest across the majority of England and Wales, with London, Scotland, and Northern Ireland the only regions where the majority voted to remain a member of the EU.

The Flag of Europe, used by the EU.

Following the results, David Cameron announced his intention to resign as the UK’s Prime Minister. It is expected he will remain in his post before the UK Conservative Party choose a new leader ahead of their annual conference in October. He also said he would not invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, the process by which a member can leave the EU, leaving that to his successor as Prime Minister. A number of officials at the EU — which would be down to 27 members with the UK gone — in a statement said they would like this process to begin “as soon as possible”.

At the start of trading on Friday the markets reacted negatively to the result, with the FTSE 100 falling in value by £120 billion. Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England, stated an extra £250 billion will be made available to help stabilise markets.



Sources[]

Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 14, 2015

UEFA Euro 16 draw takes place in Paris

UEFA Euro 16 draw takes place in Paris – Wikinews, the free news source

UEFA Euro 16 draw takes place in Paris

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, December 14, 2015

Football
Football (soccer ball).svg
Related football news
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

On Saturday evening, UEFA Euro 2016 draw took place at the Palais des Congrès in Paris; UEFA Euro 2016 is scheduled to be hosted in France. 24 nations were grouped in six groups, with the host nation getting Group A. The quadrennial football tournament of Europe is scheduled to start in June 2016, the matches to be played in ten French cities.

England had the first draw, and went to Group B. Interestingly, Wales also drew into Group B. World Cup winners Germany got Group C. Polish national captain Robert Lewandowski, who recently scored a brace against Croatian Dinamo Zagreb for Bayern Munich, would be facing his Bayern Munich teammate Thomas Müller in a Group C match.

Two-time defending Champions Spain got the D. Netherlands did not qualify for the first time since 1984 after a shocking exit in the qualifying match.

In full, groups drew as follows:

Group A, France, Romania, Albania, Switzerland.
Group B, England, Russia, Wales, Slovakia.
Group C, Germany, Ukraine, Poland, Northern Ireland.
Group D, Spain, Czech Republic, Turkey, Croatia.
Group E, Belgium, Italy, Republic of Ireland, Sweden.
Group F, Portugal, Iceland, Austria, Hungary.

The opening match of the tournament is scheduled to be France versus Romania.



Sister link[]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg UEFA Euro 2016#Final draw

Related news[]

Sources[]

Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 13, 2014

Northern Irish politician Reverend Ian Paisley dies aged 88

Northern Irish politician Reverend Ian Paisley dies aged 88

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, September 13, 2014

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Ian Paisley in 2009.
Image: Scottish Government.

Reverend Ian Paisley — Lord Bannside — the former First Minister of Northern Ireland, hardline unionist politician, and Protestant preacher, died yesterday aged 88.

Paisley’s wife Eileen released a statement saying: “My beloved husband, Ian, entered his eternal rest this morning. Although ours is the grand hope of reunion, naturally as a family we are heartbroken. We loved him and he adored us, and our earthly lives are forever changed.”

Paisley helped form the Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster in the early 1950s, later going into politics under the banner of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP). Paisley’s fiery preaching was uncompromising and fundamentalist: he was once expelled from the European Parliament for calling Pope John Paul II the “anti-christ”. When Northern Ireland was debating the decriminalisation of homosexuality, Paisley led a campaign opposing the change titled “Save Ulster from Sodomy“. Politically, Paisley became known as “Dr No” for his attitude towards compromise with republicans.

This firebrand rhetoric calmed with the successful negotiation of a peace process and with Paisley entering into shared governance with Sinn Féin’s Martin McGuinness. McGuinness paid tribute to Paisley via Twitter: “Very sad to learn that Ian Paisley has died. My deepest sympathy to his wife Eileen & family. Once political opponents – I have lost a friend.” McGuinness also said of Paisley: “I want to pay tribute to and comment on the work he did in the latter days of his political life in building agreement and leading unionism into a new accommodation with republicans and nationalists.”

UK Prime Minister David Cameron described Paisley as “one of the most forceful and instantly recognisable characters in British politics for nearly half a century” and noted that Paisley’s willingness to enter into shared governance with republicans “required great courage and leadership, for which everyone in these islands should be grateful”. The current First Minister Peter Robinson said Paisley “was the founding father of the new Northern Ireland”.

Former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair said Paisley “began as the militant” but “ended as the peacemaker”. The former Irish taoiseach Bertie Ahern said of Paisley: “In my younger days I found him a very difficult character but we ended up very good friends. He was a valuable character in the peace process.”



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 2, 2014

Gerry Adams arrested over 1972 Jean McConville murder

Gerry Adams arrested over 1972 Jean McConville murder

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, May 2, 2014

Politics and conflicts
Related articles

UN Members Flags2.JPG
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Gerry Adams in 2011.
Image: Domer48.

Gerry Adams, the leader of the Irish republican party Sinn Féin, was arrested Wednesday by the Police Service of Northern Ireland as part of an investigation of the 1972 disappearance and murder of Jean McConville, a mother of ten. McConville was taken from her flat in Divis in west Belfast shortly before Christmas of 1972, then shot. The Irish Republican Army (IRA) later admitted to the abduction and killing.

A statement from the police said: “Detectives from the serious crime branch investigating the abduction and murder of Jean McConville in 1972 have arrested a 65-year-old man in Antrim. The suspect is currently being interviewed by detectives at the serious crime suite in Antrim police station.”

Adams has said he is “innocent of any part” of the murder of McConville: “I believe that the killing of Jean McConville and the secret burial of her body was wrong and a grievous injustice to her and her family. Well publicised, malicious allegations have been made against me. I reject these. While I have never disassociated myself from the IRA and I never will, I am innocent of any part in the abduction, killing or burial of Mrs McConville.”

Mary Lou McDonald, vice president of Sinn Féin, said the arrest was politically motivated arguing it was a “concerted and malicious effort to link Gerry Adams to this case for considerable time”. The Police Service of Northern Ireland reject this claim.

The Sinn Féin leader’s arrest follows the release of audio tapes held by Boston College containing oral history from former members of the republican movement including members of the IRA. A number of arrests have been made following the release of the ‘Belfast Project’ tapes.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 17, 2013

Ryanair sue Associated Newspapers, Mirror Group

Ryanair sue Associated Newspapers, Mirror Group

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, August 17, 2013

Aviation

Zepper-BK 117-C2-(EC145)-SchweizerischeRettungsflugwacht.jpg
Related articles
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Irish budget airline Ryanair have added newspaper publishers Associated Newspapers and Mirror Group to their legal targets in a High Court defamation action filed yesterday in Dublin that also targets Channel 4.

A Ryanair Boeing 737 pictured in 2006.
Image: WikiABG.

The move confirms the carrier’s expression of intent to sue Channel 4 after the UK broadcaster screened Secrets of the Cockpit, a documentary about safety at the airline, on Monday night. Part of the Dispatches series, the show reported on an incident in Spain last year where three Ryanair jets declared fuel emergencies after being diverted to Valencia. Fuel policy was a strong focus for the documentary.

Pilots interviewed for the programme said they felt pressured to save fuel, the cost of which has hit Ryanair’s profits. The Spanish Air Authority described Ryanair flights usually landing with a bare minimum of fuel, in a report the airline dismissed as “manifestly inaccurate and factually untrue”.

Ryanair have also sacked veteran pilot John Goss for appearing on the show, the only pilot interviewed who did not seek anonymity. Ryanair have stated intent to sue Goss and claim he confirmed in the weeks before the show that he had no issues with his employer’s safety. Goss is a member of Ryanair Pilots Group (RPG), which the airline call a union front.

Channel 4 previously promised when threatened with legal action to see Ryanair in court. “We stand by our journalism, and will robustly defend proceedings if they are initiated,” a spokesperson said. The Belfast Telegraph was also sued but the action has been dropped after the Northern Irish publication issued an apology. The paper had published a story titled “Are budget airlines like Ryanair putting passengers at risk?”.

Associated Newspapers are behind The Daily Mail and its online and Sunday variants. Mirror Group publish The Daily Mirror, its Sunday sister, and The People.

Secrets of the Cockpit also examined an RPG poll of 1,000 Ryanair flight crew, dismissed by the airline as part of unionisation efforts. According to the RPG survey almost 90% of respondents said the safety culture was nontransparent. Two-thirds said they felt uncomfortable raising safety issues, with a pilot interviewed by Channel 4 accusing Ryanair of “threats and bullying”. Ryanair had told pilots anybody signing a “so-called safety petition” might be dismissed.

Over 90% of those surveyed wanted a regulatory inquiry, with RPG saying the survey results were passed to the airline and the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA). The IAA has already called the programme a “misguided attack” on Ryanair, saying “Ryanair Plc fully complies with all European and international regulations in all areas of its operations”.

