Wiki Actu en

September 21, 2013

Bolivian president announces legal action over Obama\’s \’crimes against humanity\’

Bolivian president announces legal action over Obama’s ‘crimes against humanity’

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Correction — October 4, 2013
 
The last paragraph of this article should say “President Maduro” rather than “President Morales”. We apologize for the error.
 

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Crime and law
Related articles
  • 29 June 2015: Dozens dead in Mumbai after consuming toxic alcohol
  • 11 June 2015: 16-year-old girl charged with attempted murder in Melbourne, Australia
  • 30 May 2015: Non-parole period extended to 43 years for Australian rapist and murderer
  • 28 May 2015: Western Australia police close in on murder suspect, arrest warrant issued
  • 21 May 2015: Yingluck Shinawatra, former Thai prime minster, begins her trial in Bangkok over corruption allegations

Crime and law
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The Bolivian President Evo Morales announced Thursday he will file legal charges against the United States President Barack Obama for crimes against humanity. President Morales announced he was preparing litigation after Venezuelan President Nicholas Maduro‘s plane was allegedly denied entry into U.S. airspace over Puerto Rico.

File photo of Evo Morales.
Image: Agência Brasil.

Official portrait of Barack Obama.
Image: Pete Souza.

President Morales called Obama a “criminal” violating international law. Morales called an emergency meeting of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), made up of 33 member states including Argentina, Mexico and Chile, and encouraged member states to remove their ambassadors from the U.S. to show their solidarity. He asked Bolivarian Alliance member states to boycott the next United Nations meeting, to be held in New York on September 24. He also said the U.S. had pursued a policy of “intimidation” and have a history of blockading presidential flights.

In July this year, the Bolivian presidential aircraft was prevented from landing in Portugal to refuel, allegedly at the request of the U.S. administration. After Italy, Spain and France each banned the aircraft from entering their airspace, it was ultimately forced to land in Austria. Here, the plane was boarded as part of the search for U.S. fugitive Edward Snowden. Several Latin American heads of state promptly condemned the actions.

President Evo Morales is in his second presidential term after first being elected in 2005. He campaigned on the promise of alleviating Bolivia’s crippling poverty — Bolivia was Latin America’s poorest nation at the time he was elected — and is Bolivia’s first indigenous leader. He became internationally recognisable for the striped jumper he wore while meeting with high level dignitaries, including kings and presidents, around the world. His actions as President have included halving his own salary and those of his ministers, seizing Bolivia’s gas and oil reserves, and redistributing the nation’s unused countryside to the poor.

President Morales had been bound for bilateral talks in China. He maintains he will not be prevented from attending them.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 13, 2010

Copiapó, Chile mining accident: in depth

Copiapó, Chile mining accident: in depth

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Rescue efforts in the San José Mine, on August 10.
Image: desierto_atacama.

Laurence Golborne, Mining Minister of Chile.
Image: Ministerio Secretaría General de Gobierno de Chile.

The rescue of the Chilean miners trapped in the San José Mine in Copiapó, codenamed Operación San Lorenzo (San Lorenzo Operation), began on Tuesday night, at around 20:00 local time (23:00 UTC).

Florencio Ávalos was the first miner to be rescued, at 00:12 local time (03:12 UTC) on Wednesday. He was wearing a shirt signed by all his fellow miners. “The first miner is already with us. We saw it all, him hugging his wife Monica and his son Byron,” said President Piñera shortly after the first rescue. “We still have a long journey.”

“This will be recorded on every single Chilean heart forever,” Piñera added. “I hope the miners’ hope stay with us, just like the [February] earthquake victims’ [hope] and what the earthquake took off. We know that the disasters unite us all.”

All the 33 miners were rescued. The last miner, Luis Urzúa, was rescued at 21:55 Chile time (00:55 UTC). “It is a pleasure to be Chilean, [I’m] proud,” said Luis Urzúa to President Piñera. “In honour of the miners, their families, the rescuers […] let’s sing our national anthem. Viva Chile Mierda!,” said Piñera. Urzúa thanked Mining Minister Golborne and the First Lady Cecilia Morel for “fighting for their lives.” “I’m proud of my fellow miners,” Urzúa added.

Six rescuers, including a miner and a paramedic, descended to the miners’ shelter using the Fénix 3 capsule which was specially constructed for the rescue. They performed check-ups and talk with the miners before taking them back to the surface. The rescuers still don’t leave the mine.

The Fénix 3 capsules are 3.95 metres in height and weigh about 460 kilograms. They have an armour, an oxygen tube and a microphone. The occupants helmets contain an intercom to keep them in contact with the rescue team on the surface.

President of Chile Piñera assisted to the rescue. Bolivian President Evo Morales could not attend Carlos Mamani’s rescue. Mamani is the only Bolivian miner in the group.

A mass for the miners was conducted at 18:00 local time (21:00 UTC). The rescue takes between 15 and 20 minutes for each miner.

On Tuesday, Mayor of Copiapó Maglio Cicardini announced that the municipal schools in the city will have no classes this Wednesday “to transform the rescue of the Atacama’s 33 in a familiar meeting,” Radio Cooperativa reported.

“The miners will be taken to the Copiapó Regional Hospital for medical checkup, where they will have to stay for 48 hours,” Health Minister Mañalich said to Televisión Nacional de Chile.

Celebrations are taking place in several Chilean cities. In Santiago de Chile, people gathered in one of the most important points of the city, Plaza Italia. In Pichilemu, tens of cars are passing over its most important streets. In Copiapó, people gathered in its main square to assist a massive concert.

Background

Rescue worker Patricio Sepúlveda inside the Fénix capsule, before descending to the miners’ shelter.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

On August 5, 33 miners were trapped more than 700 meters (2,300 ft) underground, in the San José copper–gold mine, located about 40 kilometers north of Copiapó, Chile.

The youngest trapped miner is 19 years old, and the oldest is 63. There were several rescue attempts before reaching the miners’ shelter on August 22. The National Emergencies Office of Chile (ONEMI) released a list of the trapped miners on August 6, which included Franklin Lobos Ramírez, a retired footballer.

Chile is the worlds top producer of copper, according to The Economist. The San José Mine is owned by the San Esteban Mining Company (Empresa Minera San Esteban). The mine was closed down in 2007, after relatives of a miner who had died sued the company executives, but the mine was re–opened in 2008.

It was originally estimated that “it would take three to four months to complete the rescue of the trapped miners”. There were three plans to reach the miners: “Plan A” using a Strata 950 drill, “Plan B” using a Schramm T130XD drill, and “Plan C” using a RIG-422 drill. The first to reach the miners was “Plan B”, early on Saturday 9.

The last step of their rescue, announced by Health Minister Jaime Mañalich, was originally due to begin on Tuesday. Laurence Golborne, Minery Minister said “If it is possible, and the cement sets before and we don’t have any impediments to doing it, it would be wonderful,” in a press conference on Monday. The men will be extracted in a steel rescue capsule 54 cm (21 inches) in diameter.

On September 4, Chilean filmmaker Rodrigo Ortúzar announced plans to film a movie about the accident, called “Los 33” (“The 33”). The film will be released in 2011.

The miners

One miner is Bolivian, and the other 32 are Chilean.

Raúl Bustos

Raúl Bustos, 40 years old, is an hydraulics engineer. He left his job in Talcahuano after the February 27 earthquake to work in the mine.

Daniel Herrera

Daniel Herrera after his rescue.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Daniel Herrera, 27 years old, is a lorry driver. He has acted as paramedic assistant in the mine. He said to La Tercera “the miners were unhappy with the psychologist in the rescue team.”

Claudio Acuña

Claudio Acuña, miner, is fan of the Colo-Colo football club. The BBC reports he is aged 56, but El Comercio says he is 44.

Pedro Cortez

Pedro Cortez is aged 24. He joined the mine with his friend Carlos Bugueño. Cortez is an electrician, and lost a finger in the mine a year ago.

Juan Aguilar

File:Juan Aguilar with President Piñera.jpg

Juan Carlos Aguilar after he was rescued with President Sebastián Piñera. Aguilar’s shirt says “In his hand are the depths of the earth. And the heights of the hills are his;” “His is the Honor and the Glory.”
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

A native of Los Lagos, Juan Aguilar is 49 years old. Aguilar is married to Cristy Coronado, according to El Comercio. Aguilar works as a supervisor.

Mario Sepúlveda

Mario Sepúlveda is a 39 years old electrician native of Parral; he is married. He has been the spokesman of the most of the miners’ videos. Mario Sepúlveda was the second miner to be rescued, on Wednesday at 01:10 local time (04:10 UTC).

Víctor Zamora

Víctor Zamora is a 33 years old auto mechanic. Zamora is married to Jéssica Cortez, who confirmed she was pregnant while he was in the mine.

Osman Araya

Osman Araya is 30 years old, and married. He began working as miner four months before the accident.

Florencio Ávalos

Florencio Ávalos was the first miner to be rescued.
Image: Government of Chile TV.

Florencio Ávalos is 31 years old. He is the brother of Renán Ávalos, who is also trapped in the mine. He worked as driver in San José. Ávalos filmed videos, sent later to his relatives.

Ávalos was the first miner to be rescued, on Wednesday at 00:10 local time (03:10 UTC).

Jorge Galleguillos

Jorge Galleguillos, 56 years old, has worked all his life in the mine. He said in one video he was feeling unwell; he takes medication for hypertension.

Carlos Barrios

Carlos Barrios is a 27 years old miner. His father, Antenor Barrios, told Agence France-Presse: “I find he’s very strong and has enthusiasm. He spoke loud and clear. I was excited.”

Franklin Lobos

Franklin Lobos shortly after his rescue.
Image: Gabriel Ortega / Government of Chile.

Franklin Lobos Ramírez is a 53 years old retired footballer. He played for Cobresal, Deportes Antofagasta, Club de Deportes Santiago Wanderers and Unión La Calera, and briefly for the Chile national football team. Lobos had worked as a truck driver in the mine.

Yonni Barrios

Yonni Barrios, called “The Doctor”, is a 50 years old electrician. He has knowledge of first aid, and was given responsibility for monitoring the health of his colleagues. “I felt I was in hell,” Barrios said in a letter to his wife.

Carlos Bugueño

Carlos Bugueño, 27 years old, joined the mine with Pedro Cortez. Previously, he worked as a watchman.

Alex Vega

Miner Vega after being rescued at 08:53 local time (11:53 UTC).
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Alex Vega Salazar is a 31 years old heavy machinery mechanic. He is married to Jessica Salgado, and celebrated his birthday in the mine on September 22.

Ariel Ticona

Ariel Ticona is a 29 years old miner. His wife, Margarita gave birth to his daughter on September 14. She was named Esperanza (Hope), at Ticona’s request.

Richard Villarroel

Richard Villarroel is a 27 years old mechanic from Coyhaique.

Edison Peña

Edison Peña is a 34 years old miner. “I want to go out soon,” he said on his first contact with his relatives. “I want to be free, I want to see the sun,” he added. He is a fan of Elvis Presley.

Claudio Yáñez

Claudio Yáñez is 34 years old, and works as drill operator.

José Ojeda

José Ojeda leaving the Fénix capsule.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

José Ojeda, 46 years old, is the master driller. Ojeda is widowed and diabetic.

Luis Urzúa

Luis Urzúa is a 54 year old topographer. He is the shift-leader, and was the first miner to talk with authorities. He is known as Don Lucho among the miners. He draw plans of the area of the mine where they are trapped.

Urzúa will be the last miner to leave the mine.

José Henríquez

José Henríquez is a 54 years old drill master. He is also an evangelical preacher, and has worked in mines for 33 years.

Víctor Segovia

Víctor Segovia was the fifteenth miner to be rescued.
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Víctor Segovia is a 48 years old electrician. He is in charge of writing down everything that happens in the mine.

Pablo Rojas

Pablo Rojas is a 45 years old explosives loader. Married, he had been working less than six months in the mine.

Juan Illanes

Juan Illanes is a 51 year old miner. He was a sergeant in the Beagle border conflict between Chile and Argentina in 1978, the incident which almost provoked a war between the countries.

Illanes was rescued on Wednesday, at 02:07 local time (05:07 UTC).

Jimmy Sánchez

Jimmy Sánchez, 19, is the youngest miner. He had been working in the mine for five months before the accident. His role is to check the temperature and humidity in the mine.

Samuel Ávalos

Samuel Ávalos is a 43 years miner. His wife Ruth said “he was addicted to the cocaine.” His role in the rescue is to check air quality in the area the miners are living. According to the BBC, “Ávalos has worked in the mine for five months.”

Mario Gómez

Mario Gómez, the oldest miner was rescued at 08:00 local time (11:00 UTC).
Image: Hugo Infante / Government of Chile.

Mario Gómez, aged 63, is the oldest of the miners. He has worked 51 years as miner. His father was also a miner, and is nicknamed “El Navegao” (“The Sailed One”). He was thinking of retiring in November.

Gómez also wrote the message “Estamos bien en el refugio los 33” (“We are fine in the shelter the 33 [of us]”).

Darío Segovia

Segovia is 48 years old. He is married to Jessica Chille, who said “To hear his voice was a confort to my heart,” after talking with him for the first time in 24 days. His sister María, was nicknamed “La Alcaldesa” (“The Mayoress”) for her leading role at Campamento Esperanza. His father, Darío Senior, was trapped in a mine for a week, and suffered serious injuries after two other mining accidents, according to the BBC.

Carlos Mamani

Carlos Mamani is a 23 years old heavy equipment operator. He is also the only non-Chilean miner; Mamani is Bolivian. He began working in the mine just five days before the accident.

He was rescued at 03:11 local time (06:11 UTC) on Wednesday.

Renán Ávalos

Renán Ávalos after his rescue.
Image: Gabriel Ortega / Government of Chile.

Renán Ávalos is a 29 years old miner, single, who had been working for five months in the mine before the accident. Florencio Ávalos is his brother.

Omar Reygadas

Omar Reygadas is a 56 year old electrician. He began working in the mine shortly before the accident.

Esteban Rojas

Esteban Rojas is a 44 years old miner. Rojas is married to Jessica Yáñez.



Related news

  • Chilean miners rescue to begin on Tuesday, Minister Mañalich announces” — Wikinews, October 9, 2010
  • “Rodrigo Ortúzar announces plans to dramatize Chilean miners’ stories” — Wikinews, September 4, 2010
  • “Race to save Chilean miners trapped underground from spiralling into depression continues” — Wikinews, September 2, 2010
  • “Chilean miners trapped after mine collapse; miscalculated drilling delays rescue” — Wikinews, August 11, 2010

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 7, 2009

Reports say Bolivian president reelected

Reports say Bolivian president reelected

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, December 7, 2009

Bolivia
Other stories from Bolivia
…More articles here
Location of Bolivia

A map showing the location of Bolivia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Bolivia, see the Bolivia Portal
Flag of Bolivia.svg

File photograph of Evo Morales

Exit polls in Bolivia indicate that President Evo Morales has earned a second term after winning re-election on Sunday.

Bolivian media report that the president gained at least 61%, 35 points ahead of his closest challenger, former governor Manfred Reyes.

“This process of change has prevailed,” Morales said on the balcony of his presidential residence, addressing supporters.

Morales was first elected in 2005 and is the South American country’s first indigenous president. Analysts say the victory means he will likely continue reforms aimed at greater government control over the economy and social spending programs for the poor.

Bolivia’s voters also chose a new Congress, with polls showing the president’s Movement Toward Socialism party well ahead, securing about two-thirds of the seats.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 26, 2009

Bolivia\’s Evo Morales wins referendum on a new leftist constitution

Bolivia’s Evo Morales wins referendum on a new leftist constitution

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Bolivia
Other stories from Bolivia
  • 21 September 2013: Bolivian president announces legal action over Obama’s ‘crimes against humanity’
  • 10 May 2011: Four U.N. staff dead after plane crash in Bolivia
  • 7 April 2011: ACLU, EFF challenging US ‘secret’ court orders seeking Twitter data
  • 7 December 2009: Reports say Bolivian president reelected
  • 4 December 2009: American botanist Lou Jost discovers world’s smallest orchid
…More articles here
Location of Bolivia

A map showing the location of Bolivia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Bolivia, see the Bolivia Portal
Flag of Bolivia.svg

Monday, January 26, 2009 File:Schafik handal con fidel.jpg

Schafik Hándal, Hugo Chávez, Fidel Castro and Bolivia President Evo Morales in Havana, 2004.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

The Bolivian President, Evo Morales, 49, has claimed victory after voters ratified a new leftist constitution, granting more power to the country’s indigenous majority.

“The indigenous farmers, the most marginalized sector throughout the history of the republic, are now recognized as people with the same rights as any citizen. Here begins the new Bolivia. Here we begin to reach true equality,” Morales told a crowd in front of the flag-draped balcony of Palacio Quemado in La Paz, the administrative capital of Bolivia.

Ratified with about 60 percent support in a referendum on Sunday based on exit polls, the new constitution lets Morales run for re-election later this year and grants him tighter control over the economy. An official vote count of some 3.8 million registered voters who cast their ballots will be announced February 4.

With the new Magna Carta, South America’s second poorest country after Guyana becomes a leader in the regional “pink tide” of left-wing governments that have ousted traditional elites and challenged American influence. The new constitution’s elements include recognition of 36 distinct Indian “nations”, increasing the autonomy of Bolivia’s nine regions, establishing state control over key natural resources such as gas, and setting limits on land ownership.

Palacio Quemado, the Bolivian Palace of Government, located on Plaza Murillo in downtown La Paz.

Morales has also promised Bolivia’s native groups that the constitution will keep the white “oligarchs” who ruled the country for 183 years from returning to power. The leftist constitution empowers the government to distribute land to indigenous communities and apportion ethnic quotas for state jobs, including congress seats. “After 500 years, we have retaken the Plaza Murillo! Internal colonialism and external colonialism end here too. Sisters and brothers, neo-liberalism ends here too!” said Morales.

Vice-President Álvaro MarceloGarcía Linera, a principal author of the draft constitution, hailed Sunday’s referendum results, saying, “this will be an egalitarian Bolivia, a Bolivia that leaves behind a dark, colonial, racist past.” Linera, however, has acknowledged that the government has provoked deep divisions and faces vehement oppositions from many of the traditional elite, coming from many mixed-race people in the fertile eastern lowlands which rejected the draft charter.

“I am not saying there will be no more conflict, there will be tensions for a while, I say a decade … but we will have built a state on three principles: the economy under state control, equality, and the territorial decentralization of power,” he said. The new constitution was rejected in four opposition-controlled regions: the tropical lowlands of Pando, Santa Cruz, Tarija and Beni, which contain most of Bolivia’s natural gas production and are responsible for most of its agricultural output.

Cquote1.svg There will be tensions for a while, I say a decade… but we will have built a state on three principles: the economy under state control, equality, and the territorial decentralization of power. Cquote2.svg

—Bolivian Vice-President Álvaro MarceloGarcía Linera, on reactions to the new constitution.

With the split vote, Oscar Ortiz, the president of the opposition-controlled Senate, has voiced concerns that the charter has become a war of ideas. “The result [of the vote] … will show deep divisions between regions and between Bolivians in each region. A confrontation between ideas and visions about how this country will build its common future will continue,” he said ahead of the referendum.

Álvaro Marcelo García Linera vice-president of Bolivia, with Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, president of Brazil

Former president Carlos Mesa has predicted that the constitution is unlikely to pave the way for real social change amid continuing political struggles. “We will have so many legal battles to go through that I fear that last year’s belligerent climate will continue this year. President Morales is not coming at this with open hands, he has built trenches and dug in,” Mr. Mesa said.

Morales has dismissed the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the U.S. Ambassador to Bolivia, accusing both of conspiracy with the opposition to overthrow his government. The U.S. Embassy in La Paz has called the accusations “false and absurd.” Morales has been very popular among the poor and among Aymara, Quechua and Guarani.

The new constitution’s 411 articles address underrepresentation of indigenous peoples. “It may be the equivalent of Spain’s Reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula from the Moors in 1492. But instead of the blood spilled in that process, Bolivia is advancing in a democratic process that does not exclude or subjugate anyone,” said Xavier Albó, a Jesuit scholar and linguist.

“Finally we have a constitution that leaves racism and hatred aside, because indigenous people are included,” said Adolfo Chavez, president of the Confederation of Indigenous people of Bolivia (CIDOB).

Morales’ ascent to presidency

In March 2005, then-President Mesa resigned. The President of Senate Hormando Vaca Díez assumed office as the country’s temporary President. Mesa resigned because of the announcement of highway blockages by Evo Morales and leaders of both the coca growers and the Movement Toward Socialism (MAS). The blockages were meant to pressure the Legislative so that the Hydrocarbons Law, which would raise taxes levied on hydrocarbon extraction from 18% to 50%, could be approved.

Former Bolivia President Carlos Mesa

The MAS is a political party formed basically by coca-growing campesinos (farmers or farmworkers), communists, admirers of Fidel Castro and indigenous people. The party is against the U.S. government and the alleged American influence in the region, neoliberalism and globalization.

In December 2005, Morales won the presidential election in Bolivia to serve a five-year term. In the 2005 election, his victory marked the country’s first election of an indigenous head of state, but this claim gendered controversy due to the number of mestizo presidents who were elected or appointed before him. He was openly criticized by such figures as Mario Vargas Llosa, who accuses the President of fomenting racial divisions in an increasingly mestizo Latin America.

Morales ran on a campaign of restoring coca farming in Bolivia, in spite of the U.S. program aimed at reducing the ability to grow coca to curb the cocaine industry. Morales is an Aymara Indian and former coca farmer himself, and has described his victory as a signal that “a new history of Bolivia begins, a history where we search for equality, justice and peace with social justice.”

Morales is an admirer of Fidel Castro and he says he is also inspired by the President Hugo Chavez of Venezuela and Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Morales supports the creation of an anti-imperialist block formed by Latin-American and Arabian countries against the U.S., which is being organized by the Brazilian President.

2008 unrest in Bolivia

In August 2008, Bolivian unrest began against Morales and calls for greater autonomy for the country’s eastern departments grew. Santa Cruz, Beni, Pando, Tarija and Chuquisaca called strikes and protests to oppose the central government’s plan to divert part of the national direct tax on hydrocarbons in favor of its Renta Dignidad pension plan. Brief clashes occurred in the Santa Cruz de la Sierra between police and armed youths enforcing the strike. Violence between Morales’ supporters and opponents resulted in at least 30 deaths.

In September 2008, Bolivian authorities declared a state of emergency in Pando, where Bolivian troops took control of the airport in the region’s capital, Cobija. Amid preparations to retake the city, 20 people were killed. In October 2008, the government and the opposition held talks following which resulted in the signing of a compromise agreement which set the referendum on 25 January 2009 and early elections on December 6, 2009.

Morales in turn promised that he would not run again in 2014 after his likely reelection in 2009, despite the fact that he would be allowed to do so under the new constitution. The new constitution was drafted by the Constituent Assembly in 2007. The referendum set forth two questions: whether to approve the new constitution and whether to limit private estates to 1,000 or 5,000 hectares.



Related news

Sources

Wikipedia Learn more about Evo Morales and the 2009 constitutional referendum on Wikipedia.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 2, 2007

Hugo Chavez meets Iran\’s Imam Khamenei

Hugo Chavez meets Iran’s Imam Khamenei – Wikinews, the free news source

Hugo Chavez meets Iran’s Imam Khamenei

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, July 2, 2007

Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez met Grand Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. They pledged further cooperation of “independent nations.”

The visit of Chavez to Tehran, Iran, followed earlier ones to Russia and Belarus. Iran’s state-run television reported that Hugo Chavez stated to Khamenei that Iran was an apt model for other nations to emulate.

Chavez said that the two nations’ ties in the petroleum, gasoline, and petrochemical sectors will be expanded.

In a reference to the recent political development in various parts of Latin America where anti-American leaders have attained political control, Chavez said, “U.S. imperialism is declining, and independent countries are viewing the future with hope and optimism.”

Both Venezuela and Iran are members of OPEC.

Last month, Daniel Ortega, the president of Nicaragua, came to Iran. In the following months, Evo Morales, the president of Bolivia, is expected in Tehran.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 16, 2007

Clashes in central Bolivian city kills two

Clashes in central Bolivian city kills two

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, January 16, 2007

Location of Bolivia.

President of Bolivia Evo Morales.

Fighting broke out between rioters and civil defense groups in the central Bolivian city of Cochabamba on Thursday, January 11 leaving 2 dead and 240 injured.

Coca farmers backing the government of president Evo Morales attacked government buildings and set fire to part of the local government offices in Cochabamba.

The rioters were demanding the resignation of the state governor – a critic of president Morales who supported a move to give Bolivia’s states greater autonomy.

Opposition political parties have demanded an investigation into allegations that president Morales’ ally, senator Leonilda Zurita, delivered supplies to the demonstrators who have laid siege to the local government building.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 21, 2006

Venezuelan President Chavez criticises U.S. President Bush in U.N. address

Venezuelan President Chavez criticises U.S. President Bush in U.N. address

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, September 21, 2006

In an address to the UN General Assembly in New York on September 20, 2006 Hugo Chávez, President of Venezuela, sharply criticized the US government and its policies.

At the same time he announced his country’s bid for a non-permanent seat on the Security Council, saying that it will speak for all countries which “have no power, no power to make any impact on the terrible situation in the world” for which, he indicated, the US is responsible.

President Hugo Chávez said that the greatest terrorist threat for the world is the US government and its imperialistic policies. When speaking to the assembly, Chávez displayed the book “Hegemony or Survival”, written by Noam Chomsky, and recommended “this excellent book” to the audience. He described this book as being written “clearly and in depth” an that “the American empire is doing all it can to consolidate its system of domination.”

He said that “the hegemonic intentions of the imperialistic power are threatening the world”, and called on all the peoples of the world, including Americans, to respond to that threat.

He warned Americans that “The devil is right at home. The devil — the devil, himself, is right in the house. And the devil came here yesterday.”, apparently referring to the United States President w:George W. Bush.

Hugo Chavez criticized Bush, saying the he was “talking as if he owned the world”, and called him “the spokesman of imperialism”.

Talking about the US efforts at nation-building, he said that it is “a very original democracy that’s imposed by weapons and bombs and firing weapons.”, adding “What a strange democracy. Aristotle might not recognize it or others who are at the root of democracy.”

When pushing his agenda of democracy and free trade in Latin America, Chávez accused President Bush of being a racist, saying that President Bush would look “at your color” and he say “oh, there’s an extremist. Evo Morales, the worthy president of Bolivia, looks like an extremist to him.”

Chavez indicated Bush discriminates against Morales because Morales was the country’s first Indian president. The newly elected president of Bolivia, announced plans of socializing part of the energy resources, particularly gas in Bolivia in 2005 in a move to try to be more independent from multinational coorporations.

As the president of the Bolivian Senate, Santos Ramirez, put it: “Bolivia and Latin America are no longer the servile democracies that tolerate…poverty and the surrendering of sovereignty.”

Chavez is pushing his own socio-economic agenda. For example the People’s Trade Treaty consisting of Bolivia, Venezuela and Cuba and Mercosur, an economic union designed after the European Union for which in turn Bush sharply criticized him.

Chavez defended Morales in his speech by saying “The imperialists see extremists everywhere. It’s not that we are extremists. It’s that the world is waking up.”

Chavez referred to Bush’s speech the day before, when Bush directly addressed the peoples of Afghanistan, Lebanon and Iran, telling the assembly “what would those peoples of the world tell him if they were given the floor? What would they have to say? – They would say, “Yankee imperialist, go home.””.

To address the current political issues he mentioned, Chavez complained that “But we, the assembly, have been turned into a merely deliberative organ. We have no power, no power to make any impact on the terrible situation in the world. And that is why Venezuela once again proposes, here, today, 20 September, that we re-establish the United Nations.”

In particular. he criticized the “the anti-democratic” veto held by the Permanent Five members of the Security Council, Citing the “immoral” veto of the United States which he said, “allowed the Israelis, with impunity, to destroy Lebanon.”, referring to the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict

Chavez said that he wants to provide an “alternative way of thinking” and canvassed for the support of the international community for Venezuela to attain a seat on the United Nations Security Council to “to save our planet, to save the planet from the imperialist threat.” and “for our children and our grandchildren a world of peace based on the fundamental principles of a renewed United Nations.”

U.S. Response

U.N. Ambassador John Bolton said the remarks don’t warrant a response. The US is currently lobbying for Venezuela not to attain a seat on the U.N. Security Council.

Rep. Charles Rangel (Democrats) who represents a New York City neighborhood which Chavez recently visited said “I just want to make it abundantly clear to Hugo Chavez or any other president – don’t come to the United States and think because we have problems with our president that any foreigner can come to our country and not think that Americans do not feel offended when you offend our Chief of State. Any demeaning public attack against him is viewed by Republicans and Democrats, and all Americans, as an attack on all of us.”

Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 1, 2006

Bolivian troops told to seize natural gas fields

Bolivian troops told to seize natural gas fields

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, May 1, 2006

President Evo Morales

Bolivian President Evo Morales has ordered that all foreign-owned natural gas fields be turned over to the national government of Bolivia.

President Morales signed a decree that orders troops to seize the fields “immediately” to ensure gas production. The decree also says that companies have 180 days to sign over their fields or leave the country.

The fields are owned by such companies as the United States’ Exxon-Mobil Corporation, Brazil’s Petroleo Brasileiro SA, Spanish-Argentine Repsol YPF SA, and Great Britain’s BG Group PLC and BP PLC.

“The looting by the foreign companies has ended. We are not a government of mere promises, we follow through on what we propose and what the people demand. We want to ask (the Armed Forces) that starting now, they occupy all the energy fields in Bolivia along with battalions of engineers,” said Mr Morales after signing the decree.

“The time has come, the awaited day, a historic day in which Bolivia retakes absolute control of our natural resources,” added President Morales.

One of Morales’ vows in his presidential campaign was to “recover” the country’s natural resources by renationalizing them. President Morales explained, on a visit to Brazil in January, that renationalising the industry would not mean expelling foreign companies or expropriating foreign property. “Foreign companies have every right to recover investments and make profits, but profits should be balanced”.

Bolivia has the second largest supply of natural gas in South America after Venezuela.

Icon of loudspeaker
This audio file was created from the text revision dated 2006-05-03 and may not reflect subsequent text edits to this report. (audio help)
Audio Wikinews

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 22, 2006

Two explosions in La Paz kill 2, injure 6

Two explosions in La Paz kill 2, injure 6

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, March 22, 2006

Destruction left by one of the explosions.

Two explosions were heard in the city of La Paz, Bolivia on Tuesday night, March 22 and in the early morning Wednesday, March 23. The first occurred at the Linares Motel, at 21:50 (01:50 UTC), and left two people dead and four injured. The second explosion occurred at 01:45 (05:45 UTC) at the Hotel Riosinhio II, less than a block from the La Paz bus terminal, injuring two people.

Hours later, two suspects in the crime were arrested by the police in the city of El Alto. They were American Claudio Lestat, approximately 30 years old (25 according to some sources) and his partner, Uruguayan Alda Ribeiros, of 35 years (40 according to other sources). Dynamite was used in both explosions, according to government attorney Jorge Gutiérrez.

President Evo Morales indicated that the promoters of the incidents were “industrialists” and “oligarchists” who, “using external agents”, claimed to halt the reforms that have been happening in Bolivia. He also suggested that the United States could be behind the incidents: “Is there an effort against terrorism from the government of the United States, or did they send North Americans to commit terrorism in Bolivia?” Despite the accusations, the United States embassy in La Paz announced its cooperation.

However, authorities have not ruled out religious motives, because Lestat is a self-proclaimed “minister of pagan rites”. Police also announced that the Chilean consulate in the Bolivian capital was also a target, to be attacked on Saturday the 25th.

Names and ages of the victims of the explosions are: Marlene Patzi Tapia (26), Cristian López (26), Alva Natividad Heredia (44), and Jessica Wilson (24), the last from the United States. Also affected were Marco Antonio Romero Galindo (20), Iván Quiroga (27), Elizabeth de Quiroga (44) and Ximena Vargas (18).

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This article was translated from the Spanish Wikinoticias Dos explosiones en La Paz dejan dos muertos y seis heridos

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 4, 2006

Coca growth up in Bolivia, Peru, claims U.S. State Department

Coca growth up in Bolivia, Peru, claims U.S. State Department

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, March 4, 2006

File:Coca.jpg

Erythroxylum coca
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

According to a U.S. State Department report, coca growth is on the rise in Bolivia and Peru, and is a cause for concern. In a statement, the Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs said, “We are concerned about the inability thus far of Bolivia’s new president to articulate whether or not he will allow coca eradication and U.S. counter-narcotics assistance to continue.”

Evo Morales was elected President in December, 2005. At the time of his electoral victory, Morales claimed that he would support coca growth, but not for use in producing cocaine.

This puts Bolivia and Peru at risk of losing financial aid if they fail to meet international narcotics agreements, according to the U.S. State Department report. The report is part of the framework on which the U.S. establishes its list of major drug-trafficking and drug-producing countries.

Related news

  • “Karzai blames U.S. and Britain for increased opium production” — Wikinews, May 23, 2005

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress