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April 13, 2012

First Algerian president Ahmed Ben Bella dies aged 95

First Algerian president Ahmed Ben Bella dies aged 95

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Friday, April 13, 2012

A 60s file photo of Ben Bella

Ahmed Ben Bella, the first president of Algeria, died on Wednesday. He was 95.

Known for his struggle against French rule, Ben Bella led the nation from 1963 to 1965 having only learned Arabic during a prison sentence. He came from a poor, agricultural background and left school early, but it was during his schooldays he joined Messali Hadj‘s Algerian People’s Party.

Serving in World War II, Ben Bella was decorated with five medals for actions including conflict at the 1944 Battle of Monte Cassino in Italy and shooting down a German aircraft over Marseille, France. After the war he was elected to seniority within a group dedicated to ending French rule.

The movement was deemed illegal and Ben Bella escaped and fled two years after his 1951 arrest for his part in a fundraising robbery. He became a fugitive in Cairo. In 1956 he was re-arrested and imprisoned. A bloody conflict for Algerian independence eventually convinced France to relinquish control in 1962 and Ben Bella was freed. The following year he took control of a one-party nation.

Within years of attaining power, defence minister Houari Boumediene, an ally of current president Abdelaziz Bouteflika, overthrew Ben Bella in a coup. Ben Bella had grappled with post-war consolidation after about 1.5 million French left the nation, leaving gaps in its economy.

Ben Bella died at his Algiers home whilst asleep. He had been receiving hospital treatment for breathing problems. “Today we lost one of modern Algeria’s bravest leaders,” said Bouteflika, declaring eight days of mourning. Successive regimes detained Ben Bella first in prison and later his home from his deposition to 1980 when he left for Switzerland in exile, before being pardoned a decade later. He married journalist Zohra Sellami in 1971.



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February 13, 2011

Algiers protest takes place despite ban

Algiers protest takes place despite ban – Wikinews, the free news source

Algiers protest takes place despite ban

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Algeria
Other stories from Algeria
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…More articles here
Location of Algeria

A map showing the location of Algeria

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Algeria, see the Algeria Portal
Flag of Algeria.svg

Sunday, February 13, 2011

A planned pro-democracy protest took place Saturday in Algiers, the capital of Algeria, despite a standing government ban on protests in the capital. Massive police presence reduced the event from its planned scope, and dispersed it after a few hours, but did not prevent it.

The demonstration, planned for some time, was to be a march through Algiers, from May First Square, about five kilometers (three miles) to Martyrs Square. Instead, protesters demonstrated in May First Square for a few hours.

Algeria has been officially in a state of emergency for nineteen years. Early this month, following recent pro-democracy events in Tunisia and Egypt, Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika said the state of emergency will be lifted “soon”. At the same time he also said marches would be allowed everywhere in the country except in Algiers. Leading up to this protest, riot police closed all entrances both to Algiers and to May First Square.

The number of demonstrators who gathered in May First Square despite the police cordons was estimated by officials at 1500, and by demonstration organizers at around 10,000. The number of riot police in the city — with body armor, armored vehicles, and water cannons — was anticipated by officials as high as 30,000, and estimated by organizers as high as 26,000.

The protest was organized by the National Co-ordination for Change and Democracy (CNCD), an umbrella group of Algerian organizations formed in late January. Protesters demanded democratic freedoms, an end to government corruption, and relief from economic hardships. Some protesters called for removal of President Bouteflika, although that was not a stated goal of the organizers.

Several hundred protesters were arrested, at least briefly. Algerian activist Elias Felali, who blogged from within the demonstration, claimed the police wanted to provoke violence, but the protesters were pointedly non-violent.



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October 22, 2009

Demonstrators clash with police in Algeria after slum protest

Demonstrators clash with police in Algeria after slum protest

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Thursday, October 22, 2009

Algeria
Other stories from Algeria
  • 5 January 2015: French campaigning film director René Vautier dies
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 1 February 2013: British Prime Minister David Cameron makes unannounced visit to Libya
  • 24 January 2013: ‘Imminent threat’ as Foreign Office urges Britons to leave Benghazi
…More articles here
Location of Algeria

A map showing the location of Algeria

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Algeria, see the Algeria Portal
Flag of Algeria.svg

Demonstrators and police clashed on Wednesday in Algiers, Algeria, after the residents of a slum district in the city took to the streets to demonstrate against housing and job shortages.

Coast of Algiers, Algeria (2005)
Image: Damien Boilley.

The protest, led by residents of the Diar Echams area of the Algerian capital, conflicted with security forces after starting a protest late on Wednesday. Police officials said at least eleven officers were injured in the violence, but they have not released a civilian casualty figure.

400 or so policemen, equipped with riot gear and an armoured vehicle, tried to break up the protests. Demonstrators hurled petrol bombs, stones, and other heavy objects at police.



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June 18, 2009

Militants kill at least 21 Algerian police in ambush

Militants kill at least 21 Algerian police in ambush

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Thursday, June 18, 2009

Algeria
Other stories from Algeria
…More articles here
Location of Algeria

A map showing the location of Algeria

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Algeria, see the Algeria Portal
Flag of Algeria.svg

Local media stated on Thursday that at least 21 Algerian paramilitary police had been killed after an ambush on their convoy.

The convoy was en route to their barracks at Bordj Bou Arreridj, following an escort of Chinese construction workers to a nearby worksite, located southeast of Algeria’s capital of Algiers, when it was attacked late Wednesday.

Militants detonated no less than two roadside bombs to block the convoy, consisting of six vehicles. They then opened fire on the police before stealing their uniforms, weapons, and vehicles. The militants, as part of Al-Qaeda’s network, are referred to as al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, (AQIM).

Newspaper reports indicated that 21 people had died, while a local official said 23 were killed and a further five had been hospitalized.

A large security operation has started in the area; however, the attack was not immediately confirmed by Algerian authorities.

The militants have been left over from a civil war begun in 1992 between the government and radical Islamists that has killed between 150,000 and 200,000 people. Violence has since diminished, but attacks on government forces still occur.



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December 20, 2007

France holds five suspects in Algiers bombing

France holds five suspects in Algiers bombing

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Thursday, December 20, 2007

Location of Algiers within Algeria.

French police have today confirmed that they are holding five suspects in the December 11 Algiers bombings. The bombings killed at least 37 people, including 17 United Nations staff members.

The men were arrested with three others, who have since been freed, in a raids on Tuesday in Paris and Rouen. They are believed to be part of the support network for Al-Qaeda Organization in the Islamic Maghreb (formerly Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat), which has claimed responsibility for the attack.



Related news

  • “Two car bombs kill scores in Algiers, Algeria” — Wikinews, December 11, 2007
  • “Terrorist attacks in Algiers, Algeria kill 23 people and wound 162” — Wikinews, April 11, 2007

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December 11, 2007

Two car bombs kill scores in Algiers, Algeria

Two car bombs kill scores in Algiers, Algeria

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Tuesday, December 11, 2007

Location of Algeria

Two bombs have exploded in Algiers, the capital of Algeria, killing at least 67 people. Both explosions were car bombs, at least one of which is being called a suicide bombing.

The first explosion took place in the Ben Aknoun district in the center of the city, which is near the constitutional court. The second was near the United Nations offices in the Hydra neighborhood. A UN worker said to the BBC that the building has partially collapsed and people may be trapped inside.

Jean Fabre, of the United Nations Development Programme, said that 10 staff members had been killed by the bomb which was outside the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees‘s offices.

Several of the victims in the Ben Aknoun attack were students who were in a passing bus.

Officials believe that the attacks were carried out by The al-Qaeda Organization in the Islamic Maghreb, which was previously known as the Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat and sometimes still referred to as such.

Cquote1.svg I would like to condemn it in the strongest terms – it cannot be justified in any circumstances Cquote2.svg

—UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon

Algiers suffered a similar attack on April 11 of this year when two suicide car bombers claimed the lives of 33 people. According to Reuters, some people in Algeria have begun to speculate that the attacks on the 11th of the month is an homage to the September 11 against the United States.

Anis Rahmani, security expert and editor of a local paper, told Reuters that “al Qaeda wanted to send a strong message that it is still capable despite the lost of several top leaders. Now the key problem is that social conditions are still offering chances for terrorists to hire new rebels.”

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon condemned the attacks while in Indonesia for the 2007 United Nations Climate Change Conference: “This is just unacceptable. I would like to condemn it in the strongest terms. It cannot be justified in any circumstances.”

Nicolas Sarkozy, the President of France, who recently visited Algeria, called the attacks “barbaric, hateful and deeply cowardly acts.”

“President Sarkozy has just called President Bouteflika to express the French people’s solidarity and compassion towards the Algerian people,” said presidential spokesperson David Martinon.

White House spokesperson Gordon Johndroe said: “The United States stands with the people of Algeria, as well as the United Nations, as they deal with this senseless violence.”

The Algerian Prime Minister Abdelaziz Belkhadem called off a cabinet meeting to allow him to visit the injured in the hospital.



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11 December 2007 Algiers bombings
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April 11, 2007

Terrorist attacks in Algiers, Algeria kill 23 people and wound 162

Terrorist attacks in Algiers, Algeria kill 23 people and wound 162

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Wednesday, April 11, 2007

Algiers at night

This morning, Algiers, the capital of Algeria, was targeted by two deadly terrorist bombings. The first target was the Government Palace, the main offices of the government, located in downtown Algiers, killing 12 people and wounding 118, according to civil defense. Several cars were burned out, while the Government Palace sustained some heavy damage, as well as the rest of the neighborhood. The other target was the police station of Bab Ezzouar, east of Algiers, causing the death of 11 people and wounding 44 others. Civil defense authorities and witnesses say that these bombings were carried out by suicide bombers.

In an Internet statement, responsibility for the attacks was claimed by {{w|Al-Qaeda group in the Maghreb]], known formerly as the Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat, renamed in January 2007 to indicate affiliation with al Qaeda. The website with the claim showed photos of the purported bombers, identified as Muadh bin Jabal, al-Zubair Abu Sajda, and Abu Dajjana.

This attack follows a series of smaller-scale bombings that took place in December 2006 and March 2007.

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2007 Algiers bombings
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