Cquote1.svg We have been instructed to vigorously prosecute these libel proceedings Cquote2.svg

—Ryanair’s lawyers

The IAA itself was accused of failing to respond to concerns from Ryanair pilots and one interviewee said his “personal belief is that the majority of Ryanair pilots do not have confidence in the safety agencies and that is a pretty critical issue”. The authority responded “The IAA has responded to personal letters and reports from Ryanair pilots, this included several meetings and face-to-face interviews with pilots and their legal and professional representatives.”

Ryanair makes heavy use of zero-hour contracts, which do not guarantee work and which the Irish Airline Pilots’ Association describe as offering some of aviation’s worst employment conditions. RPG chairman Evert van Zwol, also a recent Dutch Airline Pilots Association president, said zero-hour contracts tended to make pilots choose to fly when unwell and keep quiet if they had safety concerns. In 2005 a Polish Ryanair pilot became lost near Rome a few days after attending his son’s funeral, while his Dutch co-pilot was seeing his first experience of navigating severe weather.

In the 2005 incident air traffic control intervened to keep the flight safe from midair collisions. The Polish pilot told Italian investigators he feared losing his job if he took extra time off work. The investigation concluded in 2009 he had been unfit to fly. Ryanair denied he would have been fired for taking time off to recover.

Secrets of the Cockpit also reported that in twelve separate serious incidents data from cockpit voice recorders had been wiped before investigators could access it, which the carrier says is a common occcurrence in aviation and attributed to pilot error.

In Sweden a report into a Ryanair emergency landing concluded this week an airline employee wiped the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder to prevent the investigation accessing them. The aircraft had returned to an airport near Stockholm shortly after takeoff suffering electrical malfunctions. Ryanair reject the Swedish Accident Investigation Authority’s take on the missing data, telling newspaper Södermanlands Nyheter recordings were reset by a technician trying to repair the aircraft after consultation with Ryanair’s technical department, who did not think the recordings needed saving.

Ryanair, which has never suffered a fatal accident, says the documentary is “false and defamatory”, and the IAA says it is “based upon false and misleading information”. “We have been instructed to vigorously prosecute these libel proceedings,” said a statement from Ryanair’s lawyers, who promised “other litigation is pending”.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 18, 2013

Northern Ireland police arrest man over Belfast double shooting

Northern Ireland police arrest man over Belfast double shooting

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, February 18, 2013

Crime and law
Related articles

Crime and law
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The Police Service of Northern Ireland arrested a man on suspicion of attempted murder and threatening to commit murder Saturday after a shooting incident in the Northern Irish capital Belfast Friday.

Two men, one aged 24 and the other 22, were both seriously injured in the incident at Old Park Road in the north of Belfast, which was reported to police about 7:30pm local time Friday. The 24-year-old man, identified by UTV Live as Sean Corbett, had recently departed from a shop and was standing near a vehicle when as many as ten gunshots were fired at him. The 22-year-old victim, who has not been identified, was sitting inside the vehicle and also suffered numerous gunshots wounds.

Corbett was transported to Mater Infirmorum Hospital, where he was subsequently given urgent surgery. The other man, who managed to drive to hospital himself, was also given medical treatment for his wounds. The last reports indicated both men were in stable condition.

North Belfast Area Commander Chief Inspector Andy Freeburn spoke against the shooting, calling it, “unacceptable in our community”. He described the incident as “an utterly reckless attack with up to 40 members of the public, including women and children, in close proximity”, adding: “[W]e are lucky that we are not dealing with many more casualties today.” The suspect is understood to be cooperating with police as they investigate the incident.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 8, 2012

Hillary Clinton condemns violence in Northern Ireland

Hillary Clinton condemns violence in Northern Ireland

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, December 8, 2012

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called yesterday (Friday) for an end to violence which has taken place in Northern Ireland this week, following the decision of Belfast City Council to stop flying the Union Flag year round. Clinton, who was on a visit to Belfast as part of a four-day tour of Europe, said that violence “is never an acceptable response to disagreements.”

Hillary Clinton
Image: Glenn Fawcett.

At a press conference also attended by Northern Ireland First Minister Peter Robinson and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness, Clinton condemned the violence: “We have seen this week the work is not complete and I join in condemning the recent attacks,” she said. She also called for all Northern Ireland parties “to confront the remaining challenge of sectarian divisions, peacefully together”.

She said that even though peace in Northern Ireland was “remarkably durable”, “there are still those who would try to destroy it.”

Cquote1.svg [violence] is never an acceptable response to disagreements. Cquote2.svg

Hillary Clinton

Even though Clinton will be stepping down as Secretary of State next month, she pledged to continue working on the peace process in Northern Ireland, “I offer to you, as I stand down from Secretary of State, to continue working with you in developing the peace process as an advocate and cheerleader for the process and to reach out to those who are not feeling part of it.”

This week’s outbreak of violence in Northern Ireland followed the decision by Belfast City Council to only fly the Union Flag on certain designated days, instead of all-year round, as is currently the case. Although nationalists on the council had wanted the flag removed completely, Alliance persuaded them to vote for their compromise proposal, whereby the flag would only be flown on certain designated days per year.

Alliance MP for East Belfast Naomi Long has received death threats, which Clinton called “unacceptable”. A Carrickfergus Alliance party office was set on fire and two Bangor councillors’ homes were attacked.

Hillary Clinton and her husband Bill Clinton have visited Northern Ireland several times previously. Bill Clinton played a key part in convincing both sides in the conflict to agree to end the violence.

Since becoming Secretary of State in 2008, Clinton has visited over 100 countries, meaning she has visited more countries during her tenure than any other Secretary of State.

There is now speculation as to whether Clinton will launch another presidential bid, following her failed campaign in 2008, when she was beaten to the Democratic Party nomination by Barack Obama. Several international figures have said they would support her presidential candidacy, including former UK prime minister Tony Blair, and Jordanian minister Nasser Judeh. 57% of those polled in a recent survey by the Washington Post indicated that they would support Clinton’s candidacy although she has denied that she is planning to run.

Clinton is now to continue her tour of Europe, which is expected to be one of her last foreign trips as Secretary of State, with visits to the Czech Republic and Belgium.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 3, 2012

Report says UK teachers \’boosted GCSE marks\’

Report says UK teachers ‘boosted GCSE marks’

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, November 3, 2012

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

According to a new report by the United Kingdom exams regulator Ofqual, some teachers have been marking students’ General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) coursework “significantly” too high.

Cquote1.svg “Children have been let down. That won’t do”. Cquote2.svg

—Glenys Stacey

Pupils sit GCSEs aged between 14–16. Part of the pupils’ overall grade is made up of controlled assessment, which usually takes place in a controlled environment in school. The rest of the grade comes from the final exam.

Chief Regulator Glenys Stacey said schools were under too much pressure to achieve certain grades, which contributed to the over-marking. She also said exams place too much emphasis on teachers’ marks. “We have been shocked by what we have found. Children have been let down. That won’t do. It’s clear that children are increasingly spending too much time jumping through hoops rather than learning the real skills they need in life. That won’t do.” She said English teachers had been put under particular pressure. “Teachers feel under enormous pressure in English, more than in any other subject, and we have seen that too often, this is pushing them to the limit. That won’t do either.”

The leaders of several teaching unions objected to the report. “For Ofqual to suggest that teachers and schools are to blame is outrageous, and flies in the face of the evidence. Ofqual is responsible for ensuring fairness and accuracy in the system”, said Deputy General Sectretary of the of the ASCL union Malcolm Trobe. “The fact remains that different standards were applied to the exams in June and January and this is blatantly wrong. The accountability measures do place tremendous pressure on teachers and schools, especially at GCSE grade C, but to say that teachers would compromise their integrity to the detriment of students is an insult.”

There was controversy concerning GCSE English exams in the UK earlier this year. In June’s GCSE English exam, the grade boundaries were different from the exam in January, which meant thousands of pupils received lower June grades than they would have in January. The Welsh Education Minister Leighton Andrews ordered a re-grading of Welsh pupils’ exam papers; pupils who sat exams in England were left with their original grades.

Ofqual released an initial report, finding that the grade boundaries set for the June exam were correct but the exam in January was in some cases “graded generously”.

Pupils in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland currently sit GCSEs. This year, the UK government announced plans to replace GCSEs with a new examination, similar to the old O-levels. In Scotland pupils currently sit Standard Grade examinations, which will shortly be replaced by National 4 and 5 exams.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 2, 2012

U.K. Teachers \’boosted GCSE marks\’

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, November 2, 2012

United Kingdom
Other stories from the United Kingdom
Location of the United Kingdom

A map showing the location of the United Kingdom


Wikinews uk.svg
News from the United Kingdom

To write, edit, start or view other articles on the United Kingdom, see the United Kingdom Portal

According to a new report by the U.K. exams regulator Ofqual, teachers have been “significantly” over-marking some pupils’ GCSE coursework. Chief Regulator Glenys Stacey said that schools were under too much pressure to achieve certain grades, which contributed to the over-marking. She also said that exams place too much emphasis on teachers’ marks.

“We have been shocked by what we have found. Children have been let down. That won’t do. It’s clear that children are increasingly spending too much time jumping through hoops rather than learning the real skills they need in life. That won’t do.” She said that English teachers had been put under particular pressure. “Teachers feel under enormous pressure in English, more than in any other subject, and we have seen that too often, this is pushing them to the limit. That won’t do either.”

The leaders of several teaching unions reacted angrily to the report: “For Ofqual to suggest that teachers and schools are to blame is outrageous, and flies in the face of the evidence. Ofqual is responsible for ensuring fairness and accuracy in the system.” Deputy General Sectretary of the of the ASCL union Malcolm Trobe said.

“The fact remains that different standards were applied to the exams in June and January and this is blatantly wrong. The accountability measures do place tremendous pressure on teachers and schools, especially at GCSE grade C, but to say that teachers would compromise their integrity to the detriment of students is an insult.”

Cquote1.svg “Children have been let down. That won’t do”. Cquote2.svg

—Glenys Stacey

There was controversy concerning GCSE English exams in the U.K. earlier this year. In June’s GCSE English exam, the grade boundaries were lowered from the exam in January, which meant thousands of pupils received lower grades than expected. The Welsh Education Minister Leighton Andrews ordered a re-grading of Welsh pupils’ exam papers but pupils who sat exams in England were left with their original grades.

Ofqual conducted an initial report into the June exam, which found that the grade boundaries set for the June exam were correct and the exam in January was “graded generously”.

Pupils in England, Wales and Northern Ireland currently sit GCSES. This year, the U.K. government announced plans to replace GCSEs with a new examination, similar to the old O-levels In Scotland pupils currently sit Standard Grade examinations, which will shortly be replaced by National 4 and 5 exams.



Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

United Kingdom teachers \’boosted GCSE marks\’

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, November 2, 2012

United Kingdom
Other stories from the United Kingdom
Location of the United Kingdom

A map showing the location of the United Kingdom


Wikinews uk.svg
News from the United Kingdom

To write, edit, start or view other articles on the United Kingdom, see the United Kingdom Portal

According to a new report by the United Kingdom exams regulator Ofqual, teachers have been “significantly” over-marking some pupils’ GCSE coursework.

Pupils sit GCSEs aged between 14–16. Part of the pupils’ overall grade is made up of controlled assessment, which usually takes place in a controlled environment in school. The rest of the grade comes from the final exam.

Chief Regulator Glenys Stacey said that schools were under too much pressure to achieve certain grades, which contributed to the over-marking. She also said that exams place too much emphasis on teachers’ marks. “We have been shocked by what we have found. Children have been let down. That won’t do. It’s clear that children are increasingly spending too much time jumping through hoops rather than learning the real skills they need in life. That won’t do.” She said that English teachers had been put under particular pressure. “Teachers feel under enormous pressure in English, more than in any other subject, and we have seen that too often, this is pushing them to the limit. That won’t do either.”

The leaders of several teaching unions reacted angrily to the report: “For Ofqual to suggest that teachers and schools are to blame is outrageous, and flies in the face of the evidence. Ofqual is responsible for ensuring fairness and accuracy in the system.” Deputy General Sectretary of the of the ASCL union Malcolm Trobe said.

“The fact remains that different standards were applied to the exams in June and January and this is blatantly wrong. The accountability measures do place tremendous pressure on teachers and schools, especially at GCSE grade C, but to say that teachers would compromise their integrity to the detriment of students is an insult.”

Cquote1.svg “Children have been let down. That won’t do”. Cquote2.svg

—Glenys Stacey

There was controversy concerning GCSE English exams in the U.K. earlier this year. In June’s GCSE English exam, the grade boundaries were lowered from the exam in January, which meant thousands of pupils received lower grades than expected. The Welsh Education Minister Leighton Andrews ordered a re-grading of Welsh pupils’ exam papers but pupils who sat exams in England were left with their original grades.

Ofqual conducted an initial report into the June exam, which found that the grade boundaries set for the June exam were correct and the exam in January was “graded generously”.

Pupils in England, Wales and Northern Ireland currently sit GCSEs. This year, the U.K. government announced plans to replace GCSEs with a new examination, similar to the old O-levels. In Scotland pupils currently sit Standard Grade examinations, which will shortly be replaced by National 4 and 5 exams.



Related news

Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress