Wiki Actu en

August 29, 2012

Colombian President announces peace talks with FARC rebels

Colombian President announces peace talks with FARC rebels

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Colombia
Other stories from Colombia
…More articles here
Location of Colombia

A map showing the location of Colombia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Colombia, see the Colombia Portal
Flag of Colombia.svg

FARC guerrillas marching during peace talks of 1998–2002.
Image: U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos announced on state television Monday that his government is to hold talks with FARC rebels who have been fighting the government since 1964. Regional media outlet Telesur said the negotiations will take place in Oslo, Norway on October 5 and will then continue in Cuba.

There has been a growing recognition in Colombia that after decades of war, only a peace settlement will allow the country to move forward. Colombian Chief Prosecutor Eduardo Montealegre commenting on Monday said the country “must move toward a peace process” whilst Daniel García-Peña, Peace Commissioner in the 1990s, said: “[…] I am upbeat. I think both the government and the FARC understand that continuing the war is senseless.”

FARC renounced kidnapping in February and released the last of its non-civilian captives in April. Previous negotiations between the parties ten years ago failed.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 26, 2011

Norwegian police lower death toll in massacre

Norwegian police lower death toll in massacre

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Norway
Other stories from Norway
…More articles here
Location of Norway

A map showing the location of Norway

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Norway, see the Norway Portal
Flag of Norway.svg

Flowers in front of the Oslo Cathedral the day after the attacks.
Image: Bjoertvedt.

Norwegian police have revised their estimate of total deaths in Friday’s attacks on Oslo and Utøya, now reporting that an estimated total of 76 people were killed, rather than the 93 previously reported. Of these, 68 were in Utøya and eight were from the bombing in Oslo. The police have not yet been willing to give a final figure for the death toll.

“This figure could still go up,” said National Police Commissioner Oeystein Maeland. “The search [for bodies] is ongoing.”

Previously significantly higher death tolls had been reported from the shootings on the island of Utøya, but were revised downwards. Maeland explained that the situation on Friday was “chaotic” and that some bodies may have been counted twice as police focused on helping the injured.

Meanwhile the toll from the bombing in the centre of Oslo that took place hours earlier was revised upwards from seven to eight.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 24, 2011

Norway gunman defends actions as \’gruesome but necessary\’

Norway gunman defends actions as ‘gruesome but necessary’

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Crime and law
Related articles

Crime and law
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Breivik’s Facebook profile picture.
Image: Anders Behring Breivik.

Further details on the motives of the man behind the attacks that killed over 92 people in Utøya and Oslo, Norway have been released. Geir Lippestad, the lawyer for the arrested gunman Anders Behring Breivik, said that Breivik considered his actions necessary:

“He thought it was gruesome having to commit these acts, but in his head they were necessary.” Lippestad also noted that Breivik had planned the attacks “for some while” before pursuing them.

These statements may confirm reports that the act had an extremist political motive. Documents and videos circulating on the Internet indicated that Breivik was politically opposed to multiculturalism and what he describes as “cultural Marxists”.

Breivik has been charged with terrorism and is due to appear in court on Monday.



 
This story has updates
 
See Norwegian police lower death toll in massacre, July 26, 2011
 

Related News

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 23, 2011

At least 85 dead in shooting at Norwegian youth camp

At least 85 dead in shooting at Norwegian youth camp

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Crime and law
Related articles

Crime and law
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

File:Anders Behring Breivik (Facebook portrait in suit).jpg

Anders Behring Breivik.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

A gunman, identified by Norwegian media as Anders Behring Breivik, has shot and killed at least 85 people at a youth camp on the island of Utøya in Norway. The 32-year-old man has been charged with both this attack and an explosion in the capital city of Oslo, which killed at least seven people. Police searched Breivik’s apartment in Oslo overnight and have been interrogating him.

Breivik is reported to have arrived at the camp dressed as a police officer, telling children to gather around him for protection before systematically shooting them. It is not yet known whether he acted alone; police say there are no concrete reports of a second gunman, but this cannot be ruled out.

The camp was organised by the Workers’ Youth League (AUF), which is affiliated with the Norwegian Labour Party. A number of sources, both inside and outside of Norway, are speculating that an opposition to the Labour Party’s immigration policies, especially regarding Muslims, was Breivik’s motivation for the attacks.

Islam is the second largest religion in Norway, after Christianity, and Breivik’s comments on the political website Document.no, where he posted using his real name between September 2009 and October 2010, expressed anti-Islamic sentiments. He described the religion as a “hate ideology”((no)) and compared it to Nazism. His Twitter account was used to post only a single comment, quoting social liberal philosopher John Stuart Mill: “One person with a belief is equal to the force of 100 000 who have only interests”.

Cquote1.svg a youth paradise turned into a hell Cquote2.svg

Jens Stoltenberg, regarding Utøya

Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg, who described the island as “a youth paradise turned into a hell”, reports that a number of children have not yet been located. He, and the families of some of the children killed, met with King Harald V of Norway, his wife Queen Sonja, and their son Crown Prince Haakon, and was said to have been “deeply touched” by the meetings.

He also said that it is “too early to speculate” about the shootings, and that the police should be allowed to continue with their investigations before people “jump to any conclusions”.

Breivik, who ran a farm, reportedly recently purchased six tonnes of fertiliser, which is speculated to have been involved in the making of the Oslo bomb.

The island of Utøya is closed to the public, and an official at the British embassy in Oslo does not recommend travel to the immediate area of central Oslo where the bomb was detonated. However, she is not discouraging travel to Norway, nor to Oslo.

 
This story has updates
 
See Norwegian police lower death toll in massacre, July 26, 2011
 

Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg 2011 Norway attacks

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Some information contained in this article was obtained from television or radio sources, or via a live webcast. Reporter’s notes and the broadcast/webcast source details are available on the discussion page.

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 8, 2010

Three arrested in al-Qaeda bomb plot

Three arrested in al-Qaeda bomb plot – Wikinews, the free news source

Three arrested in al-Qaeda bomb plot

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Norway
Other stories from Norway
…More articles here
Location of Norway

A map showing the location of Norway

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Norway, see the Norway Portal
Flag of Norway.svg

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Three alleged al-Qaeda members have been arrested in Norway and Germany for suspected involvement in a bomb plot. Norway’s Police Security service said that they were arrested for “preparing terror activities.” The three men had been watched both by Norway and the United States for over a year, and officials said that peroxide bombs were planned to be used.

It was unclear if the men, of which one had Norwegian citizenship, with the other two possessing permanent residence permits, had selected a target. One of the suspects was of Uyghur origin, another is Iraqi-Kurdish, and the third is from Uzbekistan.

Two of the suspects were arrested in Oslo while the other one was captured in Germany in collaboration with authorities there.

Norwegian and United States officials say that this bombing plot is linked to last year’s failed New York subway bombing scheme and another failed plot to bomb Manchester, England. These failed schemes also involved peroxide bombs.

Norway’s Police Security Service released a statement that said “[i]t is important to emphasize that those groups in Norway that may constitute a threat to national security are small and primarily involved in support activities to foreign countries. We would therefore like to stress that today’s apprehensions will not result in a different assessment of the current threat situation in Norway, and that the threat level will still be considered low.”



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 9, 2009

Ad-hoc Liaison Committee meets in Oslo, Norway

Ad-hoc Liaison Committee meets in Oslo, Norway

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, June 9, 2009

Palestine
Related articles
  • 1 July 2015: Palestinian prisoner Khader Adnan stops hunger strike, due to be released
  • 29 May 2015: Tony Blair resigns as envoy of Quartet to Middle East
  • 22 May 2015: FIFA president ‘on a mission of peace’
  • 29 April 2015: UN publishes report on 2014 Gaza conflict
  • 18 March 2015: Netanyahu’s Likud party wins election in Israel
Location of Palestine
State of Palestine (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The AHLC (Ad-hoc Liaison Committee) met in Oslo, Norway on June 7 and 8 to discuss the Palestinian economical situation in Oslo. Its mission is to bring the key donors of aid and relief together with the Israeli and Palestinian governments to address the current state of affairs between the two countries. The AHLC keeps track on how donor countries interact with the Palestinian authorities and how the support they provide is handled.

The press conference on the first day with Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre and Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad.
Image: Alejandro Decap.

Early on the first day, Norwegian Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre and Palestinian Prime minister Salam Fayyad both expressed optimism and hope for the Palestinian situation. Minister Støre underlined the importance of continuing aid, but stated that he understood that most countries still had problems because of the world economic crisis. As for the unstable political situation in Palestine, Prime Minister Fayyad explained that “the political instability is also a reason why we need more aid.”

During the second day, a press conference with Minister Støre clarified the motives of the donations saying, “It’s is important to stress that donors are not doing this as a humanitarian project. Our donor aid is a political project aim[ed] at supporting and sustaining the Palestinian Authority, a key institution in what is supposed to become an independent Palestinian state. That was the intention of the Oslo accords.”

Minister Støre continued, stating, “It’s very important to stress that without a political horizon what we do as donors becomes less meaningful. So the current states of affairs where the political horizon is unclear and where we don’t have political negotiations of the two states as previous commitments indicates and obligate the party’s. Donors start to change their stand and other agendas get the upper hand. So in 2009 at this present stage, donors have only delivered half the amount they had at this time last year. You can leave that up to the financial crisis, but at the big donor conferences in Paris December 2007, and Sharm el-Sheikh February 2009 there were pledges enough to carry this through.”

On the question if the donor countries had offered to give any immediate financial relief, Minister Støre said “This has to be stressed, [this] has not been a pledging conference. This has not been a donor conference where governments have been invited to come and make new pledges, as I said if everybody lived by their Paris pledges in December 2007, which were three year pledges, we are exactly half way in that, we would have been more or less fine. But I think we have seen a forthcoming approach by some delegations, I will not name them or put a figure on it but I think it follows from what the prime minister and I have together have expressed here that there is an urgent need.”

A new meeting has been scheduled for September in New York, New York in conjunction with the United Nations General Assembly.

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 17, 2009

After Eurovision win, Norwegians show their patriotism on Constitution Day

After Eurovision win, Norwegians show their patriotism on Constitution Day

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, May 17, 2009

Oslo schoolchildren taking part in the Children’s Parade at the Royal Palace on 2005’s Constitution Day. People from all over Norway celebrated the national holiday today with festivals and parties.

Alexander Rybak’s win for Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest on Saturday evening was well-timed; it was on the eve of Norway’s Constitution Day.

Constitution Day, observed on May 17, commemorates the first Norwegian constitution drafted at Eidsvoll in 1814. Now it celebrates Norwegian independence as a whole, which was granted by Sweden in 1905.

Eurovision win aside, Norwegians don’t necessarily need a good reason to celebrate Constitution Day; the Norwegian people are some of the most patriotic in Europe and the iconic national flag, red with a white and indigo blue Scandinavian cross, can be seen waving from buildings and in the hands of most Norwegians at festivals and parties.

Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg, on a visit to Spain, was greeted by 2,000 Norwegian expatriates waving flags in the town of Torrevieja, where he gave a speech, giving warm greetings in both Spanish and Norwegian. Stoltenberg noted that 40,000 Norwegians live in Spain, roughly 1% of Norway’s current population, and was impressed by the turnout not only from Norwegian citizens but also from Spanish people who also helped celebrate Norway’s Constitution Day. Stoltenberg was later joined by Spanish and Norwegians at the old sailor’s church in Torrevieja, where he placed a wreath commemorating fallen Norwegian sailors.

Boy Scouts, a symbol of Norwegian patriotism, march with Norwegian flags down Karl Johans gate in the 2005 Constitution Day parade.

In Norway, the annual Oslo Children’s Parade, a national institution, occurred in the morning with children from all 111 of Oslo’s schools taking part. The children walked with brass bands playing festive music up Oslo’s main street, Karl Johans gate, to the Royal Palace where they were warmly greeted by the Royal Family. Crown Prince Haakon and Crown Princess Mette-Marit, who greeted children in Asker earlier in the morning, toured the Oslo ward of Grünerløkka in the afternoon. All celebrations in Norway went off with few errors, the most notable being the delay of trains using the Oslo Tunnel, in which a helium balloon floated into the tunnel, causing a brief scare for train operators.

Celebrations for Norway’s Constitution Day occurred all over the world, from a gathering in a Shanghai hotel where 300 Norwegians feasted on imported traditional Norwegian foods, to a street parade in Brisbane, Australia, where the police had to stop traffic for the revelers. Norway’s neighbor Sweden was especially happy on Constitution Day, where Norwegian-Swedes dressed in folk costumes and held up copies of the newspaper Expressen, who deemed Norway’s winning Eurovision song “the best winner since ABBA” and published a large headline in Norwegian, stating “We look forward with you.”

