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December 3, 2012

UK Wikinews Shorts: December 3, 2012

UK Wikinews Shorts: December 3, 2012 – Wikinews, the free news source

UK Wikinews Shorts: December 3, 2012

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A compilation of brief news reports for Monday, December 3, 2012.


Inverness police seize £45,000 worth of heroin

The Northern Constabulary have conducted a seizure of a significant amount of heroin in Inverness, in the Scottish Highlands, as part of a police operation there. The drugs, which were thought to be worth £45,000 on the street, were seized Saturday after Northern Constabulary officers had made enquiries.

Three people are scheduled to make an appearance at Inverness Sheriff Court in relation to this seizure today.

Sources



Bristol police appeal for help to find ‘vulnerable’ missing man

Avon and Somerset Constabulary have appealed for public assistance in finding 59-year-old man Stephen Cooper after he was recently reported missing. The South West England force has described the man, who is from the Fishponds area of Bristol, as “vulnerable”.

Cooper was sighted leaving Rosemary Residential Home, where he resides, at 0530 UTC Saturday. At the time he was wearing black shoes, a grey polar fleece, dark-coloured trousers and a blue jacket. The force have reported the possibility of Cooper travelling to London by train.

Cooper, who suffers from Huntington’s disease and depression because of having the disease, is described as being 5 feet 2 inches tall and having a dressing-covered cut on his forehead.

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January 21, 2012

US singer Etta James dies aged 73

US singer Etta James dies aged 73 – Wikinews, the free news source

US singer Etta James dies aged 73

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Saturday, January 21, 2012

Etta James in 2006.
Image: John K. Addis.

Legendary soul singer Etta James died aged 73 yesterday at Riverside Community Hospital in Riverside, California after a long battle with leukemia. She was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2009.

James was born in Los Angeles, California as Jamesetta Hawkins on January 25, 1938. She is best known for her 1961 hit At Last. She gained prominence following the success of All I Could Do Was Cry, At last, and Trust in Me. She won six Grammy Awards.

In the 1960’s, James developed addiction to heroin and later to cocaine in the 1970’s. Despite personal problems, James reinvented herself with the 1988 album Seven Year Itch. Actress Beyoncé Knowles played James in the film Cadillac Records in 2008.

James is survived by her husband Artis Mills, and her sons Donto and Sametto.



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November 25, 2010

English jury returns mix of verdicts in policeman\’s serial rape trial

English jury returns mix of verdicts in policeman’s serial rape trial

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Thursday, November 25, 2010

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A jury in Newcastle Crown Court, northeast England has cleared a police officer of some charges in a trial over serial rapes and related offences, and convicted him of others. Northumbria Police‘s Police Constable Stephen Mitchell faced five counts of rape, six of indecent assault and 15 of misconduct in public office. He is guilty of two rapes, three indecent assaults and six counts of misconduct, with most of the sex charge convictions coming yesterday.

In all the case involved 16 women aged from 17 to 48, all of whom were arrested on drugs charges or shoplifting thefts between 1999 and 2006; the prosecution said Mitchell picked his victims based on vulnerability. The prosecution claimed Mitchell used blackmail to demand sex in exchange for favours; Mitchell described a conspiracy to frame him involving “…a very small-knit community in Newcastle city centre’s criminal fraternity.” Mitchell’s defence dismissed the claims as driven by one woman motivated by “self-preservation;” he refused to explain this further in open court.

It was alleged he told one woman who wanted a female officer present when searched said “I am the law. I can do anything. I don’t need a woman here,” and later attacked her in his patrol car. The woman had been arrested for possession of drugs and was 37.

Cquote1.svg He threw me over the settee, I couldn’t move with the handcuffs on, I was petrified. He said this is what you’ve wanted for a long time and he raped me. Cquote2.svg

—Alleged victim testifies

“Each [victim] was vulnerable, whether because of drug abuse, health problems, domestic circumstances or a combination of these factors. The defendant took advantage of their vulnerabilities, usually providing or offering favours, but then requesting, or in some cases requiring by force, sexual favours in return,” was how prosecutor Paul Sloan QC explained the circumstances early in the trial.

Testimony in October included that of one lesbian, now 32, who in June 1999 was interviewed by the officer in Newcastle’s Pilgrim Street police station, and claimed he groped her and “that was the beginning of hell for me”. She told the court from behind a screen how he undid his trousers, saying that in arranging for her to be bailed he had helped her and he expected this reciprocated. “I was gay and had never had sex with a male,” but she claimed she was grabbed by the hair and forced, with a warning her girlfriend would be contacted if she made allegations. She had been arrested for cheque fraud.

She said the next month she was arrested again and he made a similar demand. Her testimony stated that he blackmailed her for four years, receiving regular sex after driving her into the country, culminating in a 2003 handcuffed rape at her home. She told the court he gave her drug money, as well as a lighter and foil to take heroin, after discovering she was in rehab. She says she pretended to take the drug but disposed of it, leaving rehab and beginning to study in 2002 in the belief the man had been evaded.

However, “[my] world just crumbled before me” when he arrived at her door and stole her spare keys, she said. She claimed he regularly visited her Sunderland house when she was away and once left a knife embedded in her pillow. She testified her fear made her sleep beneath her bed. Her testimony stated the policeman used what he said was video evidence of her committing fraud at a Post Office and in 2003 said he was going to hand the tape over.

She said when he arrived “[h]e was furious, he said I had disrespected him by not being in touch. I was trying to calm him down but he handcuffed me and said he was arresting me for fraud at the post office. He threw me over the settee, I couldn’t move with the handcuffs on, I was petrified. He said this is what you’ve wanted for a long time and he raped me.” She moved to Durham shortly after.

Detective Constable Cath Easton of Northumbria Police’s Professional Standards Unit said she visited one woman in June last year during the investigation. Although stating she had no problems with police treatment, Easton testified the woman called the following day. “She was crying, she was hysterical,” Easton told the court.

Cquote1.svg these people will grab any opportunity they can. They are lying Cquote2.svg

—Mitchell describes the women

“It took her a while to get her words out, but she was saying ‘how do I know I can trust you? How do I know he has not sent you to test us?’ She was frightened and she told us she was frightened. She was in a real state… She was absolutely terrified that he knew I had contacted her.”

The alleged victim was assured the investigation was genuine and later called again, claiming Mitchell forced her to perform a sex act following the former heroin addict’s arrest six years previously. Another woman told the court Mitchell raped her whilst in uniform in the woman’s flat, hands cuffed behind her, and blackmailed her for years demanding sexual favours.

One woman, 25 at the time, said while in Newcastle’s Pilgrim Street police station following her arrest for a minor offence she was grabbed and kissed by the policeman. “He put his hands on my shoulders and kissed me, it was a passionate kiss. The door was open and I was shocked, anyone could have walked past or seen him or anything.” She told the court this occurred in the fingerprint room.

“After I was photographed he told me he was finishing his shift, which I took to be a hint,” the witness, another former heroin addict who said she was drunk at the time, continued. “Then when I came out of the station PC Mitchell pulled up in a car and offered to take me home, it seemed the safest way of getting home was with a police officer.” She had no complaint about him during the journey but said she resisted another kiss upon arrival at her house.

The woman, who says she has not used drugs for nine years, stated that he arrived at her house the following day and gave her a second lift. “He said he had a wife and kids but that he would like to see me again. Obviously it was never going to happen but he was saying he wanted some kind of relationship where he was seeing me on a regular basis, I would imagine for sex or something like that. He said we would have to be discreet because he had a wife but I was not interested and eventually he accepted my ‘no’.”

Cquote1.svg What it means is: ‘Resign and this will go away’. Cquote2.svg

—The defence makes accusations against the officer in charge of probing Mitchell

She said he gave her money, suggested they get a private room and was “very persuasive”. Her mother also gave evidence to say Mitchell had called her to discuss the daughter’s drug-addict boyfriend. “You want to stop her going with him, he’s trouble, he’s a bad lad,” she claimed Mitchell said, adding her daughter told her the officer “was pestering her, she said he wanted to take her out.” The boyfriend also gave evidence, saying he had known the officer during former heroin addiction and giving a description of him.

One young mother met Mitchell when released from prison in 2001 after a theft sentence. Days later, he had given her heroin and felt she “owed him” according to testimony, receiving sex in return. She failed to attend Gateshead Magistrates’ Court in December the following year and he arrested her, she told the court. She wept, claiming he raped her in his vehicle. “I could not get out of the car, the doors were locked,” she told the trial.

“He said he wanted to have sex and that it would be the last time. I was shouting for him to let me out of the car, just screaming and shouting at him to let me go. He said if I told anybody, nobody would believe me because I was just a dirty junkie and I would never get my children back,” she said, describing him telling her he would plant drugs at her home and prevent access to her children if she made claims against him.

In November a woman in her fifties, who has four children and was 48 during her alleged attack, testified Mitchell raped her in a room used for reading reports at Pilgrim Street following her July 2006 theft arrest. “No one’s going to believe a thief,” he is claimed to have told her. “I said if you just let me go I’m not going to say anything; I’m not going to tell anyone. No one will ever know this has happened. I just wanted to be away.” She says she explained she was ill and taking cancer medication although “he did not seem bothered.”

Outside the police station following the alleged attack, “…there was two young lasses coming along. I will always remember one had a red Berghaus coat on. They seemed to know PC Mitchell and he did not seem to know whether to stay with me or talk to them and I just walked straight across the road. I was in total shock. I got on the bus home and I was trying to keep from crying and I had a pain in my throat.”

She said her life had been severely affected; “I was always thinking about it and crying for no reason. I just used to burst into tears for no reason and I’m not a crying person. I’m normally bubbly and happy and I really just let myself go. I never ever went with my partner again and from that day to this I have never slept with another man.” She triggered the probe that resulted in Mitchell’s prosecution by reporting him when, she says, he began arriving at her house.

She told Sloan she had not immediately contacted police because “I thought no-one would believe me. I was a shoplifter and he was a police officer. I still would never have been here to this day if he had not kept coming back to the house. If he had not done that it would have been a secret till the day I died.”

Mitchell, who has been a policeman since leaving the military in 1991, stated in the dock this month that the women had discussed their “host of rumours” amongst themselves and they were similar for this reason. “I think it has been demonstrated that people have been talking about this on a number of occasions… I know these people are not always truthful.” “But you are?” responded prosecution QC Paul Sloan. “Yes, these people will grab any opportunity they can,” according to the officer. “They are lying,” he later added.

Cquote1.svg He said if I told anybody, nobody would believe me because I was just a dirty junkie and I would never get my children back Cquote2.svg

—Testimony at trial

In an attempt to disprove this defence the prosecution produced a sex tape in which Mitchell uses similar phrases to his partner as the women alleged he had said to them. “So it just so happens the words used are exactly the words you used in the video?” Sloan inquired. PC Mitchell desribed this as coincidence and rejected claims he had used such words to any of the women. He also said supplying heroin to one addict was far too risky for him; “I know police monitor drug dealers’ homes and it would be a massive risk to take my vehicle to the address of a drug dealer. I don’t want people to be on drugs. If I could help them I would.”

Mitchell, 42, divorced in 2005, admitted meeting a woman he had met on duty for sex in 2006, having admitted the same at an internal misconduct hearing in September 2007. He told the court that if interviewing woman it was in his interests as an officer to be friendly, but insisted this was all.

Defended by Toby Hedworth QC, Mitchell said his father’s murder meant he could not possibly have committed one rape in Burdon, near Sunderland, on August 31, 2001 as he had returned to his original home city of Glasgow following his father’s murder. He was accused of raping the woman in a parked car in a field.

“Have you ever been with her in the fields in the Burdon area of Sunderland?” asked Hedworth. “No, I haven’t. My dad was attacked on July 30, 2001 by somebody and subsequently died on August 10, 2001.” Hedworth: “Had your father in fact been murdered?” Mitchell: “Yes. And from the 9th to the 16th of August I was in Glasgow,” he explained. Hedworth took him through denials of every charge, which he said there was “no truth whatsoever” in.

The defence also produced a recording secretly recorded by Mitchell with Detective Chief Inspector Chris Sharman, who headed the rape investigation. Hedworth told the court Mitchell is warned on the tape, made in March, that if he is charged he would “probably be front page of the national newspapers and they are horrible” but the team would “stop digging” if he stepped down.

Hedworth likened the offer to a Monopoly “get out of jail free card” and claimed despite a warning his client was “running the risk of going to jail and going on the sex offender register”, Mitchell chose to fight the allegations – a fact which demonstrated innocence. “What it means is: ‘Resign and this will go away’.” The prosecution denied Northumbria Police were seeking to offer their colleague an alternative to investigation, stating the allegation – made during Hedworth’s closing speech – was untrue and the recording did not indicate an offer to drop the probe.

The jury began deliberations on Wednesday. After three days, on Friday they cleared Mitchell of three rapes, two indecent assaults and two counts of misconduct in a public office. Following this, trial judge Mr Justice Wilkie said he would accept majority verdicts on the remaining charges, instead of unanimous verdicts. The jury departed for the weekend, returning on Tuesday to convict him of six misconduct charges and clear him of the same number; another indecent assault charge also produced an acquital.

Yesterday, the verdicts were delivered on the remaining charges. The remaining seven misconduct charges were acquitals, as did the other indecent assaults. Two charges of rape and three of indecent assault produced guilty verdicts.

At least one of the misconduct charges he was convicted of was unrelated to indecent assault or rape; it concerned a drug-addicted woman caught with non-prescriped diazepam (valium) when her friend was arrested for shoplifting in 2003. Her testimony was that he stroked her leg and tried to kiss her in Pilgrim Street, returned the drugs upon her release, obtained her number and met her several times to give her drugs. She says although he asked to go at night to a hotel she refused, and ultimately she began ignoring his calls while he ceased supplying drugs.

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  • “English policeman accused of being serial rapist” — Wikinews, January 22, 2010

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September 22, 2010

Former Ecuadorian football referee Byron Moreno arrested for drug smuggling

Former Ecuadorian football referee Byron Moreno arrested for drug smuggling

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Wednesday, September 22, 2010

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Moreno was arrested at John F. Kennedy International Airport

Byron Moreno, a former Ecuadorian football referee who officiated at the 2002 FIFA World Cup, has been arrested for suspected drug smuggling. Moreno was arrested at John F. Kennedy International airport after he arrived on a flight from Ecuador.

During a routine check, security found 10 clear bags containing nearly 10 pounds of heroin. The drugs had been strapped to his body and concealed in his underwear. In a complaint filed in a Brooklyn federal court it said that during the inspection Moreno “became visibly nervous.” It also said “A customs agent felt hard objects on the defendant’s stomach, back and both of his legs. A strip search revealed that the lumps were 10 clear plastic bags containing more than 10 pounds of heroin”.

A judge jailed Moreno without bail on charges of drug smuggling.

Moreno is most well remembered after he refereed the World Cup second round match between Italy and host’s South Korea. Moreno had disallowed a valid Italian goal and sent off Italian striker Francesco Totti for apparent diving. He also failed to call any attention to any of the South Korean’s foul play. Moreno resigned from refereeing in 2003.



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January 21, 2010

UK woman convicted of \’mercy\’ murder of son

UK woman convicted of ‘mercy’ murder of son

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Thursday, January 21, 2010

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A woman has been convicted of murder after killing her son in an “act of mercy”. The Old Bailey, a London court, heard that Frances Inglis, 57, injected Tom, 22, with heroin and gave her a life sentence.

Old Bailey
Image: Nevilley.

Tom had been injured in a street fight in July 2007 and was put in an ambulance depite his desire not to be hospitalised. The ambulance door was opened three times; the third time Tom jumped out and sustained injuries that left him in a coma. He became mute and dependant on 24-hour care. His only method of communication was to squeeze a hand.

Frances was told that if she wanted Tom to die legally then she could ask the High Court to allow his food and water to be withdrawn, so that he would starve to death. Frances told the court “I know Tom – no way would he have wanted to live totally dependent. I can remember saying I felt I would rather he go to heaven than to hell on earth. I know Tom would not want to live. He had lost his life.”

“I couldn’t bear the thought of Tom dying of thirst or hunger,” she said of the idea of food and water withdrawal. “To me that would be so cruel, so cruel. To die slowly like that would be horrible.” Instead she used the Internet to research Tom’s condition and concluded that a heroin overdose would be the most painless method available. A learning disabilities worker with no convictions, she concluded two grams was sufficient to kill and began spending time in areas she believed drugs were on sale – outside the local station, job centre and needle exchanges.

Frances was determined to release Tom from his “living hell” and said she had “no choice” in the matter. “I asked myself what I would want,” she said. “I would want someone to love me enough to help me die. That’s why I thought heroin – a painless, peaceful death.” She obtained her two grams and stole syringes from Tom’s hospital before injecting him, but he was revived by nurses and she was charged with attempted murder. She was bailed but barred from contacting her son.

Fourteen months later she obtained access to Tom by posing as his aunt and placed superglue in the lock of his door, further barricading it with an oxygen cylinder and a wheelchair. It took staff thirty minutes to break in, by which time Frances had injected one of Tom’s arms and both his thighs with heroin. This time he died.

Frances had left a letter to her family in which she talked of her concerns for her other two sons and dog, as well as the running of the house, expecting a murder arrest. On one bed she left a photograph of Tom as well as a prayer written by his girlfriend. Police also found older letter by Frances, one of which read “People keep saying Tom is not suffering. How can they know how he feels?”

She was asked if guilty of murder and attempted murder, to which she responded “I don’t see it as killing or murder. The definition of murder is to take someone’s life with malice in your heart. I did it with love in my heart, for Tom, so I don’t see it as murder. I knew what I was doing was against the law. I don’t know what name they would call it but I knew that the law would say it was wrong. I believed it would have been Tom’s choice to have been allowed to die rather than have the intervention to keep him alive.”

The jury “could not have had a more difficult case,” according to Judge Brian Barker, but he told them nobody was allowed to override the law. Ten members of the jury agreed, but two sided with Frances, leaving a conviction by majority verdict. The jury foreman was greeted by cries of “shame on you” from France’s relatives, for which they were ejected from the building. “We can all understand the emotion and the unhappiness that you were experiencing,” Barker told Frances, later adding “You knew you were breaking society’s conventions, you knew you were breaking the law, and you knew the consequences.” He ordered her to serve a minimum of nine years.

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“What this case and a number of others have exposed,” said France’s eldest son, Alex, “is a need for a complete rethink of existing laws in regard to people that have been, and will be, in the same position as Tom. How can it be legal to withhold food and water, which means a slow and painful death, yet illegal to end all suffering in a quick, calm and loving way? It’s cruel, inhumane and illogical… We have a duty of care to them and we should not allow this situation to continue. It should not be left to a wife, husband, mother, father, sister or brother to have to end their suffering, and be convicted for murder.” Detective Chief Inspector Steve Collin, who was in charge of the case, flatly disagreed. “There’s no such thing as a mercy killing in law.”

“I want to say that all of the family and Tom’s girlfriend support my mum 100%. All those who loved and were close to Tom have never seen this as murder, but as a loving and courageous act,” said Alex.



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September 19, 2009

UK seizes drugs worth £25 million in new record

UK seizes drugs worth £25 million in new record

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Saturday, September 19, 2009

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File photo: Heroin powder

The United Kingdom’s Border Agency has seized drugs worth £25 million (US$ 40.6 million) after heroin was discovered in a shipment from South Africa.

The discovery was made during an inspection of souvenirs shipped into London’s Heathrow Airport, where 165 kg of the drug was recovered. The Serious Organised Crime Agency raided a house in Maidstone, Kent, where a further 80 kg of heroin was discovered. A additional search brought the total to 360 kg, as well as 6,500 kg of herbal cannabis and resin. This includes drugs recovered in Durban, South Africa.

Three of those arrested in South Africa are from the UK and it is thought all of the drugs were for the domestic UK market. One of those arrested in the UK has been charged with possession of heroin with intent to supply.

The heroin was first discovered last week but the events have only now been publicised, as authorities were fearful that earlier revelations would damage their investigation. Five people in South Africa and two in the UK have been arrested. Heroin is a Class A drug in the UK.



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April 30, 2009

Mexico on path to decriminalize personal possession of drugs

Mexico on path to decriminalize personal possession of drugs

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Thursday, April 30, 2009

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On Tuesday, April 28, the Senate of Mexico approved a bill that would decriminalize the possession of small quantities of psychoactive drugs for personal use, including marijuana and cocaine. The proposed law has the support of President Felipe Calderón. It awaits approval by the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of Mexico’s legislature.

The tribune of the Mexican Senate.
Image: Senado de la República (Mexican Senate).

The bill, which passed with 87 votes and 10 abstentions, would make it legal to carry quantities up to 5 grams of marijuana, 500 milligrams of cocaine, 50 milligrams of heroin, or 40 milligrams of methamphetamines for personal use. Those found with greater quantities or convicted of the intent to distribute or sell any quantity of the specified drugs face a sentence of 5–15 years of prison.

The Mexican Congress passed a similar bill in 2006, but it was vetoed by then-president Vicente Fox under pressure from the administration of former United States president George W. Bush.

The 2009 bill would authorize local authorities to investigate drug trafficking. Previously, the classification of drug trafficking as a federal offense prevented local authorities from enforcing drug laws and made it difficult to convict drug dealers: Mexico’s federal courts are overwhelmed by bigger cases.

The bill would also offer voluntary treatment to drug addicts. Those detained three times for drug possession would be sent to a rehabilitation center for mandatory treatment.



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September 7, 2006

Four more members of the Bali Nine to face death penalty

Four more members of the Bali Nine to face death penalty

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Thursday, September 7, 2006

An additional four members of the Bali Nine, convicted of smuggling heroin into Indonesia will face the death penalty. In all, six of the drug smugglers are sentenced to death by firing squad. The Bali Nine is the name given to nine Australian citizens arrested in Indonesia in early 2005.

Zarof Ricar from Jakarta’s Supreme Court has confirmed that the previous 20 year sentences given to Tan Duc Thanh Nguyen, Si Yi Chen, Matthew Norman and Scott Rush had been changed to death by firing squad after an appeal by prosecutors. Bali Nine members Andrew Chan and Myran Sukumaran had previous been the only members of the group to be given the death penalty.

Ricar’s confirmation ends a day of speculation about the fate of the men. The Australian government is still seeking official confirmation about the decision, believed to have been made on August 16.

Relatives of the Bali Nine have again attacked the Australian Federal Police for passing intelligence to Indonesian officials which led to their arrest. Australian Justice Minister Chris Ellison denies any inappropriate actions by the AFP and says authorities merely cooperated with Indonesia.

Macquarie National News’s Indonesian correspondent Sujadi Siswo said it was not unusual for Supreme Court decisions to be kept secret in Indonesia.

“It’s not the procedure for the Supreme Court to make public their results, so what’s happened is one of the lawyers of the defendants has informed the media,” he said.

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April 29, 2006

Mexico on the verge of decriminalizing possession of small amounts of drugs

Filed under: AutoArchived,Cannabis,Cocaine,Drugs,Health,Heroin,Mexico — admin @ 5:00 am

Mexico on the verge of decriminalizing possession of small amounts of drugs

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Saturday, April 29, 2006

The Congress of Mexico has passed a bill that will decriminalize the possession of small amounts of drugs for personal use. The passage of the bill has drawn criticism from Washington, D.C.

Under the law possession of up to five grams of marijuana, half a gram of cocaine (or about 4 lines) or 25 milligrams of heroin would no longer be a crime in Mexico. In addition, possession of small amounts of LSD, MDA, ecstasy, and methamphetamine would also be legalized, officials said.

Current Mexican drug possession law allows charges to be dropped against defendants if they can prove that they are addicts and if the amount is the quantity necessary for personal use. The new law reportedly removes the “addict” requirement and sets specific legal quantities

President Vicente Fox is expected to sign the bill. According to President Fox’s spokesman, Ruben Aguilar, “This law gives police and prosecutors better legal tools to combat drug crimes that do so much damage to our youth and children.”

San Diego Mayor and former police chief Jerry Sanders seems to disagree, calling the legislation “appallingly stupid, reckless and incredibly dangerous.”

“If enacted, even the most reasonable person will have room to question Mexico’s commitment to the war on drugs,” he said. “I think many, including myself, will view this as a hostile action by a longtime ally to the United States.”

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References

  1. Articulo 524” — Instituto de Investigaciones Jurídicas de la UNAM, 30 de marzo de 2006 (March 20, 2006)
  2. Articulo 199” — Instituto de Investigaciones Jurídicas de la UNAM, 30 de marzo de 2006 (March 20, 2006)
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February 15, 2006

Last three Bali Nine smugglers jailed for life

Last three Bali Nine smugglers jailed for life

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Wednesday, February 15, 2006

The remaining three members of the Bali Nine have been sentenced to life in prison by a Denpasar court. Matthew Norman, 19, Si Yi Chen, 20, and Tan Duc Thanh Nguyen, aged 27 were found guilty of exporting narcotics. The court found that the heroin they had been caught with was the same as that found strapped to the bodies of the four others arrested at Denpasar airport.

The Australian Federal Police have been criticised for allowing the Bali Nine to travel to Indonesia, where it was known they could face the death penalty. All nine have now been found guilty and sentenced, with seven receiving life in prison, and the two ringleaders being sentenced to death yesterday.

Verdicts

  • Renae Lawrence – Life in prison
  • Scott Rush – Life in prison
  • Michael Czugaj – Life in prison
  • Martin Stephens – Life in prison
  • Matthew Norman – Life in prison
  • Si Yi Chen – Life in prison
  • Tan Duc Thanh Nguyen – Life in prison
  • Andrew Chan – Death
  • Myuran Sukumaran – Death

All verdicts are consistent with the recommendations of the Indonesian prosecutors, except for Renae Lawrence. In her case prosecutors requested 20 years imprisonment.

Related Wikinews

Sources

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