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August 23, 2015

Airshow collision kills one in Dittingen, Switzerland

Airshow collision kills one in Dittingen, Switzerland

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Sunday, August 23, 2015

A midair collision today killed a pilot during an airshow in the village of Dittingen in Switzerland.

An Ikarus C42 from file. The aircraft involved were similar.
Image: Peter Bakema.

The crash occurred as three Ikarus C42 planes from the German Grasshopper display team flew together in formation. Two collided and crashed, with one pilot ejecting and parachuting to safety and the other remaining on board and being killed. The third plane was not directly involved and landed successfully.

The northern Swiss village is near Basel. Basel-Landschaft police spokesman Meinrad Stoecklin put the time of the accident at 11:30a.m. The airshow was first halted as rescuers arrived, then cancelled altogether. It is unclear if there are any additional injuries.

Authorities have closed down access to the scene. The killed pilot’s plane struck a barn. The display team reportedly was using amateur pilots.

It is the third deadly European airshow crash in four days. On Thursday two planes carrying parachutists collided and crashed in West Slovakia. At least seven were killed. They had been practising for an airshow due to be held this weekend. Yesterday a vintage warplane crashed onto a busy road by Shoreham in England. Seven are confirmed dead, with the pilot critical and police continuing to search the scene for more bodies.



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August 20, 2015

Planes carrying parachutists collide, crash in Slovakia

Planes carrying parachutists collide, crash in Slovakia

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Thursday, August 20, 2015

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A LET 410, similar to the crashed aircraft, pictured from file in 2000.
Image: John Wheatley.

Two planes carrying parachutists collided this morning in western Slovakia, near the Czech Republic. Of around 40 on board, seven are confirmed dead.

The crash site near Červený Kameň is hard to access; rescuers are using helicopters. Investigators believe some passengers survived by jumping from one of the aircraft, which are believed to be twin-engined LET L-410s. An eyewitness told Dennik he saw people leaping from one aircraft as it went down.

The parachutists were practising over the White Carpathians, the mountains that form the Slovak-Czech border, for an upcoming airshow in Slavnica this weekend. Health Minister Viliam Čislák and Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák visited the site.

The aircraft collided at around 8:30a.m. at a height of around 5,000ft (1,500m). Photos of the scene show scattered wreckage, some of it aflame.



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March 12, 2015

Ten killed in helicopter crash in Argentina, French Olympians among the dead

Ten killed in helicopter crash in Argentina, French Olympians among the dead

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Thursday, March 12, 2015

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File photo of a ‘Eurocopter’, similar to the aircraft involved in the collision.
Image: Elisabeth Klimesch.

Three French sport stars are among the dead following a helicopter crash on Monday in Villa Castelli, Argentina. In total, ten people died after the crash, which involved two helicopters. The dead included passengers and both pilots in the mid-air collision. The victims were taking part in the French reality television show ‘Dropped‘ when the accident happened.

The victims included Olympic swimmer Camille Muffat, Olympic boxer Alexis Vastine and Florence Arthaud, a yachtswoman. Both pilots were Argentinian, the remainder of the victims were French and worked as part of the television shows production team. Bodies of all ten of the victims have been retrieved and taken to the morgue.

The accident occurred while both helicopters were flying at a low altitude in tandem. Amateur camera footage shows the helicopters colliding when one appears to fly into the path of the other. It remains unclear what caused actions which lead to the crash. Cesar Angulo, Secretary of Security for La Rioja, the province in which the accident happened released an update. He said “An explosion occurred and it’s believed that they must have collided. Aeronautical experts will have to determine that.”

French President Francois Hollande paid tribute to the victims. Speaking about the sport stars who lost their lives he said “They are dead because they wanted to push the boundaries. They wanted to make new exploits known to the world, make people aware of new countries and regions.” An involuntary manslaughter investigation has been opened by French officials. The procedure occurred automatically due to the fact the French citizens died abroad.

The television show involves contestants taking part in survival style activities in remote locations. Other contestants taking part included figure skater Philippe Candeloro, footballer Sylvain Wiltord, snowboarder Anne-Flore Marxer, swimmer Alain Bernard and Jeannie Longo, a cyclist. All the other contestants were uninjured during the accident.

The show, which was to be shown on TF1 in France started filming in February. The channel released a statement after the accident. They said “We learn with immense sadness of the accident that occurred during the filming of the show ‘Dropped.’ [Staff] come together in this terrible time with the pain of the families and those close to the victims”. French media announced that all contestants and crew are returning home and that filming had been suspended.

Muffat became the Olympic champion in the 400m freestyle event at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England. The 25-year-old also won a silver and bronze medal at the same games in different events. Vastine, 28, also competed at the 2012 games, being eliminated from the Light Welterweight category in the quarter finals. He won a gold medal in the 2008 games in Beijing, China. Arthaud, 57, was a yachtswoman who won the 1990 Route du Rhum.



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October 24, 2014

Two injured, three dead in mid-air collision near Maryland airport

Two injured, three dead in mid-air collision near Maryland airport

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Friday, October 24, 2014

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A helicopter and a small airplane collided near Frederick Municipal Airport in Frederick, Maryland just after 3:40 local time yesterday afternoon (1940 UTC). The collision was reported around a mile (one and a half kilometres) from the airport, just north of Interstate 70.

US FAA Seal

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said the Robinson R44 helicopter was on a training mission when it collided with a Cirrus SR-22. The helicopter had three people aboard while the Cirrus had two. Both people aboard the Cirrus were injured and all three aboard the helicopter were killed in the collision.

The two injured people from the plane were checked out at a hospital and have since been released.

The plane was still mostly in one piece while a witness reported the helicopter was unrecognizable.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) heads the investigation.



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August 17, 2013

Ryanair sue Associated Newspapers, Mirror Group

Ryanair sue Associated Newspapers, Mirror Group

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Saturday, August 17, 2013

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Irish budget airline Ryanair have added newspaper publishers Associated Newspapers and Mirror Group to their legal targets in a High Court defamation action filed yesterday in Dublin that also targets Channel 4.

A Ryanair Boeing 737 pictured in 2006.
Image: WikiABG.

The move confirms the carrier’s expression of intent to sue Channel 4 after the UK broadcaster screened Secrets of the Cockpit, a documentary about safety at the airline, on Monday night. Part of the Dispatches series, the show reported on an incident in Spain last year where three Ryanair jets declared fuel emergencies after being diverted to Valencia. Fuel policy was a strong focus for the documentary.

Pilots interviewed for the programme said they felt pressured to save fuel, the cost of which has hit Ryanair’s profits. The Spanish Air Authority described Ryanair flights usually landing with a bare minimum of fuel, in a report the airline dismissed as “manifestly inaccurate and factually untrue”.

Ryanair have also sacked veteran pilot John Goss for appearing on the show, the only pilot interviewed who did not seek anonymity. Ryanair have stated intent to sue Goss and claim he confirmed in the weeks before the show that he had no issues with his employer’s safety. Goss is a member of Ryanair Pilots Group (RPG), which the airline call a union front.

Channel 4 previously promised when threatened with legal action to see Ryanair in court. “We stand by our journalism, and will robustly defend proceedings if they are initiated,” a spokesperson said. The Belfast Telegraph was also sued but the action has been dropped after the Northern Irish publication issued an apology. The paper had published a story titled “Are budget airlines like Ryanair putting passengers at risk?”.

Associated Newspapers are behind The Daily Mail and its online and Sunday variants. Mirror Group publish The Daily Mirror, its Sunday sister, and The People.

Secrets of the Cockpit also examined an RPG poll of 1,000 Ryanair flight crew, dismissed by the airline as part of unionisation efforts. According to the RPG survey almost 90% of respondents said the safety culture was nontransparent. Two-thirds said they felt uncomfortable raising safety issues, with a pilot interviewed by Channel 4 accusing Ryanair of “threats and bullying”. Ryanair had told pilots anybody signing a “so-called safety petition” might be dismissed.

Over 90% of those surveyed wanted a regulatory inquiry, with RPG saying the survey results were passed to the airline and the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA). The IAA has already called the programme a “misguided attack” on Ryanair, saying “Ryanair Plc fully complies with all European and international regulations in all areas of its operations”.

Cquote1.svg We have been instructed to vigorously prosecute these libel proceedings Cquote2.svg

—Ryanair’s lawyers

The IAA itself was accused of failing to respond to concerns from Ryanair pilots and one interviewee said his “personal belief is that the majority of Ryanair pilots do not have confidence in the safety agencies and that is a pretty critical issue”. The authority responded “The IAA has responded to personal letters and reports from Ryanair pilots, this included several meetings and face-to-face interviews with pilots and their legal and professional representatives.”

Ryanair makes heavy use of zero-hour contracts, which do not guarantee work and which the Irish Airline Pilots’ Association describe as offering some of aviation’s worst employment conditions. RPG chairman Evert van Zwol, also a recent Dutch Airline Pilots Association president, said zero-hour contracts tended to make pilots choose to fly when unwell and keep quiet if they had safety concerns. In 2005 a Polish Ryanair pilot became lost near Rome a few days after attending his son’s funeral, while his Dutch co-pilot was seeing his first experience of navigating severe weather.

In the 2005 incident air traffic control intervened to keep the flight safe from midair collisions. The Polish pilot told Italian investigators he feared losing his job if he took extra time off work. The investigation concluded in 2009 he had been unfit to fly. Ryanair denied he would have been fired for taking time off to recover.

Secrets of the Cockpit also reported that in twelve separate serious incidents data from cockpit voice recorders had been wiped before investigators could access it, which the carrier says is a common occcurrence in aviation and attributed to pilot error.

In Sweden a report into a Ryanair emergency landing concluded this week an airline employee wiped the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder to prevent the investigation accessing them. The aircraft had returned to an airport near Stockholm shortly after takeoff suffering electrical malfunctions. Ryanair reject the Swedish Accident Investigation Authority’s take on the missing data, telling newspaper Södermanlands Nyheter recordings were reset by a technician trying to repair the aircraft after consultation with Ryanair’s technical department, who did not think the recordings needed saving.

Ryanair, which has never suffered a fatal accident, says the documentary is “false and defamatory”, and the IAA says it is “based upon false and misleading information”. “We have been instructed to vigorously prosecute these libel proceedings,” said a statement from Ryanair’s lawyers, who promised “other litigation is pending”.



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August 14, 2013

Ryanair threaten legal action after documentary on fuel policy, safety

Ryanair threaten legal action after documentary on fuel policy, safety

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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

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Irish budget airline Ryanair have stated intent to sue the UK’s Channel 4 over a documentary broadcast Monday night which discussed safety at the airline. Secrets of the Cockpit focused strongly on fuel policy and featured interviews with pilots.

A Ryanair Boeing 737 pictured in 2006.
Image: WikiABG.

Part of the Dispatches series, the show reported on an incident in Spain last year where three Ryanair jets declared fuel emergencies after being diverted to Valencia. Pilots interviewed for the programme said they felt pressured to save fuel, the cost of which has hit Ryanair’s profits. The Spanish Air Authority described Ryanair flights usually landing with a bare minimum of fuel, in a report the airline dismissed as “manifestly inaccurate and factually untrue”.

Ryanair say their planes carry more fuel than European Union legislation requires and point out the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) monitor their safety record, including fuel policy. Ryanair has never had a fatal accident and the IAA called Secrets of the Cockpit a “misguided attack” which was “based upon false and misleading information”.

The IAA itself was accused of failing to respond to concerns from Ryanair pilots and one interviewee said his “personal belief is that the majority of Ryanair pilots do not have confidence in the safety agencies and that is a pretty critical issue”. An IAA statement yesterday morning read “The IAA has responded to personal letters and reports from Ryanair pilots, this included several meetings and face-to-face interviews with pilots and their legal and professional representatives.” The statement added “Ryanair Plc fully complies with all European and international regulations in all areas of its operations”.

Cquote1.svg We stand by our journalism, and will robustly defend proceedings if they are initiated Cquote2.svg

—Channel 4

Channel 4 promised to see Ryanair in court, saying “We stand by our journalism, and will robustly defend proceedings if they are initiated.” Ryanair called the documentary “false and defamatory”. Other claims in the documentary included that twelve cockpit voice recorders had been wiped after serious incidents, which Ryanair blamed on pilot error and said is a common occcurence in aviation, and that a survey by Ryanair Pilots Group (RPG) found widespread safety concerns at the airline.

RPG is not recognised by the airline which calls the group “[lacking] any independence, objectivity or reliability”. The airline says they conducted their survey, which polled 1,000 flight crew, as part of a long campaign to unionise Ryanair pilots. The airline makes heavy use of zero-hour contracts, which do not guarantee work and which the Irish Airline Pilots’ Association describe as offering some of aviation’s worst employment conditions.

According to the RPG survey almost 90% of respondents said the safety culture was nontransparent. Two-thirds said they felt uncomfortable raising safety issues. Ryanair had told pilots anybody signing a “so-called safety petition” might be dismissed.

One anonymous pilot interviewed by Channel 4 accused the airline of “threats and bullying”. Over 90% of those surveyed wanted a regulatory inquiry, with RPG saying the survey results were passed to the airline and the IAA.

RPG chairman Evert van Zwol, also a recent Dutch Airline Pilots Association president, said zero-hour contracts tended to make pilots choose to fly when unwell and keep quiet if they had safety concerns. In 2005 a Polish Ryanair pilot became lost near Rome a few days after attending his son’s funeral, while his Dutch co-pilot was seeing his first experience of navigating severe weather.

In the 2005 incident air traffic control intervened to keep the flight safe from midair collisions. The Polish pilot told Italian investigators he feared losing his job if he took extra time off work. The investigation concluded in 2009 he had been unfit to fly. Ryanair denied he would have been fired for taking time off to recover.



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February 6, 2011

Investigation launched after two military aircraft nearly collide with passenger airliner

Investigation launched after two military aircraft nearly collide with passenger airliner

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Sunday, February 6, 2011

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An American Airlines Boeing 777.
Image: Adrian Pingstone.

A U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III.
Image: U.S. Air Force.

New safety procedures are to be implemented after an American Airlines Boeing 777 came close to colliding with two U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III aircraft off the coast of New York, United States, last month. Radar data indicates the aircraft came within 1 miles (2 km) of each other before the flight crew of the Boeing 777 took evasive action as an alarm sounded in the cockpit of the jet.

An aviation official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the traffic collision avoidance system alarm which sounded in the cockpit of the passenger jet, which had 259 people aboard, “may be what saved the day,” since C-17 cargo aircraft are not highly manoeuvrable. Investigators have reportedly found the aircraft would have collided head-on.

The National Transportation Safety Board has launched a “major investigation” into the incident, and confirmed there were no injuries in the incident. The Federal Aviation Administration, the government department responsible for aviation in the U.S., said in a statement air traffic controllers are “reviewing a variety of procedures including the handling of formation flights, aircraft near sector boundaries.”



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September 5, 2010

Two dead after two light aircraft crash in Isle of Wight, England

Two dead after two light aircraft crash in Isle of Wight, England

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Sunday, September 5, 2010

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Bembridge Airport, where the Merlin Trophy, a race organised by the Royal Aero Club Racing and Rally Association, was being held on Saturday and Sunday. The rest of the event has been cancelled.

Two individuals have died as the result of a light aircraft collision on the Isle of Wight in England, United Kingdom. The collision occurred at approximately 1700 BST (1800 UTC) on Saturday between Ryde and Newport, while two aircraft were participating in an organised race. Both of the aircraft were carrying two occupants. The two fatalities were both travelling in the same four-seat touring propeller aircraft. The two occupants of the second, a two-seat sports propeller aircraft, survived the crash, although one was hospitalised after the plane safely landed at Bembridge Airport.

Hampshire Constabulary, who later arrived at the location of the accident, have released a statement reading: “Police are at the scene of a fatal light aircraft collision at Havenstreet on the Isle of Wight. Police received the call from a member of the public this evening at 5.08pm to report two light aircraft in collision over the island. One of these aircraft, containing two people, suffered damage and made its way safely to Bembridge airport. The other aircraft, also containing two people, came down in a remote wooded area in the Havenstreet area. Both occupants of this second aircraft have now been confirmed dead.” The wing of the second aircraft was sliced off in the collision, and a farmer found it in an inverted nose-up position in woodland known as Rowlands Wood. The body of the second aircraft will be left in the woods overnight, and police closed off a nearby road while they carry out their inquiries.

The two aircraft were reportedly participating in the Rolls Royce Merlin Trophy, a race organised by the Royal Aero Club Racing and Rally Association, which has been held on the island since 1981. “There was a mid-air collision just before the finish of the race,” confirmed Tim Wassell, the chairman of the association. “Two planes were in collision and both had two men on board. One was a four-seater touring aircraft which, it would appear from witness reports, appears to have broken up mid-air and come down in woodland at Rowlands Woods. The second plane, a sports aircraft, was badly damaged by the collision but limped back to Bembridge Airport. The two occupants from there are safe.” The race was first held in 1911, when it was founded by Jaques Schneider, the French Under-Secretary for Air, to encourage progress in civil aviation.

“There were 19 planes taking part in the today’s race, the Merlin Trophy, which is a precursor to the main Schneider Trophy that was due to take place tomorrow but is now due to be cancelled. Two planes were in collision and both had two men on board. A four-seater touring aircraft was thought to have lost a wing and come down in woodland. The second plane, a sports aircraft, was badly damaged but limped back to Bembridge Airport,” Wassell said, telling reporters that the two survivors in the first aircraft were extremely shocked, but had no serious injuries. They were were both taken to hospital as a precaution.

The victims of this incident are currently remaining unidentified. “I would also ask that anyone who has recovered parts of the aircraft, which may be spread over a wide area, take them to Newport police station”, Inspector Paul Saville requested. An investigation has been launched by the Air Accident Investigation Branch and the police into the cause of crash.



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November 1, 2009

Search continues for nine missing after midair collision off California

Search continues for nine missing after midair collision off California

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Sunday, November 1, 2009

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Three days after a US Navy helicopter collided with a US Coast Guard airplane off the coast of California, a search and rescue mission is ongoing for the nine crew onboard the two aircraft.

The two on board the AH-1W SuperCobra attack helicopter and seven on the C-130 Hercules transport plane were trained in survival and described as being in good physical condition, meaning rescuers maintain hope of finding them alive. They all had heat-retaining drysuits but it was unknown if they were wearing them at the time.

The accident occurred at 7:10 p.m. on Thursday in an area of military airspace that is sometimes closed to the public, although its status at the time of the accident was not known. The helicopter had been in formation with two transports and another SuperCobra to practise night flying, while the Coast Guard plane was conducting search and rescue for 50-year-old boater David Jines. The search for Jines ends today whether he is found or not.

Rear Admiral Joseph Castillo said today that the missing air crews are “trained in survival tactics, they’re trained also with the will to live. We know they have the ability to survive longer than you might expect.” However, he also expressed concern that there may not be any survivors. “… hope gets less every day. My hope today is not what it was yesterday.”

After searching 644 square miles of ocean with nine aircraft debris has been located from both the aircraft, but no trace has been found of those on board. Operations are currently focusing near the military’s San Clemente Island, where an area of about 50 miles of floating wreckage is located.



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October 30, 2009

Nine missing after US Coast Guard plane and Navy helicopter collide

Nine missing after US Coast Guard plane and Navy helicopter collide

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Friday, October 30, 2009

A similar helicopter to the one involved

A search and rescue mission is underway off the coast of California for nine people missing after a US Coast Guard plane collided in midair with a Navy helicopter. The plane, a C-130 Hercules transport, was carrying seven and two were on the AH-1 SuperCobra assault helicopter.

A file photo of a C-130 transport plane

Searchers from the Navy and Coast Guard have found floating debris from the aircraft. The collision occurred roughly 15 miles from San Clemente Island, and a pilot in the area witnessed a fireball. Some debris is confirmed as coming from a C-130. The plane and crew were based at Coast Guard Air Station Sacramento and the helicopter and crew were from the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing presence at Camp Pendleton.

According to Petty Officer Henry Dunphy, the airplane was equipped with survival gear. “We’re hoping to find survivors. We’re not ruling that out,” he said.

The rescue operation is being conducted by both air and sea. Lieutenant Josh Nelson of the Coast Guard said that “we are throwing everything we can at this right now,” adding that the crews were trained in survival techniques.



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