Constitution Day will end with Norway’s new national hero Rybak, deemed “Alexander the Great” in the Norwegian newspapers, arriving at Oslo’s Gardermoen airport at 9:25 p.m. local time (1925 UTC). Record crowds are expected to greet him, as he invited everyone via state television to the airport for his trip home.

Sources

Related news

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 27, 2008

Libricide plans on ice at University of Oslo

Libricide plans on ice at University of Oslo

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, September 27, 2008

Norway
Other stories from Norway
  • 10 March 2014: Wheelchair curling enters third day at 2014 Winter Paralympics
  • 10 March 2014: Ukraine’s Lyudmyla Pavlenko wins gold in 2014 Winter Paralympics
  • 8 March 2014: Norway beats Czech Republic in sledge hockey overtime win in first match at Winter Paralympics
  • 6 January 2014: Wikinews interviews on contributions to open-source: Opera
  • 11 October 2013: Australia has mixed OECD rankings for literacy and numeracy amongst adults
…More articles here
Location of Norway

A map showing the location of Norway

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Norway, see the Norway Portal
Flag of Norway.svg

The library at the University of Oslo.
Image: Dagny.

The plan to incinerate over 200 years’ worth of archived newspapers at the University of Oslo was paused this week, following an article by the Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten publicising the intended destruction.

The unwanted archives take up 3 kilometres of shelf space, and neither the University nor the National Library are interested in retaining and storing the years of history any more.

The collection consists of both Nordic and non-Nordic newspapers, including Manchester Guardian, New York Times, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and Le Figaro.

A planned incineration of them in 2002 was avoided by moving them into a warehouse owned by Nils Christian Bang at Follum Grend, near Ringerike. Edgar Learn Borg, retired supervisor of the collection, continues to be involved in the preservation of the collection which hasn’t been accessed by researchers since its move.

The order came again to clean up the store. Frode Meinich, technical director of the University, says that the collection is not unique, and indicated that the University needs temporary storage for some antiquarian furniture during renovation of a music facility of the University.

In 2007, Frode Meinich told Aftenposten that a national program of infrastructure modernization was desperately needed. “For the time being we are managing to keep the ship afloat, but if something serious isn’t done in the next few years we have a major problem”.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 30, 2008

Ban on cluster bombs adopted by 111 countries

Ban on cluster bombs adopted by 111 countries

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, May 30, 2008

Today, representatives of 111 countries have adopted a formal ban on cluster bombs. The ban is to be signed and ratified by each country during December 2-3 in Oslo, Norway, the country that initiated the discussions on the ban.

Following almost two weeks of negotiations, the ban was agreed upon at a ceremony held in Dublin, Ireland. Signatories will be required to completely get rid of cluster bomb stockpiles within eight years.

Cluster bombs are characterized by the small “bomblets” that they release while falling. Many are opposed to this type of munition because the “bomblets” spread over a large area, meaning that they can easily injure or kill innocent civilians even when aimed at a specific enemy target.

Despite U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon voicing his hopes that all nations would agree to the ban, many countries have boycotted the ban, including the United States, Russia, Israel, Pakistan and India. Military analyst Marc Garlasco of the organization Human Rights Watch noted that these nations will be less likely to use the munitions due to the stigma that will be attached to them.

While widely celebrated, some criticize the pact for not being strong enough in its implications. For example, signatories will still be allowed to cooperate on military operations with non-signatories.

The ban will go into effect in mid-2009.



Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Convention on Cluster Munitions
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 5, 2008

Opening performance at Norway\’s new opera house postponed

Opening performance at Norway’s new opera house postponed

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, February 5, 2008

The new opera house of Oslo, Norway.
Image: Hans A. Rosbach.

The opening performance of Oslo‘s new Opera House is postponed due to security concerns. The late delivery of a critical stage control system means that the opera “Around the World in 80 Days”, composed by Gisle Kverndokk, has to be rescheduled for next season.

Opera chief Bjørn Simensen announced the postponement on Monday, describing it as “dramatic.” The performance that will replace “Around the World in 80 Days” is not yet announced.

The opening gala performance of the new Opera House on April 12th will proceed as planned.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress