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March 19, 2011

ICANN approves .xxx domain for pornography

ICANN approves .xxx domain for pornography

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Saturday, March 19, 2011
Yesterday, Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the agency governing Internet addresses, approved the creation of an “adult entertainment” Internet address, .xxx, on the web, first proposed in 2003. ICANN is the manager of the Internet’s top-level domains, such .com, .org and .net.

Cquote1.svg “For the first time, there will be a clearly defined Web address for adult entertainment, out of the reach of minors and as free as possible from fraud or malicious computer viruses Cquote2.svg

—Stuart Lawley, CEO ICM Registry

ICANN’s decision means success for the Florida-based ICM Registry (ICM), the company that first applied for the .xxx domain in 2004. ICM will oversee the new domain and will sell the .xxx Web addresses. ICM hopes that the establishment of a .xxx domain will contribute a degree of predictability and security to the largely unrestrained world of Internet websites. Its chief executive, Stuart Lawley, said, “For the first time, there will be a clearly defined Web address for adult entertainment, out of the reach of minors and as free as possible from fraud or malicious computer viruses.”

The decision was criticized by some of the Internet pornography industry’s biggest players who fear they could be the target of arbitrary censorship by governments and boards regulating the .xxx domain.

Anti-pornography campaigners also criticized the move, saying it gives the sex industry legitimacy. But since the .xxx system and its vetting process is voluntary, popular pornographic sites are not likely to trade their .com domains for .xxx. Anti-porn critics say that users who think they are avoiding porn by filtering out .xxx domains will therefore be misled.

ICM’s Lawley saw only positive outcomes from the decision: “Everybody wins. The consumer of adult sites wins. The providers will benefit because more people will become paying customers. And those who don’t want to go there will win as well, because the sites will be easier to filter.”



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June 24, 2008

We\’ll always have .paris: ICANN votes for top level domain registration in 2009

We’ll always have .paris: ICANN votes for top level domain registration in 2009

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Tuesday, June 24, 2008

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The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a non-profit organisation based in California, United States to regulate internet domain names, will vote on Thursday for a proposal to allow the open registration of top-level domains (TLDs) for Internet addresses. If the proposal succeeds, then as soon as next year any entity with sufficient funds may be able to apply for ownership of a relevant TLD, so that, for example, web sites could have addresses ending in .paris, .ebay or .love.

The range of TLDs has traditionally been heavily restricted by ICANN, with most being country codes (such as .uk for the United Kingdom, or .jp for Japan) or related to the purpose of a website (like .com for commercial websites, .edu for educational sites, and .org for non-profit organisations).

Some existing owners of TLDs have already set up arrangements that have made use of their flexibility – for example, the countries of Tuvalu and the Federated States of Micronesia have leased many domains on their country code TLDs (.tv and .fm respectively) to entertainment websites based on the association with “television” and “FM radio”.

Commentators have pointed out that this may open the way for the controversial .xxx domain, proposed for sites with adult content, which ICANN has previously rejected. Its existence will not be guaranteed in the new system, however, as domain registration will be subject to an independent arbitration process, and granted only when the registrant can demonstrate “a business plan and technical capability”, and applications may be rejected on “morality or public order” grounds. While the proposal does not include registration fees, the TLDs are predicted to cost several thousand dollars, at least.

ICANN CEO Paul Twomey, speaking with the BBC, compared the opening of domains to the opening of real estate in the United States in the 19th century. “It’s a massive increase in the geography of the real estate of the Internet,” he said.

The ICANN International Public Meeting, which opened in Paris, France on Monday, includes workshops and public forums as well as the ICANN Board meeting.



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March 30, 2007

Adult-only TLD rejected by Internet body

Filed under: .xxx,AutoArchived,Computing,ICANN,Internet,Pornography — admin @ 5:00 am

Adult-only TLD rejected by Internet body

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Friday, March 30, 2007

The creation of the proposed “adult-only” Top-Level Domain name, .xxx, has again been rejected today by the board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), which manages the Internet’s domain name systems. The creation of the TLD was opposed by a 9 to 4 vote, with one abstention on the part of ICANN CEO Paul Twomey.

The domain was first proposed in 2001, with reasons stated as creating an “adults-only” section of the Internet, making it easier to filter out pornographic or otherwise unsuitable websites for children. The proposal was approved in June 2005, with a final decision to be made in December of the same year. However, in May 2006, the decision was reversed, and the approval was revoked. In January of this year, the proposal was reopened.

The rejection of the creation of the TLD today was focused on the main reason of ICANN not wanting to become involved in “content regulation”. Steve Goldstein, ICANN board member, told the Associated Press that “the last point in our board’s resolution that under the revised agreement that we, ICANN, would be forced to assume ongoing management and oversight roles regarding the content, and that is inconsistent with ICANN’s technical mandate.”

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January 7, 2007

ICANN top-level .xxx domain name not dead yet

ICANN top-level .xxx domain name not dead yet

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Sunday, January 7, 2007

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) announced Friday that its vote in May last year was not to reject the creation of ‘Triple X’, a top-level domain (sTLD). Rather, the corporation voted “not to approve the agreement as proposed, but did not reject the application”.

A revised proposal for the .xxx domain is open to public comment until February 5. The revised proposal appears to have hinged on efforts by ICM, proponents of a voluntary adult top-level domain, to promote enforcement in the following areas:

  1. Prohibit child pornography
  2. Require clear labeling
  3. Support development of user empowerment technology
  4. Ensure that the child advocacy and free expression communities are involved in policy development for the sTLD.

Who, or what, ICM is remains unclear. The home page of ICM states that, “The .xxx top-level domain will create a clearly identifiable area of the Internet so that Internet users can be more informed when choosing to select or avoid adult entertainment sites.”

The estimated $12 billion per year in revenues generated by on-line pornography could come under the scrutiny of unknown ICM, to whom ICANN proposes delegating responsibility to an organization, or individual, that has nothing more to say about themselves on their website than the background of their leaders.

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May 10, 2006

ICANN rejects .xxx top-level domain name proposal

ICANN rejects .xxx top-level domain name proposal

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Wednesday, May 10, 2006

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) today rejected the creation of a .XXX top-level domain name in a 9-to-5 vote. The .XXX domain would have been created for use by websites that offered pornography. Supporters of the proposal, which would have created a new sponsored top-level domain (sTLD), say the ‘triple X’ domain would make it easier to recognise and filter pornographic websites. Opponents suggested that the domain wouldn’t be used by all sites, as registration would be voluntary, and that it would legitimise pornography.

Current sponsored top level domains include .coop, used by cooperative associations, .museum for museums, and .travel for travel agents, airlines, and other travel-related sites. .post, for postal services, is also currently under consideration.

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June 3, 2005

New top level domain approved

New top level domain approved – Wikinews, the free news source

New top level domain approved

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Friday, June 3, 2005

The ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) responsible for managing domain names and IP addresses, approved a plan Wednesday to create a new top-level domain (TLD) with the .xxx extension. They are working with the domain registrar, ICM Registry, to make the domains available as early as fall or winter. ICM plans to sell registrations of .xxx domains for $60 a year.

The new TLD was one of ten recently under consideration. .jobs and .Travel have already been approved.

The .xxx domain is intended for use by adult pornographic/erotic web sites. The stated reason a new TLD has been approved is to protect children from pornographic sites; a filter could simply block all .xxx pages.

The ICANN, established by the U.S. Department of Commerce in 1998, is a non-profit corporation responsible for the technical coordination of the Internet through the assignment of domain names and IP addresses.

The American Civil Liberties Union opposes the proposal since topics like homosexuality or birth control could be forced to use the domain, making them easily blockable by filters.

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