Wiki Actu en

September 16, 2015

Subway sandwich empire co-founder Fred DeLuca dies

Subway sandwich empire co-founder Fred DeLuca dies

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Obituaries
Wikinews-logo-obituaries.png
 
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Fifty years after starting his first sandwich shop as a teenager, Subway CEO and co-founder Fred DeLuca died on Monday. He was 67 and suffering from cancer.

A Subway restaurant in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Image: Ian Thomson.

Subway yesterday announced his death, but not the location. He had developed leukaemia, which the company announced in 2013. The business was founded with friend Peter Buck who lent DeLuca $1,000 to open Pete’s Super Submarines in Bridgeport, Connecticut. The company remains based in the state.

By 1968 the business was renamed Subway and the two young entrepreneurs began looking at franchising as a method of expansion. It worked: With over 44,000 locations Subway is the world’s largest fast food franchise. The company has locations in 110 countries.

Subway brands itself as a healthy alternative on the fast food market. It has faced various controversies: ingredients, contracts with franchisees, and longtime advertiser Jared Fogle have all come under scrutiny. Fogle left the company this year after admitting underage sex and child pornography offences.

“I knew nothing about making sandwiches, nor the food industry,” DeLuca would later write of his 1965 startup. Growing up he lived in state-owned housing in The Bronx, New York City. Forbes estimated his 2015 wealth at around $3.5 billion.



Sources[]

Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 4, 2012

Unarmed man killed by narcotics officer in The Bronx

Unarmed man killed by narcotics officer in The Bronx

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, February 4, 2012

New York
Other stories from New York
  • 23 March 2015: RTVE’s US correspondent gets condemnation for ‘false accusations and offensive insults’
  • 16 March 2015: The Wrecking Crew music documentary hits cinemas
  • 8 March 2015: Delta Air Lines jetliner skids off New York airport’s runway
  • 28 November 2014: Manhattanʼs ‘Little Spain’ comes to big screen, documenting Hispanic immigration in New York City
  • 23 October 2014: Wikinews interviews Kristian Hanson, producer-director of indie horror film ‘Sledge’
…More articles here
Location of New York

A map showing the location of New York

To write, edit, start or view other articles on New York, see the New York Portal

An unarmed man was killed by a New York City Police Department Narcotics Enforcement officer at his home in the Williamsbridge neighborhood of The Bronx, New York on Thursday, according to police. 18-year-old Ramarley Graham was pronounced dead at nearby Montefiore Medical Center. He was shot by a 9-millimeter semiautomatic pistol. The incident is currently being investigated by Internal Affairs, and a grand jury investigation is expected into whether criminal charges should be filed against the officers involved.

The incident began with Mr. Graham walking on the street near his East 229th Street home, police say. He was approached by plain cloths officers in NYPD marked raid jackets. The officers were investigating suspected drug sales at a bodega. As they were approaching, Graham fled on foot towards his home and was followed by the officers. After officers followed him into the building, he entered the bathroom. An officer ordered Graham to “Show me your hands! Show me your hands!” After he failed to comply, the officer shot Graham once in the chest.

There were no weapons found on Graham’s person or at the scene. There was a small bag of cannabis in the toilet.

Police said the officer who shot Graham and his supervising sergeant have been placed on modified duty in light of the incident. The names of the officers were not released, but the officer who shot Graham is said to be 30 years old and joined the NYPD in 2008.

Police commissioner Raymond Kelly said “We’re obviously trying to get the facts. A young man’s life was taken. … It’s the worst thing that can happen to a parent — to lose a child.” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said “We obviously have some real concerns [about the incident].”

This was the third time within a week a young man had died in a police-involved shooting in New York City. 22-year-old Christopher Kissane was killed in an alleged carjacking in Cypress Hills, Brooklyn and 17-year-old Antwain White was killed in an alleged mugging in Bushwick, Brooklyn.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 13, 2011

New York tour bus crash kills 14

New York tour bus crash kills 14 – Wikinews, the free news source

New York tour bus crash kills 14

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Correction — March 15, 2011
 
The destination of the bus was in Manhattan, not Uncasville as stated in the article.
 

Sunday, March 13, 2011

Disasters and accidents

F5 tornado Elie Manitoba 2007.jpg
Related articles
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

At least fourteen people have died after a chartered bus crashed in The Bronx, New York. According to authorities, the tour bus accident also injured eighteen other people, amongst which five were critically injured.

The vehicle was travelling from Mohegan Sun in Connecticut to the village of Uncasville, also located in Connecticut. When the crash occurred on Interstate 95 at approximately 0535 EST (1035 UTC) on Sunday, there were at least thirty-one passengers present.

40-year-old Ophadell Williams, the driver of the bus, reported to the police that the vehicle came into contact with a semi-trailer truck, which was veering across the interstate. He said that he attempted to move out of the way of this vehicle, causing the bus itself to swerve, overturn and scrape the side of a railing for one hundred yards before impacting with a highway sign’s upholding bar.

Captain James Ellson, of the fire service, described the scene as “a pile of humans, either still in their seats or on the floor, wrapped in the metal”. Jose Hernandez, one of the survivors of the bus crash, said that “[w]e tried to help people, but there was twisted metal in the way”.

The semi-trailer truck driver failed to stop after the accident. Police are currently attempting to detect this driver. Raymond Kelly, the current New York City Police Commissioner, stated that the truck was moving on a lane to the bus’ nearside, although whether the vehicles came into contact with each other or not is yet to be confirmed. Both vehicles were travelling at “a significant rate of speed”, according to Kelly.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 8, 2010

Bronx, New York church destroyed in suspicious blaze

Bronx, New York church destroyed in suspicious blaze

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, March 8, 2010

New York
Other stories from New York
  • 23 March 2015: RTVE’s US correspondent gets condemnation for ‘false accusations and offensive insults’
  • 16 March 2015: The Wrecking Crew music documentary hits cinemas
  • 8 March 2015: Delta Air Lines jetliner skids off New York airport’s runway
  • 28 November 2014: Manhattanʼs ‘Little Spain’ comes to big screen, documenting Hispanic immigration in New York City
  • 23 October 2014: Wikinews interviews Kristian Hanson, producer-director of indie horror film ‘Sledge’
…More articles here
Location of New York

A map showing the location of New York

To write, edit, start or view other articles on New York, see the New York Portal

Second-alarm flames engulfed a Bronx, New York church, St Nicholas of Tolentine, just before noon on Friday, forcing its pastor and seven worshippers into the streets.

The blaze began in a confessional-converted-storage room near the vestibule of the church. “I rushed over and smoke was billowing out,” said Father Joseph Girone. Girone rushed parishioners through the church rectory door as the entrance had been blocked.

Over 100 firefighters fought the blaze, and several reported minor injuries due to ceiling collapse.

Fire Department (FDNY) officials immediately suspected arson. “The fire accelerated rapidly [and] it was a heavy fire that didn’t have the normal flow of a fire”, said FDNY Deputy Chief Kevin Scanlon. Investigators are determining whether the fire is related to a series of church burnings that have been occurring across the borough.

Parishioners are distraught by the destruction of their beloved church. Father Joseph Tran said, “The whole vestibule is damaged. The ceiling, the walls and the doors”. Isabel Gonzales, a regular attendant for 28 years, said, “I feel sorry and I want to cry because this has been my home away from home for a long time”. A church official reported that it was too early to determine construction lengths or repair costs.

Devoted worshippers promised that they would hold a “Stations of the Cross” gathering outside on Friday night.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 11, 2009

New York City Mass Transit facing service cuts

New York City Mass Transit facing service cuts

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, December 11, 2009

New York
Other stories from New York
  • 23 March 2015: RTVE’s US correspondent gets condemnation for ‘false accusations and offensive insults’
  • 16 March 2015: The Wrecking Crew music documentary hits cinemas
  • 8 March 2015: Delta Air Lines jetliner skids off New York airport’s runway
  • 28 November 2014: Manhattanʼs ‘Little Spain’ comes to big screen, documenting Hispanic immigration in New York City
  • 23 October 2014: Wikinews interviews Kristian Hanson, producer-director of indie horror film ‘Sledge’
…More articles here
Location of New York

A map showing the location of New York

To write, edit, start or view other articles on New York, see the New York Portal
Photo of Cortlandt Street Station

Cortlandt Street is one of the stations proposed to lose night service

New York’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority is proposing to make service cuts to close its expected US$343 million (€234m, GBP £211m) budget deficit. The plan includes the elimination of multiple bus lines in The Bronx, Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn, the elimination of the W (Astoria, Queens to Lower Manhattan) and the Z (Jamaica, Queens to Lower Manhattan via Brooklyn) train services. Also included in the plan are cuts of nighttime bus and train service.

“We’re not going to rely on anyone else to do anything for us. We’re going to rely on ourselves.” MTA board member Mitchell Pally said, commenting on the New York state’s budget plan cutting $143 million of tax revenue from the agency. MTA Chairman Jay Walder has said in the past that he would not raise fares ahead of schedule.

Gene Russianoff of the Straphangers Campaign, a commuter advocacy group, said that the agency should take money from its current construction and maintenance fund, and put it into maintaining these services.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 21, 2008

Pope concludes visit to US with Mass at Yankee Stadium

Pope concludes visit to US with Mass at Yankee Stadium

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, April 21, 2008

Benedict XVI in NYC on April 19.
Image: Taís Melillo.

Sunday was the last day of Pope Benedict XVI’s six-day visit to the United States. The first event was a visit to the World Trade Center site in Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York.

The Pope rode his Popemobile down a ramp, to the bottom of the site. Accompanied by Cardinal Edward Egan, the archbishop of New York, he knelt at a rectangular pool and prayed silently for the victims of the September 11 attacks. Then he held up a single lit candle, before he began to speak.

“Turn to your way of love those whose hearts and minds are consumed with hatred,” the Pope said. “Grant that those whose lives were spared may live so that lives lost here may not have been lost in vain.”

The Pope crosses East 60th Street in Central Park on Saturday with heavy police security.
Image: Oquendo.

“God of peace, bring your peace to our violent world; peace in the hearts of all men and women and peace among the nations of the earth,” he said. Afterwards, he met with family members of 16 of the victims and also with four of the rescue workers.

“I didn’t really have anything to say to him,” George Bachmann, a now-retired fire fighter, who broke his back and suffered burns as a first responder. “Being in his presence was enough for me.”

In the afternoon on Sunday, Benedict XVI travelled to The Bronx to hold Mass at Yankee Stadium, which is the home stadium for the New York Yankees baseball team. The stadium has been the scene of papal Masses by Paul VI in 1965 and John Paul II in 1979.

Final touches are being put on the stage at Yankee stadium on Saturday.
Image: llahbocaj.

The Popemobile entered the stadium at 2:19 p.m. EDT (UTC-4) and drove around the baseball field in front of the crowd of over 57,000.

“Your pastoral visit is for all of us gathered here in New York a blessing for which we are all grateful,” said Cardinal Egan in his introduction. “It is an extraordinary privilege to be allowed to tell you what a deep and appreciated grace your presence is for all of us.”

Benedict XVI told the crowd that the Mass was “a summons to move forward with firm resolve to use wisely the blessings of freedom, in order to build a future of hope for coming generations.”

Early preparation of Yankee Stadium on April 19.
Image: llahbocaj.

During the homily, the Pope said “The Gospel teaches us that true freedom, the freedom of the children of God, is found only in the self-surrender which is part of the mystery of love. Only by losing ourselves, the Lord tells us, do we truly find ourselves.” He also touched on the subjects of peace, human rights and religious freedom which had been hallmarks of his previous addresses while in the United States.

It also marked the 200th anniversary of the archdioces in New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Louisville, which were all created in April 1808.

“It’s like Jesus Christ visiting America,” Clemens Semon, 50, a resident of Ozone Park, Queens who immigrated from Ivory Coast told The New York Times. “You see how many pack together, come together to see him? He’s a unifier, he brings hope and peace.”

Pope Benedict XVI delivers remarks at farewell ceremony at JFK Airport on Sunday.

Vice President Dick Cheney and his wife Lynne Cheney joined the Pope for the farewell ceremony at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport. Senator and presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton had been expected, but did not attend. They were even mentioned in Cheney’s prepared remarks.

“You’ve encountered a nation facing many challenges, but with more blessings than anyone could count,” Cheney said in his five-minute speech. “All Americans respect your message of peace, justice and freedom.”

In the Pope’s remarks, the pontiff mentioned the visit to the World Trade Center site, “My visit this morning to Ground Zero will remain firmly etched in my memory.” His last comment as he turned to leave was, “May God Bless America.”

Benedict XVI waved goodbye from the doorway of his Alitalia “Shepherd One” at 8:40 p.m. EDT.

The papal airplane “Shepherd One” touched down at Rome Ciampino Airport, Italy, at 10:40 a.m. CEST (UTC+2) on Monday.



Related news

Sources

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Benedict XVI in United States
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 24, 2007

Baby falls from third floor window and survives

Baby falls from third floor window and survives

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, November 24, 2007

On Thursday, November 22, Thanksgiving Day, Bradley Priebe, a one-year-old baby boy fell from a third floor apartment window in New York City, New York. He has now been allowed to leave the hospital after staying overnight for observation. According to reports, the child sustained no serious injures from the fall and is in stable condition.

Anna Priebe, the baby’s mother says that it is “a miracle” that her son did not break any bones. Brandon, the father, says that the boy is doing “good. Everything’s OK.”

Bradley crawled out of the window and fell onto the roof of a Bronx music shop. The window was nearly 20 feet from the ground. The family thought the window was closed.

Police say that there is no reason to suspect that the incident is a criminal action, and no charges have been filed against the parents.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 3, 2007

Frank Messina: An interview with the \’Mets Poet\’

Frank Messina: An interview with the ‘Mets Poet’

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, October 3, 2007

Bookmark-new.svg

Frank Messina: “Some of the greatest poetry has been born out of failure and the depths of adversity in the human experience.”
photo: David Shankbone

In the early Olympic games, athletes used to run a mile and then recite a poem. The first poet-in-residence of an English football team, Ian McMillan, remarked that football chants are like huge tribal poems. Generally, though, sport and poetry have never seemed natural companions in human enterprise. Until the New York Mets baseball team suffered in 2007 arguably the worst collapse in Major League Baseball history. To describe the anguish fans felt, The New York Times turned to a poet, Frank Messina. “Nothing was really representing the fan’s point of view,” Messina told Wikinews reporter David Shankbone in an interview. “There’s a lot of hurting people out there who can’t express what happened.”

And to those who read the Times last Saturday, Messina wants you to know his father never apologized for raising him as a Mets fans. “I never asked for his apology, and he never apologized, nor did he owe us one. I was misquoted in the New York Times.”

Messina’s parents taught him about opposite ends of the spectrum of life. “My mother was supportive even when I made mistakes. She taught me to never give up no matter what vocation you choose in your life.” Whereas Messina’s mother taught him to never give up, his father taught him how to die with grace. He passed away from cancer in 2005. “I got to see a man who accepted his fate. He was like the Captain of the Titanic. My mother was also calm. I was the one freaking out inside. I saw someone who had acknowledged his own demise, accepted it, and died at home. He was a tough old guy. It takes a lot to accept that; it takes a very strong person. Some of the special moments toward the end was sitting with him and watching baseball games.”

It is baseball that has garnered Messina attention now. He has performed in 32 countries and 40 states, and in 1993 he founded the band Spoken Motion, a spoken word band. What is striking about Messina is that his work has branched two worlds that often don’t interact: downtown coffeehouse denizens of poetry and the denizens of Shea Stadium. It is Frank Messina who has personalities as diverse as Joe Benigno, the archetype of the New York sportscaster at WFAN, reflecting on love and poetry. “No one would question a poet writing about love for a woman,” said Benigno, “but when you’re a fan of a team, the emotional attachment is even stronger….” Benigno sounded similar to avant-garde writer and musician David Amram, who said Messina’s poems paint “the stark beauty of the streets, the pain of 9/11, the joy of everyday life, the mysteries of love all fill the pages of this book. It’s a feast of images and sounds that stay with you.”

I spoke with the person Bowery Poetry Club founder Bob Holman called the “Rock n’ Roll Poet Laureate” recently in Washington Square Park:


DS: You have received a good deal of attention recently.

FM:Even though I’m not Michael Jackson or somebody, when people come up to me and introduce themselves and say, ‘Hey Frank, my name is John,’ I say, ‘Hey John, my name is Frank’ and they laugh. It’s a funny phenomenon.

DS: What goes through your head when that happens?

FM: I understand it. I’ve gone to readings and concerts. I look at it as human interaction. Over the years I have performed in 32 countries and 40 states. I’ve been doing this professionally since I was in my twenties, and before that since I was sixteen doing little tidbit poetry readings in coffeehouses. The band I started in 1993, Spoken Motion, received a lot of recognition as a spoken word band born out of the New York spoken word scene. I worked with some great musicians and performed around the world. I remember signing my first autograph to a kid when I was 25 years old. As time went on, I came out with books and CDs, and I became used to that kind of thing. To me, the ultimate feeling of success as an artist, is to move somebody enough where they thank you. When someone comes up and says, ‘Frank, thank you, your work is great.”

DS: You have a long career in poetry, but as of late the attention you have garnered is for the Mets-inspired work. How do you feel about having a lot of your work overshadowed by the Mets work?

FM:It’s ironic. Some of the greatest poetry has been born out of failure and the depths of adversity in the human experience. Walt Whitman, the first great American poet, wrote about the Civil War. He went looking for his brother, George Whitman, after he a telegram telling him his brother was injured in the South. When he started out his poems were about beating drums, and blow, bugle, blow. Real patriotic. Then he started to see the real horrors of war. He was able to tap into the human condition and the situation at that time. Eventually when he found his brother he had resolution.
I experienced that kind of adversity during 9/11 being a civilian volunteer. I loaded ferry boats in Jersey City across the river to deliver goods to Ground Zero. I turned to Whitman to find some understanding of what is happening in the world right now. When I wrote my 9/11-related poems, that was true adversity. I realize baseball is just a game.

DS: Can you recite a stanza that expresses how you feel right now?

FM: This was a piece that the Times only quoted one stanza, but it’s about preparation for a battle, and being prepared to either rise to the occasion, or go down:

Do you know what it’s like
to be chased by the Ghost of Failure
while staring through Victory’s door?
Of course you do, you’re a Mets fan
caught in a do-or-die moment
in late September at Shea

As one that’s battled hard
through many a broken dream
Let me say, “in order to rise to the occasion
you must be willing
to go down with the ship”,
Have no fear, no hesitation,
for Winning shall be it’s reward!

Don’t let them get in your head!
you’ve kept it up this long
You’re a Mets fan in late September
and you’ll fight til the glorious end
Cheer the team today;
(your boys in orange and blue)
Let them hear you shout
as they fight for what’s mightily due

(copyright Frank Messina; reprinted with permission)

DS: Sports fans aren’t known as patrons of poetry. Have you had interaction with ‘new readers’ through your Mets work?

FM: This one person who I never met took a picture of me and sent it to me in an e-mail. The e-mail said, ‘Frank, I have never bothered you during the game, but I just wanted to say thank you for your work and thank you for making some sense of the successes and failures and I wish you much success with your work.’
Last year in my section at the stadium I had a banner that read We Know’. That’s all it said. Then earlier this year these shirts started to come out that said, “Poet says We Know“. It was amazing. We didn’t use the banner this year, though, because we didn’t know. The team wasn’t so far ahead that we knew. Last year we just knew we were going to the playoffs; we knew we were going post-season. This year we weren’t sure. We were walking on eggshells.
There was a woman, a season ticket holder and a die hard fan. She was staggered by the loss last year to the Cardinals. Last year she came up to me during one of the games late in the season; she was so happy we were going to the post season. By that point we had clinched it. She handed me a shirt she bought at the stadium and she gave me a big hug. With tears in her eyes she said, “Thank you, Mets Poet, thank you.” It’s cool…it’s like another family.

DS: Moments like that must make you realize you have touched people who aren’t normally touched by poetry.

FM: It’s opened up a new fan base, so to speak. For the last year SNY has broadcast footage of me with my poems, so quite a few fans known about the ‘Mets Poet’. I have never called myself that, by the way. The back of my jersey says ‘The Poet’ because growing up that was my nickname. My brother was a runner and they used to call him The Birdman–Birdie–and they called me The Poet. It was a natural thing, but I never coined myself as ‘The Mets Poet.’

DS: Jack Nicholson once said, “The fuel for the sports fan is the ability to have private theories.” What are some of your private theories?

FM: The fan is always right. No matter if he is wrong, he is right. The fan always has an opinion. That’s why we have talk radio and people call Joe Benigno and Steve Somers and Mike and the Mad Dog all day long. That’s why we have 24/7 sports-related talk. If you were to come from another planet with only three hours on Earth to find out what human beings are like, to discover how dynamic life is as a human being, you would take them to a baseball game. A season is like a life, but a game is like one day in that life. A season has its beginning, its renewal, its innocence and its arch into maturity into the season. Panic sets in when it hits the middle-age of the season. Will it we have success, or will we have failure. At end of season, fans have to accept whether we have failed or whether we have achieved victory. Kansas City Royals fans know at the beginning of the season that, more than likely, nothing is going to happen for them. As Mets fans, we want to win, but we never expect it to be easy. It’s always going to be a fight; it’s always going to be hard.

DS: The second-class citizen in a first rate city idea that is found in one of your poems.

FM: Yeah, you’re going to get pushed around. People are going to disagree with you. It’s not going to be easy. You’re going to have to take a lot of pills, take an extra drink, go to the gym an extra day to run off some energy.

DS: You and poet Ron Whitehead embarked on a “War Poets” tour of Europe. You as a pro-war poet, and Whitehead as a pro-peace poet. Forgive the crude terminology; I realize there is probably nuance in there. In the over four years since that tour has your outlook evolved at all?

FM: I’ve never been for any war. I try to avoid altercation on any level, be it emotional, physical, or political. But there are some wars I think that are necessary. History has shown this. Was this one necessary? I don’t know. Twenty years from now we’ll have to figure that out. I hope that we’ve all learned something from it.

DS: What is your feeling toward the Iraq War now?

FM: It’s a mess. It’s a mess. We went in to get a job done, get Hussein out of there, liberate the Iraqi people as was dictated in the 1998 Liberation Act that Senator Lieberman helped draft and President Clinton put out there. President Bush, Congress and the American people supported going in there. I’m not going to backtrack: I did support going in there, and even as an artist and a poet, and as a freak, I made a decision, that it was time to take this guy out. I spoke with many Iraqi Americans who live in my neighborhood who also supported that. Lebanese and Iranian friends I have supported it. One of my childhood friends, Adel Nehme, came out of Beirut, Lebanon around 1972. We met in kindergarten and we’ve been friends ever since. He was someone who escaped that turmoil. His family brought him to New Jersey specifically to pull him out of that hell, like the way my father took us out of the gangland hell of the South Bronx. Like any father would do, to protect his family.

DS: Do you still feel the Iraq War is protecting us, and that the original reasons you supported it are still valid?

FM: It’s a mess. The original reasons? Yes. Looking back, hindsight is always 20/20. Unlike many artists, I have vocally supported the war. Many artists who support this war won’t say that. Ron Whitehead is a dear friend. We have mutual respect for each other but we disagree on a lot of issues. Nevertheless, there’s only one man I want fighting in the trenches of life with me, and that’s Ron Whitehead.

DS: When you look at the state of the world, what five descriptors come to mind?

FM: Chaos. Yearning for peace. Confusion. Desperation. Hope.

DS: And are you hopeful?

FM: Yes.

DS: Where do you get that hope from?

FM: My faith in the human spirit. I think people are inherently good.

DS: Joe Benigno said, “No one would question a poet writing about love for a woman, but when you’re a fan of a team, the emotional attachment is even stronger, because women come and go, but your team never changes.” Do you think that analogy really holds, because you are attracted to the Mets, and you are attracted to women, and the players on both of those teams in your life change.

FM: Loving a baseball team is having to put up with the imperfections, the routine of what kind of mood is it going to be today. It doesn’t come down to whether we are going to win or lose, it comes down to: is the player going to perform this way? Or , is the pitcher going to be ambivalent? Am I even going to have enough strength to watch this game? Am I going to wash my hands? Am I going to lay in bed all day? What am I going to do? The game becomes a reflection of true life in that way.

DS: The difference is that you know what to expect from the players on the Mets. They have defined roles and there is some certitude. With women, as the players change you don’t know what they are going to do; whereas in baseball the players have roles and you know what to expect of them.

FM: It’s a dangerous proposition being any fan, but particularly a Mets fan, because you are going to have to accept you will fall in love with imperfection. When you fall in love with a woman, you are accepting them for all their flaws, those elements that make them human, worts and all. And I accept my team worts and all. They have given me a great deal of joy, a great deal of entertainment, exhilaration, and a hell of a lot of pain like in any fan. This isn’t the Brady Bunch, this isn’t Leave it to Beaver. Few things are, if anything.

DS: You were the recipient of the 1993 Allen Ginsberg Poetry Award. In 1996 I met Ginsberg at the Naropa Institute in Boulder. I asked him about NAMBLA, the North American Man/Boy Love Association. He told me to follow him into the bathroom. As I stood there he peed and told me he wasn’t for having sex with children, but that he thought that age-of-consent laws were outdated, that he knew what he wanted when he was fifteen and that he thought everyone does at that age. He said he wasn’t for sex with children, but that it should not be illegal to have sex at that age. When you accepted the Ginsberg award, did you have an issue with some of his political stances?

FM: I was too young at the time to realize what he thought. I never knew what went on behind closed doors with Allen, and aside from meeting him a few times, I never knew him on a personal level. I accepted the nomination, like young people do each year, because of his poetry, not because of his politics. I was proud. That is what the award was designed for. There are laws in this country for a reason, to protect children and to protect people from predators. Whether Allen was a predator or not, I don’t have any idea.

DS: All evidence is that he was not a predator, but that he was a voice for change of age-of-consent laws.

FM: To me, it’s a non-issue. Put your hand on my kid and believe me, it’s all over for the predator. That’s my policy. When someone’s 18, that’s the deal. I’ll stick with the law on that one.

DS: What’s a lesson your mother taught you?

FM: To never give up. She was supportive even when I made mistakes, as a good mother will do. In school my parents were called up a lot. It was not easy being a parent of Frankie. Teachers were constantly calling. I was disruptive, I would talk out of line, I was a class clown. She taught me to never give up no matter what vocation you choose in your life. My mother was never critical of my poems and writing. We’re good friends and she’s a lot of fun.

DS: How would you choose your death?

FM: Either in battle or laying in bed with family around me.

DS: Have you ever had a moment where you saw your death?

FM: Yes, a couple of times. Once I was on one of those small planes flying to Pittsburgh last year to see the Mets, actually one of those 25-seat airplanes flying out of Newark in a lightning storm. We had ascended over Newark and the plane was struck by lightning. There was no panic on the plane at all, but something, we knew, was terribly wrong. I saw a flash of light when it hit the plane and a fellow across the aisle said, “Did you just see that?” and I said that I thought we were struck by lightning. He said it felt like something got ripped off the plane. There was so much turbulence. The stewardess came out with one of the co-pilots, who announced we were struck by lightning, but that we were going to continue the flight. There was a moment there, I think a good 30 seconds, where I was certain the plane was going to break apart.

DS: Did you have any realizations?

FM: I thought, this is it. This is it. There was acceptance. When my father was diagnosed with cancer in June of 2005 and I got to see a man who accepted his fate. He died two months later. He was like the Captain of the Titanic. My mother was also calm. I was the one freaking out inside. I saw someone who had acknowledged his own demise, accepted it, and died at home. He was a tough old guy. It takes a lot to accept that, it takes a very strong person. In this culture we value life very much, and some people look at death as a failure, but it’s going to happen to all of us. My theory is to help yourself, and help others in life.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


"The excerpted poem is copyrighted and must be fully credited and not cited separately from this article"

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 11, 2005

Fulton Fish Market leaves Manhattan after more than 180 years

Fulton Fish Market leaves Manhattan after more than 180 years

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, July 11, 2005

Since 1822, the Fulton Fish Market on South Street in Lower Manhattan has been operating virtually unchanged and surrounded by the ever-changing NYC. It is expected to be relocated to a new $85 million, 400,000-square-foot facility at Hunts Point in The Bronx beginning this week.

Originally set for January, the move was delayed until this month to allow time to add more safety and security items at the new facility.

Some restaurant food buyers expressed concern that a move to the new facility will raise fishmonger prices. Fish stall owners agree the move raises their overhead.

Rudy Washington, deputy to former mayor Rudy Giuliani, said that a plan by the city to open the fish unloading operations to a bidding process at the new facility could lead to mafia control. During Giuliani’s tenure, Washington was in charge of the cleaning up the market of mafia influence.

The market has gotten fish from a Long Island company since 1995.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 6, 2005

New York City Subway\’s skip-stop 9 service to make its last run May 27

New York City Subway’s skip-stop 9 service to make its last run May 27

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, May 6, 2005

NYC Subway map

On Friday, May 27, 2005, 9 trains on the New York City Subway will make their final run, ending rush-hour skip-stop service on the IRT Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line north of 137th Street-City College. During rush hours, the 9 is a skip-stop supplement to the 1, running the same route but skipping some stops in Upper Manhattan and the Bronx. At the same time, the 1 skips other stops, which are only served by the 9 at rush hours; some stops are served by all trains. This service pattern results in slightly faster trains, but longer waits for those going to or from skipped stations.

9 service was started on December 12, 1988, at first running during rush hours and middays. In the mid-1990s, midday 9 service was dropped.

The J-Z skip-stop services on the BMT Jamaica Line will not be affected, as many passengers ride straight through the skip-stop portion, making the faster service more worthwhile.

References


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress