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October 30, 2009

Chris Hughton appointed permanent manager of Newcastle United

Filed under: Archived,England,Newcastle United F.C.,Sports — admin @ 5:00 am

Chris Hughton appointed permanent manager of Newcastle United

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Friday, October 30, 2009

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Chris Hughton has been appointed permanent manager of English football club Newcastle United, having previously served as its temporary caretaker manager since the start of the season. His permanent contract was to run until the end of the 2010–11 season.

The 50 year old former Tottenham Hotspur and Republic of Ireland defender joined the club in 2008 when he was appointed Newcastle United assistant manager by Kevin Keegan, with the club at the time in the top flight of English football, the Premier League. Hughton then became temporary Newcastle United caretaker manager twice last season, as managers came and went, and at the end of the season, the club were ultimately relegated to the second tier, the Football League Championship. In his third spell as caretaker, he had been in charge of the club since the start of the season, and had guided the team to the top of the table, and for his efforts was awarded the Football League Championship Manager of the Month twice, for August and September.

Hughton stated of his appointment:

“It’s a very proud day for me to be named as the manager of this magnificent football club. I will be doing everything in my power to get the club back into the Premier League at the first time of asking. Having the unequivocal backing of the players has helped me enormously and I would also like to thank Colin Calderwood, Paul Barron and the rest of the backroom staff who have been tremendously supportive to me this season.”

According to Sky Sports, many Newcastle fans had ‘made no secret of their desire’ to see a return to the club as manager of Alan Shearer after relegation and over the summer break. Shearer, the former club captain, was hired on a short term 8 game contract at the end of last season, but could not steer the club away from relegation. As the new season progressed, Hughton remained caretaker, and ten days prior to Hughton’s appointment, Shearer had said:

“I can’t revolve my life around that any more because I have other things going on. If it happens, it happens, and if it doesn’t, it doesn’t…And at the moment Chris Hughton is doing a great job.”

The announcement came on the same day as it announced that the club would be putting the naming rights of the club stadium St James’ Park up for offers next season, and that owner Mike Ashley was taking the club off the market for a second time.



Related news

  • “Newcaslte United’s St. James’ Park naming rights go up for sale” — Wikinews, 2009-10-28
  • “Mike Ashley takes Newcastle United off the market for a second time” — Wikinews, 2009-10-28

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Mike Ashley takes Newcastle United off the market for a second time

Filed under: Archived,England,Newcastle United F.C.,Sports — admin @ 5:00 am

Mike Ashley takes Newcastle United off the market for a second time

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Friday, October 30, 2009

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Mike Ashley, the owner of English football club Newcastle United F.C., has taken the club off the market for a second time, after failing to concluded several negotiations, including a cash offer of £80 million, according to the club.

A club statement said of the move:

“Mike Ashley is totally committed to the future success of Newcastle United and will be focused on gaining promotion back to the Premier League. Mike will put a further £20m into the club this week.”

This is the second time Ashley has taken the club off the market after putting it up for sale. This season, Newcastle are competing in the Football League Championship, the second tier of English football, after relegation from the top flight Premier League at the end of last season. Ashley had bought the Premier League club in May 2007 for £134.4m, but after a difficult period of ownership, which saw the return and departure of manager Kevin Keegan after a few months, and after fan protests, Ashley eventually put the club up for sale for the first time in September 2008. In a statement at the time he said:

I am not stupid and have listened to the fans. I have really loved taking my kids to the games, being next to them and all the fans. But I am now a dad who can’t take his kids to a football game on a Saturday because I am advised that we would be assaulted. Therefore, I am no longer prepared to subsidise Newcastle United. I am putting the club up for sale. I hope that the fans get what they want and that the next owner is someone who can lavish the amount of money on the club that the fans want.

After failing to find a suitable buyer, Ashley took the club off the market in December 2008, stating he is “committing to the club as its owner”. After a poor season, culminating in relegation from the Premier League to the Football Championship for the first time in 16 years, Ashley put the club up for sale a second time after relegation in May 2009. Ashley stated of the situation “It’s been catastrophic for everybody. I’ve lost my money and made terrible decisions”.

The announcement came on the same day as it announced Chris Hughton as the club’s permanent manager, and that the club would be putting the naming rights of the club stadium St James’ Park up for offers next season.



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October 29, 2009

Newcastle United\’s St. James\’ Park naming rights go up for sale

Filed under: Archived,England,Newcastle United F.C.,Sports,The Times (UK) — admin @ 5:00 am

Newcastle United’s St. James’ Park naming rights go up for sale

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Thursday, October 29, 2009

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Present St James’ Park stadium sign outside the club’s main entrance

The naming rights for St James’ Park, the home ground of English football club Newcastle United F.C., are to be put up for sale. The club stated that the club would be “welcoming offers for the stadium naming rights next season”. The move was part of a new drive to “maximise its commercial revenues”, after the announcement that owner Mike Ashley was not selling the club, which had been up for sale since May 2009.

St James’ Park is the largest and oldest football stadium in North East England. Football had been played at St James’ Park since 1880, with Newcastle United using it as their home ground since their inception, in 1892. Despite Newcastle being in the second tier of football, St James Park is the third largest club football stadium in England, behind Old Trafford and the Emirates Stadium.

Naming rights is not unprecedented in English football, including the Premier League grounds the Britannia Stadium, DW Stadium, Emirates Stadium, KC Stadium and Reebok Stadium. Bookmakers Ladbrokes named sportswear company and current club sponsor Addidas favourites to secure the rights. In order to stop the move, BBC Radio Newcastle football commentator Mick Lowes suggested that the Newcastle United Supporters Trust’s used part of its reported £25m funds to pay Ashley not to sell the rights.

Ex-Newcastle striker and local sports pundit Malcolm Macdonald said of the decision:

they thought they had got on the wrong side of the people of Tyneside then just wait and see what happens if they go through with their plans to re-name St James’ Park because there will be an almighty uproar and outcry. It would upset people so much because it everyone’s second home. That is how people feel about it. It has been St James’ Park forever and a day and it should remain that way.

Lee Ryder, the Evening Chronicle’s chief sportswrite blogged:

We need to make Coors Light Park a fortress” – to even imagine a future Toon player uttering such words will make many physically sick…Renaming St James’s Park is simply bad taste in the eyes of most Geordie fans – and many will feel that even the injection of silly money to do it will do nothing to make up for another piece of heritage being ripped away from the Tyneside streets….Renaming St James’s Park to Coors Light Park, Bwin Park or even the McDonalds Arena shows that Newcastle’s top brass have again got it so seriously wrong

George Caulkin of The Times wrote of the decision:

Renaming St James’ Park is a muddle-headed, flawed and divisive notion which must not and cannot stand. In an era of recession, there may be a need for Newcastle, in their own words, to “maximise their commercial revenues,” but if it comes at the expense of goodwill (what little there is left of it), hope and a sense of community, it would also come at a bitter, prohibitive, self-defeating cost.

There has been debate over the correct spelling and pronunciation of the stadium name, with differing accounts based on its meaning and origin. In 2008, the club insisted to the BBC programme Look North that the the correct spelling of the Stadium is St James’ Park, with no following ‘s’ after James’, because the stadium is not named as “the park of St James”, rather, it is named after the nearby St James Street, which predates the ground.

The announcement came on the same day as it announced Chris Hughton as the club’s permanent manager, and that owner Mike Ashley was taking the club off the market for a second time.



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May 23, 2007

Ashley gives Newcastle £133m buyout offer

Ashley gives Newcastle £133m buyout offer

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Wednesday, May 23, 2007

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Newcastle United received a £133.1m ($263m) offer from English billionaire businessman Mike Ashley on May 23, 2007 to buy the club.

Ashley said in a statement “Newcastle United has a wonderful heritage and the passion of its fans is legendary. I am sure that, like me, they are already excited about the prospects for next season under the new manager’s stewardship.”

Ashley is already the largest shareholder in Newcastle United and currently runs Sports World International, the largest sporting goods retail in the United Kingdom.



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May 15, 2007

Newcastle United appoint Sam Allardyce

Newcastle United appoint Sam Allardyce – Wikinews, the free news source

Newcastle United appoint Sam Allardyce

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Tuesday, May 15, 2007

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Newcastle United appointed Sam Allardyce as manager on May 15, following the resignation of Glenn Roeder on May 6.

Allardyce had turned the opportunity to manage Newcastle down when offered it in the past as he chose to stay on as manager of Bolton Wanderers. However, Allardyce’s eight year stint as Bolton manager came to an end following his resignation on April 29, 2007. Allardyce cited that his need for a rest as well as his desire to win silverware was behind his decision.

When asked what made Newcastle a more likely destination for trophies than Bolton, he replied: “Everything about it. The resources, the facilities, the fans, the amount of revenue that can be generated by a club of this size. No disrespect to Bolton, it is a club I love, but this club is massive in terms of what it can achieve.”



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