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June 8, 2005

California IT company to create 100 new jobs in Dublin

California IT company to create 100 new jobs in Dublin

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Wednesday, June 8, 2005

California based QLogic Corporation has announced that it is to establish its EMEA (Europe, Middle East and Africa) headquarters in County Dublin, Ireland. The new centre will be based in a 20,000-square-foot facility in Blanchardstown. Up to 100 people will be employed there within five years time.

QLogic manufactures many important components that are used in servers, PC’s and various networking products by companies such as Dell, Cisco, and HP.

The CEO of QLogic, Mr. H. K. Desai, said of the companies decision to locate in Ireland “We chose Dublin as we believe it will best service our long-term needs, enable us to recruit the calibre of people we require and facilitate the timely delivery of product to our customers overseas.”

Ireland has continued to attract large amounts of FDI in recent years despite the slowdown in the world economy in 2002. Recent additions to Ireland’s list of multinationals include Amazon.com, eBay, Bell Labs and Yahoo.

Sources

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May 7, 2005

Reactions to Apple\’s OS X Tiger

Reactions to Apple’s OS X Tiger – Wikinews, the free news source

Reactions to Apple’s OS X Tiger

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Saturday, May 7, 2005

In chatrooms and on bulletin boards, Macintosh users and the Macintosh-curious are buzzing about Tiger, the newest version of Apple Computer’s Mac OS X, version 10.4. The open-source kernel, or base of the system, “Darwin”, plus all the features of Apple’s proprietary Quartz user interface features, software, and system utilities have passed through their next phase of upgrading and scrutiny, and have been shipping for more than a week now.

Apple reports that Tiger, the code name for this release, includes over 200 new features and new versions of application software such as e-mail client Mail, web browser Safari, and multi-person audio/video/text messaging client iChat. Entirely new features have also been rolled out in this release:

  • Spotlight integrates search in the core of the OS, and utilizes meta-data in its algorithm.
  • Dashboard provides a sandbox for widgets, handy mini-applicatios like a calculator, sticky notes, and a dictionary, made available at the stroke of a key.
  • Automator, a graphical scripting interface that enables non-programmers to automate repetitive tasks.

One user of the new operating system made this comment:

IRC chat snippet:
    Amgine  so... how is it?       pHatidic  It's like being in the future.   

Industry analysts have pointed to both the advances and the failures of the new version already. Many of the bigger technology advances have gained high praise, but, they point out, Microsoft Longhorn is also expected to have many of these advantages when it is released, expected in late 2006. And inter-operability, long a strength of Macintosh to work with other operating systems and networks, has had a few bugs—such as reports of issues with Server Message Block (SMB) and Active Directory. Another issue for some is the fact that Cisco System’s VPN does not work with Tiger. Cisco has promised a compatible release before the end of the month.

The biggest technology breakthrough is Spotlight. Using meta-data, searches are fast and easy and very thorough, and the results of the search can be used over and over again and will automatically update and change as you use your system. Search queries on a user’s data can be saved as “Smart folders” without ever moving files on the hard drive, so you can collect all your photos, receipts, and webpages about your summer vacation, for example, while still keeping things ordered on your hard drive. According to a review by PC World, this alone is worth the US$129.

Still, even Macintosh support sites such as Mac News suggest waiting for the first “point” release (10.4.1) before jumping in, which is expected in late May. Apple Computer has been on a semi-regular release pattern since moving to Mac OS X, with four versions released in 5 years. This constant development program has occasionally been accused of being aimed at forcing users to constantly pay out for expensive new software, but the returns of regular releases have been quick bug fixes and leading edge technology.

Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 7, 2005

Ethiopia plans to expand country\’s Internet access

Ethiopia plans to expand country’s Internet access

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Thursday, April 7, 2005

Map of Ethiopia

At an information technology conference in Addis Ababa, Prime Minister Meles Zenawi of Ethiopia vowed to offer universal Internet connectivity in the country within three years. The government is working with a United States technology company Cisco Systems to fulfill this promise.

The government will invest US$40 million in the venture, which will lay nearly 10,000 km of fibre optic cable. Ethiopia currently ranks low in Internet penetration, with just 30,000 connections available for its 71 million inhabitants. Part of the program is the installation of Internet access at 450 secondary schools throughout the country.

Zenawi explained the change of heart that led to the decision to invest in this infrastructure project. “Not long ago many of us felt that we were too poor to seriously invest in information and communication technology,” he said at the conference. “We were convinced that we should invest every penny we have on securing the next meal for our people. We did not believe serious investment in ICT had anything to do with facing the challenges of poverty that kills. Now I think we know better,” he explained to the delegates.

Not everyone thinks that the government knows better. Giovani Peri, Assistant Professor of Economics at University of California, Davis, specializes in macroeconomics and growth theory. Peri believes that the Ethiopian government may be misguided in its direct investment in the build-up of information technology, and should instead create incentives for the private sector to build such infrastructure.

Professor Peri likened the Internet access project to previous failed attempts by African governments to stimulate growth via large-scale projects. “[African governments] in the past tried to build airports … in the middle of desolation.” — but people need to know that the environment is right for business, he said, not just a good airport. He said that the investment in Internet access might be too early for that country, and that before it is built, the country needs a good educational system to get the scientific community involved in the process of building technology infrastructure.

Ethiopia’s population is mostly rural, and over half of the population is illiterate. The country’s GDP per capita is US$560.

Sources

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