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April 29, 2006

U.S. Web host target of denial-of-service attack

U.S. Web host target of denial-of-service attack

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Saturday, April 29, 2006

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The servers of a U.S. Web hosting company that hosts several high-profile weblogs was the target of several denial of service attacks (DoS) on Friday.

Hosting Matters, a Web host located in Jacksonville, Florida, experienced an abnormal surge in Internet traffic at approximately 10:00 a.m. EDT (1400 UTC). Upstream providers confirmed shortly afterward that one of their servers was the target of a massive denial-of-service attack.

System administrators took steps to isolate the target server from the network. Partial recovery was achieved and minor disruptions were reported after 12 noon EDT. [1]

The host suffered another attack around 8:30 p.m. EDT, which was resolved shortly before 9:30 p.m. [2]

Glenn Reynolds, whose popular Instapundit blog was one of the sites affected, reports that the attack appears to have originated from computers in Saudi Arabia, though it is not clear whether the perpetrators were also located there. [3] On its emergency operation forum, Hosting Matters would not elaborate as to the target or likely source of the attack, except that it appears to have come from outside U.S. borders. One of their administrators, known only as “Stacy,” said, “I sincerely doubt that country’s leadership has the least bit of concern for extraditing over something like this.” [4]

It is believed, but not confirmed, that the target of the attack was aarons.cc, a weblog that had apparently been hacked in the past. At the time of this writing, the site is still down. Hosting Matters has stated that the target site would not be brought back online in order to avoid further problems.

Hosting Matters hosts several high-traffic blogs, many of which, like Instapundit and Power Line, are generally supportive of the policies of President George W. Bush.

Syndicated columnist Michelle Malkin commented on her weblog, “We are all affected by cyberterrorist tactics, wherever they may originate.” [5]

David Allyn of Grouchy’s Liberaltopia, one of the few blogs critical of Bush hosted on Hosting Matters and found via Technorati, commented, “Hopefully, they have isolated the fucknozzles that have been attacking the servers. I can only hope that whoever is doing this DoS attack dies a horrible death that is dragged out for hours.” [6]

Sources

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March 2, 2006

Amateur sex video stirs controversy on Internet

Amateur sex video stirs controversy on Internet

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Thursday, March 2, 2006

An amateur sex video allegedly filmed in Singapore using a mobile phone has become an Internet phenomenon. Various blogs are reporting that tens of thousands of Internet users are searching for the video, creating what bloggers call a “blogstorm”. According to unconfirmed reports, the female in the video is “Tammy”, a 17 year old student at Nanyang Polytechnic (NYP) in Singapore, and the male is her 21 year old boyfriend. The incident has stirred controversy, with many bloggers critical of the interest the video has attracted.

Terms such as “tammy nyp” and “tammy video” topped the list of search terms on Technorati, a blog search engine, for days. Bloggers appear to be creating entries containing the terms to increase hits to their blogs. Domain names such as nyptammy.com have been registered, in an attempt to make money through advertising. Further, The Malaysian Star (A major newspaper in a neighbouring country, Malaysia) reported last week that a DVD version of the clips is available for sale on the streets of Penang.

It has been reported in the Singapore press that the female student in the video is currently undergoing counselling. The student has also lodged a complaint with the police, who are currently investigating the matter.

While it is unlikely that the culprits who uploaded the video will ever be caught, a warning must be sounded to people seeking to exploit this unfortunate incident. Under Singapore Law, bloggers who intentionally spread the “Tammy videos” are liable in tort to “Tammy”.

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April 1, 2005

Harvard hosts conference on technological future of news media

Filed under: Archived,Politics and conflicts,Technorati,United States — admin @ 5:00 am

Harvard hosts conference on technological future of news media

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Friday, April 1, 2005

Harvard University recently hosted a symposium called “Whose News? Media, Technology and the Common Good” at its Nieman Foundation for Journalism. Held March 3-4 and providing a certain amount of video to be rebroadcast through the web, the event was widely commented on by both bloggers and traditional media.

Among the participants was Richard Sambrook, Director of the BBC World Service and Global News Division, which has taken on the challenge of incorporating the voices of citizen journalists into their news gathering and presentation process. At what he calls the “community level”, the BBC is engaging a project called “Digital Storytelling” in which they are assisting and working with individuals in the recording and production of videos that “document their lives and report and cull things of importance to them”, which the BBC has then distributed by a variety of means. They are also encouraging participation in issues of citizen concern at the national and international levels.

Some participants such as co-creator of the seminar, Matt Thompson expressed concern over the growing centralization of the ownership of mainstream news media in the hands of a few corporate sponsors, at the same time it incorporates these growing sources of audience information. “I think that people are looking forward to a media that can truly respond to them, even if the…corporate centralization aspects of it in this giant ‘Googlezon’ entity give many people pause” quoting a MetaFilter.com thread to the effect, “I for one welcome our new Googlezon overlords.”

There was some discussion of the traditional media and its engagement with recent issues of national importance. “I think there’s been a massive media failure across the board…there’s been an institutional failure.”, said MediaChannel Executive Editor Danny Schechter in discussing his film, “WMD: Weapons of Mass Distortion”. He suggested two basic fixes including “more diversity of perspective…let’s have a real debate and discussion” and “don’t take everything at face value and check facts and look at perspectives from other countries.” He decried what he called “groupthink” in American media and called for “more feisty independent journalists, and more watchdog, less lapdog.”

However, some other critics have elsewhere expressed concerns about the actual independence and diversity of webloggers and other non-traditional media as an antidote to perceived media bias. For example, there is often a perceived lack of race or sex diversity among top bloggers. Steven Levy, a senior editor of Newsweek, has recently written a column addressing concerns about the over-representation of white males among top bloggers on the Internet. Technorati.com, a website which describes itself as “the authority on what is happening on the real-time web”, maintains a list of the top 100 blogs that was used as the basis for his column. However, others such as Heather Mac Donald at National Review have pointed out that there are no actual barriers to participation to anyone who wishes to engage in blogging, and so such imbalances in representation are probably not the result of personal bias.

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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