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June 29, 2014

Canada wins 2014 Women\’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship

Canada wins 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship

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Sunday, June 29, 2014

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Team Canada realizes it has won
Image: Hawkeye7.

Team Canada realizes it has won
Image: Hawkeye7.

Maureen Orchard presents the winner’s trophy to Canada’s Janet McLachlan and Katie Harnock
Image: Hawkeye7.

Gold medal match. Germany’s Annika Zeyen and Canada’s Cindy Ouellet
Image: Hawkeye7.

Gold medal match. Canada’s Janet McLachlan
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mattamy Athletic Centre, Toronto, Canada — Canada has won the 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship at the Mattamy Athletic Centre in Toronto, defeating Germany 54–50 in the gold medal match yesterday afternoon. The game was a close one, which was decided in an exciting finish involving a series of missed shots and turnovers by both sides.

The Netherlands won the bronze medal game, defeating the United States 74–58. The score belied the closeness of the game. The Netherlands only pulled ahead in the third quarter. Attempts to gain extra time by sending the Netherlands to the free throw line in the closing minutes increased the margin to twenty points at one stage.

In her closing remarks, Maureen Orchard, the President of the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation, said the completion webcast had been watched by 68,000 people in 68 countries.



Sources[]

  • Courtney Pollock. “Schedule & Results” — Wheelchair Basketball Canada, June 28, 2014 (access date)
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June 28, 2014

Germany and Canada into 2014 Women\’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championships final

Germany and Canada into 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championships final

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Saturday, June 28, 2014

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Team USA braces for action in the semifinal against Germany
Image: Hawkeye7.

Canada’s Katie Harnock
Image: Hawkeye7.

Germany’s Simone Kues
Image: Hawkeye7.

Australian Glider Amber Merritt
Image: Hawkeye7.

Team Germany in the match against the USA
Image: Hawkeye7.

Team Netherlands in the semifinal against Canada
Image: Hawkeye7.

Canada’s Tim Frick is commentator on the webcast
Image: Hawkeye7.

The Mattamy Athletic Centre venue
Image: Neal Jennings.

Opening Ceremony
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mattamy Athletic Centre, Toronto, CanadaGermany defeated the United States and Canada defeated the Netherlands yesterday in the semifinals of the 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship at the Mattamy Athletic Centre in Toronto, Canada. Canada is now to meet Germany in the final this afternoon, immediately after the match between the United States and the Netherlands for the bronze medal.

Up until this point, the Netherlands has been undefeated. It led at every change, but the Canadian team persevered, represented on the court for most of the match by Tracey Furguson, Janet McLachlan, Cindy Ouellet, Katie Harnock and Jamey Jewells. In the final quarter, Canada pulled away. Two three-point field goals from the Netherlands’ Inge Huitzing nearly leveled the score. The Netherlands was able to pull ahead, but Team Canada managed to get a point in front when the siren sounded, for a final score of 74–75.

The second semifinal between Germany and the United States was an equally close affair, with the two sides neck and neck for most of the match, with the lead changing several times. The crowd was small, but vocal, and Wikinews was told by the German media that some 2,000 viewers in Germany had stayed up late to watch the match live via the webcast. Scores were tied at 46-all at three quarter time, but Germany’s Marina Mohnen, Gesche Schünemann and Mareike Adermann managed to build a six-point lead with less than four minutes to go, despite having no answer to the United States’ Rose Hollermann. The United States tried repeatedly sending Schünemann, Annika Zeyen and Simone Kues to the free throw line, only to find their shooting to be very accurate. When the siren sounded, Germany had won, 68–58.

In the consolation match preceding the Netherlands-Canada game, Australia defeated China. The Australian Gliders will play Great Britain tomorrow for fifth place.



Related news

  • “Germany, Netherlands, Canada and USA into Women’s Wheelchair Basketball Championships semi-finals” — Wikinews, June 27, 2014

Sources

  • Courtney Pollock. “Schedule & Results” — Wheelchair Basketball Canada, June 27, 2014 (access date)
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June 27, 2014

Germany, Netherlands, Canada and USA into Women\’s Wheelchair Basketball Championships semi-finals

Germany, Netherlands, Canada and USA into Women’s Wheelchair Basketball Championships semi-finals

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Friday, June 27, 2014

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Team USA huddled before a game at the 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship
Image: Hawkeye7.

Yesterday in Toronto, Canada at the 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship, four teams qualified for the semi-final rounds. The teams still in the running to win the competition are Germany, the Netherlands, Canada and the United States.

Germany qualified after defeating France 70–25. Mareike Adermann from Germany was named the player of the match. The Netherlands earned their spot after beating China 62–52. Dutch player Inge Huitzing was named the player of the match.

Janet McLachlan at the 2014 World Championships
Image: Hawkeye7.

Canada was the third team to reserve their spot in the semi-finals after beating Australia women’s national wheelchair basketball team 63–47. Cindy Ouellet of Canada was named the player of the match. Only four players scored for Canada: Ouellet led with 20 points, Janet McLachlan and Katie Harnock both scored 17, and Tracey Ferguson scored 9 points. Sarah Strewart led the Australian team in scoring with 12 points. Neither team made a three-point shot. Australia gave Canada ten attempts to make free throws, with Canada capitalizing on this to score 7 points. In contrast, Canada only gave the Australians one trip to the free throw line, with Amber Merritt scoring on the team’s only attempt.

The United States booked the last spot in the semi-finals after defeating Great Britain 53–41. The United States’ Gail Gaeng was named the player of the match. The team took an early 6–0 lead. While Helen Freeman and Louise Sugden were able to score for Great Britain, the first quarter ended 13–8 in favor of the US. Great Britain was able to get within three points early in the second quarter, but were never able to get closer to Team USA, despite managing again to pull within three points during the third period. The United States pulled ahead early in the fourth period by 12 points. Rebecca Murray and Gail Gaeng led the USA team in scoring with 15 points each.

In other matches played yesterday, Brazil won the eleventh place match after defeating Peru 88–8. Japan finished in ninth place after beating Mexico 68–40.

In semifinal play, Canada is scheduled to play the Netherlands today, and the United States is to take on Germany. France plays Great Britain, and China is to compete against Australia in consolidation match play.



Related news

  • “Japanese wheelchair basketball player Mari Amimoto leads in scoring at world championships” — Wikinews, June 25, 2014

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June 25, 2014

Japanese wheelchair basketball player Mari Amimoto leads in scoring at world championships

Japanese wheelchair basketball player Mari Amimoto leads in scoring at world championships

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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

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Animoto at last year’s Asia-Oceania championship
Image: Matthew Wells.

With five days of competition complete as of last night, Japanese wheelchair basketball player Mari Amimoto leads in scoring at the Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship taking place in Toronto, Canada. She scored 122 total points, 7 more than the second highest leading scorer, Canadian Janet McLachlan.

The 4.5 point player Amimoto, who plays club basketball in Australia, led her team in scoring with 18 in their opener against Canada, which they lost 83–53. In her team’s 61–55 loss to China, she again led her team in scoring with 22 points. In her third game in pool play, a 48–62 loss to Great Britain, she again led her team in scoring with 25 points. In her team’s only win in pool play, she scored 37 points against Brazil in a game they won 63–52. In the final game of pool play, she scored 20 points, leading her team in scoring in their 82–49 loss to Germany.

Amimoto matched up against British player Helen Freeman, another leading scorer in the tournament, in her game against Great Britain. Freeman held back Amimoto’s game after Japan took a very an early lead 4–2.

On her personal blog, Amimoto thanked people for their continued support((jp)) and said she was excited to be playing in the ninth place match against Mexico, and it is a game she really wants to win.((jp))

Overall in the competition, 126 players have scored at least two total points. Canada is the only nation with more than one player amongst the top ten scorers. Their second leading scorer is Katie Harnock, with 75 points so far. Other players in the top ten include USA player Rebecca Murray with 105 points, Dutch Mariska Beijer with 101 points, Chinese player Yong Qing Fu with 99 points, Mexican player Floralia Estrada with 96 points, British player Helen Freeman with 89 points, German player Marina Mohnen with 88 points, and French player Angelique Pichon with 76 points.

Round robin play concluded yesterday, with France, Germany, China, the Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Great Britain and the United States all having qualified to play in quarter-final matches scheduled for tomorrow. Japan was scheduled to play Mexico for ninth place, and Brazil was scheduled to play Peru for eleventh place.



Sources

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December 1, 2013

Australian men, women win 2013 Asia-Oceania Wheelchair Basketball Championships

Australian men, women win 2013 Asia-Oceania Wheelchair Basketball Championships

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Sunday, December 1, 2013

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Thai-Japanese Bangkok Youth Center, Bangkok — The Australia men’s national wheelchair basketball team, known as the Rollers, and the Australia women’s national wheelchair basketball team, known as the Gliders, won gold medals on Friday, the final day of the Asia–Oceania Zone Wheelchair Basketball Championships in Bangkok, Thailand. The eight day championship was opened on November 22.

Asia–Oceania Zone Wheelchair Basketball Championships, Bangkok, 2013. IWBF President Maureen Orchard presents silver medals to the Chinese women’s team
Image: Hawkeye7.

Australian Gliders are addressed by their head coach, Tom Kyle
Image: Hawkeye7.

Maureen Orchard. President and Secretary General of the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation
Image: Hawkeye7.

Asia–Oceania Zone Wheelchair Basketball Championships — Australia’s Amber Merritt
Image: Matthew Wells.

Asia–Oceania Zone Wheelchair Basketball Championships — Japan’s Mari Animoto
Image: Matthew Wells.

Asia–Oceania Zone Wheelchair Basketball Championships — Australia’s Tristan Knowles
Image: Matthew Wells.

Ten countries competed for places at the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF) World Championships next year — ten in the men’s: Japan, Iran, China, Malaysia, Taipei, Australia, Korea, Kuwait, New Zealand and Thailand; and four in the women’s: Australia, Japan, China and Thailand. For the Australians, it was a rare opportunity to play teams from neighboring countries. Their efforts to help other teams were appreciated; after one game the Kuwait men led a cheer of “Aussie! Aussie! Aussie!” To which the Thai women replied: “Oi! Oi! Oi!”

Both the Australian teams went through the tournament undefeated. The Gliders defeated China in the gold medal game 57–35. The Rollers then took to the court and defeated Korea 63–46. Iran and Japan won the men’s and women’s bronze medal matches.

This was one of four zone championships. The zones correspond to those of the IPC and FIBA: Americas, Europe, Asia–Oceania and Africa. Each zone is guaranteed one place at the World Championships. Under recently-introduced rules, performance at the Paralympic games gains additional spots for the zone, not for the country. Only the home team is guaranteed a place.

The new zone system has already proved controversial, with Algeria defeating South Africa in the recent Africa Zone Championships in Angola to grab the sole spot allocated to Africa, and Canada missing out on one of the four men’s spots for the Americas zone. In a shock result, these places went to the United States, Argentina, Mexico and Colombia. Great Britain, Turkey, Spain, Sweden, Italy, Germany and the Netherlands are to round out the championships as the men’s teams from the European Zone.

The men’s World Championship are to be held in July next year in Incheon, South Korea, while the women’s are to be in Toronto, Canada. Maureen Orchard. President and Secretary General of the IWBF told Wikinews the women’s competition will in no way be inferior to the men’s. The women are to be put up in a five-star hotel, and play at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens. Without their men’s team competing, the women’s competition is expected to generate considerable interest in Canada. The home team is to be joined by teams from the Netherlands, Germany, Great Britain, France, the United States, Brazil, Mexico, and Peru to compete against the winners from the Asia–Oceania Zone.

The sport of wheelchair basketball has great popularity. In London, additional seats at the North Greenwich Arena sold out online within minutes.



Sources

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January 4, 2013

Wikinews interviews Australian Paralympic wheelchair basketballer Shelley Chaplin

Wikinews interviews Australian Paralympic wheelchair basketballer Shelley Chaplin

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Friday, January 4, 2013

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Portrait of Australian wheelchair basketballer Shelley Chaplin, 2012.
Image: Australian Paralympic Committee/Australian Sports Commission.

Recently, Wikinews spent time with with Australian Paralympic wheelchair basketballer Shelley Chaplin.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Interview with Shelley Chaplin. First of all, what position do you play?

Shelley Chaplin: Usually a point guard.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Right. And whenever I go to see the basketball in Canberra, we pass by a glass case. In the case is a guernsey with number twelve on it, and a big sign that says that this was the guernsey worn by Shelley Chaplin…

Shelley Chaplin: That’s me! That’s my…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It’s signed by the rest of the team, if you look — press your nose to the glass and look really close. How did that come to be there?

Shelley Chaplin: It’s actually the singlet that I wore in Beijing. Usually you get people to sign stuff. Anyway, the AIS just asked everybody if we would donate something […]. I wasn’t using it so, yeah, I gave them that.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Oh okay.

Shelley Chaplin: I don’t think they have it… It’s been there for a while now. It think that was a four year loan or something like that.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I think it’s been there for longer than that.

Shelley Chaplin: It’s been there for longer than that. Or — it must be four years around about now. Went in just after Beijing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So they’ll return that to you?

Shelley Chaplin: They’ll return it at some point. I mean, I like it. It’s nice to have it there. It’s good that they have some stuff from wheelchair basketball there, and I don’t need it, so, yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How did you get into playing wheelchair basketball?

Shelley Chaplin: After the Atlanta Paralympics actually. There was a welcome home parade in Melbourne. So I never knew anything about wheelchair sports before that. And I went to the parade, and I used to walk around, but that day I used a wheelchair because I was really tired, and someone just approached me and said “Hey, do you know anything about wheelchair sports? You should get involved!” And, yeah, so I did! I tried everything, and I liked basketball the most.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And you’re a three point player?

Shelley Chaplin: Three point five.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I’d never seen the game before. My first experience of it was when the Gliders came out on the court for that first game [in London], and I was really taken with the sport from the word go. It has a sort of grace that normal basketball lacks. But otherwise it’s very similar.

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah! I think people are often quite surprised by wheelchair basketball, what it is when they actually see it. I think the name “wheelchair” basketball means disability obviously, but when you watch it there’s nothing about disability to it at all. Just that we use wheelchairs, and that’s it. It’s just another sport.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png People in the press gallery were saying “I’ve just got to get out in a chair and…”

Shelley Chaplin: Try it! Yeah!

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So how did you get to go to Illinois?

Shelley Chaplin: After the Athens Paralympics

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You won the bronze medal there?

Shelley Chaplin: No, we won silver in Athens…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Silver in Athens, bronze in Beijing.

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, while I was over there I met one of the American girls, and she was about to take up a scholarship there. And so I ended up meeting the coach, who was in Athens coaching the Canadian men’s team. So I ended up meeting him, and chatting to him about maybe going over there, and then when I got home I followed it up, and they offered me a scholarship, so I took it. So he’d already seen me play at the Paralympics, and knew who I was, so it was good.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Which lead to what we ran on the front page of Wikipedia.

Shelley Chaplin: Oh yeah! I saw that! That was great!

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png That’s why I rang up up and asked for your birth place. Somebody raised an objection, and said maybe she was born in the US.

Shelley Chaplin: Nope!

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I thought that was pretty spectacular, because there’s not a lot of athletes in any sport that have done that [been All-American without being American].

Shelley Chaplin: Cool. Definitely cool.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How did your team go while you were there?

Shelley Chaplin: While I was there we… I was there for five years. The first three years we were national champions.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png For five years from 2004 to 2009?

Shelley Chaplin: No, I didn’t actually go until 2005. So I went in August of 2005. And I finished up in May of 2010. I went to five national championships, and we won three and came runners up in two.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Wow!

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah! We had a good team.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you said you played for a club here in Melbourne as well?

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, I play for the Dandenong Rangers here. We’ve just won two championships in a row. So… hopefully three this year.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Wow!

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah! It’s pretty cool.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png That’s a pretty amazing record.

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And then of course there’s the Gliders as well. You’ve got the gold… no wait…

Shelley Chaplin: No, not the gold! Not yet! Two silvers and a bronze!

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I was sure you’d be saying “I’ve already got the silver and the bronze. Give me the gold!”

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, that’s exactly what I was saying! No, I think we just had a young team and…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Well, the team’s pretty much the same one as in Athens isn’t it?

Shelley Chaplin: No! There was probably only four players from Athens that were the same. We’ve got a lot of young players that are just sort of coming into their own in wheelchair basketball, so.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What I noticed was when I looked over the statistics of basketball over the time you’ve been playing, the scores have been going up.

Shelley Chaplin: Yes. I think that’s partly to do with that we changed to a size six ball, so we went to a women’s ball. Until 2006 we were still playing with a size seven, which is a men’s ball. So we changed that. I think that helped with our statistics, ’cause it’s easier for women to handle the ball and stuff like that. I also think there’s been a big increase in the professionalism of wheelchair basketball internationally, so you have a lot of people who are training every day for this. Whereas I know leading into Athens not everyone was training full time. But now everyone’s a full time athlete.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you are a full time athlete?

Shelley Chaplin: Yep, I was. Leading into London I was. So from halfway through 2011 till the Paralympics — so, probably a year — I was a full time athlete. So we trained three times a day, five days a week. Play on the weekends.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So you got a grant from the government?

Shelley Chaplin: Yep, the Australian Sports Commission supports us. And so does Basketball Australia obviously. […]

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png That’s pretty intense though. Have you taken a break since then?

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, since London I haven’t played any basketball. Been doing a lot of different things.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Like what?

Shelley Chaplin: Just gotten into hand cycling actually.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Oh okay.

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, so myself and one of my team mates, Leanne del Toso, who was in London as well, we have decided to do a fund raiser. So we’re going to ride around the perimeter of Fiji. And so it’s 550 kilometres in ten days. So I’m going to be on a hand cycle, and Leanne, who can walk, is going to be on a real bike. She has really weak legs. So we’re going to do that. Raise some money and awareness for women in sport.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Wow!

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, it’s really exciting.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When is that?

Shelley Chaplin: We go in June. But next month we’re going to launch a big fund raising campaign to get together all the money to do it all. But yeah, it’s pretty cool.

Shelley Chaplin’s guernsey on display at the Australian Institute of Sport.
Image: LauraHale.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you still with the basketball? Are you going to continue with that?

Shelley Chaplin: Yep! I do! So two weeks, no less than two weeks, the fourteenth of January, we go to the AIS for our first training camp of the Rio campaign.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So I might be able to catch you guys again there.

Shelley Chaplin: From the fourteenth to the seventeenth.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It must have been disappointing in London — Let me put it like this: I’m watching the game, and it’s “oh no, they’re losing” but you don’t look like you’re losing. You look like you’re having the time of your life.

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah! Definitely. I mean, what we play for is to play on the world stage and it is a lot of fun.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Did you see how many people were there was?

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, it was insane. In-sane.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I was staring up at the top and I could not see the top rows. They were completely in darkness.

Shelley Chaplin: There was so many people there, and they were all supporting us. It was so much fun. It was the best I’ve ever done. But yeah, of course it’s disappointing, because you don’t want to win silver, or lose gold, but…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The silver’s pretty good!

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, being second in the world’s pretty good, definitely, but silver’s tough.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It’s just that the Gliders have never won. They’ve never won the World Championship, they’ve never won at the Paralympics.

Shelley Chaplin: We’ve never won. Yeah, so obviously we wanted to change that. So yeah, definitely disappointing. We did what we were capable of. It wasn’t like we underperformed. We didn’t play badly. We just weren’t quite good enough.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Yeah.

Shelley Chaplin: And the Germans were very good. They worked really hard.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Really good.

Shelley Chaplin: They were very good, so…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You played pretty well.

Shelley Chaplin: We had patches where we didn’t play well, but that’s basketball.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The whole team needed to find something and lift, because like… we interviewed one of your team mates, and she we can’t expect to win if we’re shooting 39 per cent. Then of course you went ahead and won two games shooting 39 per cent, which sort of made a bit of a liar out of her…

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah, well our biggest strength was our defence, so if we can play the defence, we can.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The defence was where you won those games. You blocked them off. Particularly Mexico, they couldn’t… Canada was even better. You kept on forcing turnovers, forcing timeouts. That was the defensive game, was the way you won it.

Shelley Chaplin: Absolutely.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png But Germany had a good defensive game as well. It must have been good, playing on your birthday.

Shelley Chaplin: It was really cool. The whole team, the whole Australian Paralympic team wished me happy birthday, the whole crowd sang me happy birthday and this sort of stuff. It was pretty special, but once you get into it, it’s just another game. I know all the people were talking about the fact that it was my birthday, but it didn’t [get to me]. It was fun. It was fun. Not a bad place to have your birthday.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png So how do you compare London with Beijing and Athens?

Shelley Chaplin: Well, I think every games gets a little bit better anyway. Like, Beijing was better than Athens and I think London was a lot better than Beijing again. But I think the special thing about London is that it was British, and so they obviously support Australians, but we were just athletes to them, I think. Whereas in Beijing we were still disabled athletes. But in London we were just athletes and they loved our sport and they understood our sport, which was really cool. The crowds… it was amazing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png We have a lot of statistics on the response to it. Unfortunately, being in London I couldn’t see the TV coverage.

Shelley Chaplin: Back here the ABC did a fantastic job with us. Everybody knows about the Paralympics. Everybody saw something.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Apparently there was extra requests for the Gliders. So more people wanted to see you.

Shelley Chaplin: People like basketball. Basketball is very easy to relate to. Team sports are good to watch. But I think, like I was saying earlier, if you take away the wheelchair, there’s nothing to do with disabilities. If an able bodied jumped into a wheelchair, it’s exactly the same as us. Whereas an able bodied can’t run against someone with blades. You know?

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Yes.

Shelley Chaplin: So I think that’s why; it’s very relatable, and obviously it’s fun to watch.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It seems be be getting bigger with each set of games.

Shelley Chaplin: Definitely.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I’ve got figures from Google. London is twice as big.

Shelley Chaplin: Yep. Absolutely. The Paralympic movement is exciting because we’re all amateur athletes, and we’re all doing it because we love the sport. I think, during Beijing, I know in the Australian media they tried to get everyone to look away from our disabilities and look at us just as athletes, but I think in London they were like, here’s their disabilities, here’s what they are doing athletically, and combining the two, which made for amazing coverage, right? Cause everyone understood our disabilities but our sport as well.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Some of the things you were doing. The three point shot from a chair.

Shelley Chaplin: Yeah.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And the speed at which you moved at times, in excess of what someone without a chair could do. It’s just a fabulous sport.

Shelley Chaplin: I think so!

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you’re definitely up for Rio as well?

Shelley Chaplin: Yep. Definitely. Obviously, it will be my fourth games and I was going to retire after London, but I’m still good enough to do it, and I’m young, I’m only only 28. So, yeah, I think I can play another games in me. The Paralympic movement as I was saying is so exciting right now. I can’t even imagine what Rio is going to be like. It’s going to be massive. Yeah, I want to be part of it. And representing your country is a big deal.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Well I look forward to seeing you there. Thanks very much!

Shelley Chaplin: No worries!



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September 8, 2012

Gliders defeat USA in 2012 Paralympic semifinals

Gliders defeat USA in 2012 Paralympic semifinals

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Saturday, September 8, 2012

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

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Gliders use defensive tactics to slow the USA down
Image: Laura Hale.

Australian supporters in the crowd wearing yellow Gliders T-shirts
Image: Laura Hale.

Merritt during a time out
Image: Laura Hale.

Gliders link arms for the national anthem
Image: Laura Hale.

Oops! An American goes down.
Image: Laura Hale.

Team USA have nice warm-up outfits
Image: Laura Hale.

London, England — The Australian women’s national wheelchair basketball team, the Gliders, defeated the USA Thursday in a 40–39 thriller at the North Greenwich Arena.

This semifinal victory advances the Gliders into the final, where they are to meet the winner of the day’s match between the Netherlands and Germany. They are guaranteed at least silver. The Gliders won silver in Sydney in 2000 and Athens in 2004 and bronze in Beijing in 2008, but have never won the gold. The USA team is to meet the loser of that match to contest the bronze.

The Gliders’ quest for Paralympic gold medals began last week with a narrow 52–50 defeat of Brazil. The Aussies then crushed Great Britain 51–24. Australia had a loss to Canada 50–57, but bounced back to win against the Netherlands, 58–49. This advanced Australia to the quarter final, where the Gliders met and defeated Mexico 62–37.

Team USA started by defeating France 63–24 in its first game. It then lost to Germany, 54–48. It came back and defeated Mexico 67–33. Team USA came from 21 behind to defeat China in extra time, and played Canada and won in the quarter final 67–55.

The first quarter got off to an exciting start. USA had first possession and chalked up the first score. Kylie Gauchi responded quickly with a good shot, leveling the score. Then followed an exciting passage of play in which USA turned the ball over, but Clare Nott lost it on a bad pass. Shelly Chaplin then stole it back but Kylie Gauchi put it out of bounds. Clare Nott stole it back again, only to have Gauichi turn it over again. The USA took a shot at the basket from inside the paint, but missed. They then took a rebound and finally scored. A USA free throw extended their lead to 2–6. Thereafter both teams’ shooting was poor, and the score was only 10–12 at quarter time.

The second quarter started with Merritt scoring twice to give Australia the lead 14–12. A ferocious Australian defence saw USA’s style severely cramped, and they turned the ball over a number of times. They also took too long to move the ball forward. The crowd included the familiar block of Gliders fans in yellow T-shirts. They made their presence felt, chanting “Defence, Gliders, Defence!” whenever USA had the ball. Unfortunately, the Gliders’ poor shooting prevented them from fully capitalising on their superb defence, leaving the score tied at 26–26 at half time.

In the third quarter, an early goal by Kylie Gauchi from outside the paint gave the Gliders the lead. A series of steals gave the Gliders additional shots at goal, most of which missed, but USA had no answer to the Australian defence, with a series of timeouts and turnovers, and their shooting was even poorer. While the Australians relentlessly racked up point after point, taking a 32–26 lead, USA were unable to score at all until the last minute of the quarter. A hurried goal with seconds to go by Katie Hill saw the Gliders leading 38–28 at the last change.

In the fourth quarter, the Australian defence remained taut, but the shooting remained terrible. In the final accounting, Cobi Crispin only made 3 out of 10 shots, and Amber Merritt only 4 out of 16. The Glider’s most accurate shot turned out to be Clare Nott, who made four out of five attempts. Meanwhile, an increasingly desperate USA team pegged the Australians back to 40–39. Three timeouts were taken in the last minute. Fouls saw Merritt sent to the free throw line, but she missed both shots. The game went down to the last second, with USA missing a shot from inside the paint, before the shot clock ran out.



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July 21, 2012

Australian Gliders squeak out first place victory over Germany women\’s national wheelchair team

Australian Gliders squeak out first place victory over Germany women’s national wheelchair team

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Saturday, July 21, 2012

Homebush Bay, New South Wales —

The German side during player introductions
Image: LauraHale.

Both sides listen while the German national anthem is played
Image: LauraHale.

The game’s opening tip off
Image: LauraHale.

Cobi Crispin gets a wheel change
Image: LauraHale.

Germany’s Marina Mohnen lines up her shot
Image: LauraHale.

Australia’s Kylie Gauci passes the ball over Germany’s Gesche Schünemann
Image: LauraHale.

Yesterday, the Australian Gliders beat the German women’s national wheelchair basketball team 48–46 in the first place match at the Rollers & Gliders World Challenge taking place at the Sport Centre at the Sydney Olympic Park.

The two teams were close most of the game, with the first quarter ending 11–6 Germany, second quarter ending tied 19–19 and the third quarter ending 31–27. In the fourth, both teams had on court issues: the Australians got caught out several times because of shot clock violations. Meanwhile, the Germans had earned two personal fouls by the 8:43 mark, then four total by the 7:01 mark when they were behind 35–33.

The Australians pulled ahead to 40–33 with 6:01 remaining in the game, but then earned their first personal foul of the quarter at the 5:35 mark. By the 3:05 mark with the game at 42–38, Australia had four personal fouls, with Shelley Chaplin having four total in the game. Germany had a fast break in the second minute with Gesche Schünemann capitalizing on it to score and bring the game to 42–40. On another fast break opportunity, Germany again scored with Edina Muller leveling the score at 42–42. German frustration set in at the 1:18 mark when Marina Mohnen got a technical foul for unsportsman-like conduct, and then topped that off with a second technical foul. Following Australia’s four attempted free throw attempts, they led 45–42. Australia’s Cobi Crispin fouled a German player which resulted in Crispin being sent off for having five personals. The Germans capitalized on one free throw, which brought the score to 45–43. Germany tied the game up at 46–46 by the :21 second mark. With :08.5 seconds left, Amber Merrit scored for Australia bringing the score to 48–46. The score remained the same in the few remaining seconds, leaving Australia the winners.

The Gliders start their London Paralympics campaign on August 30 against Brazil.



Related news

  • “Australian Gliders glide past China women’s national wheelchair basketball team” — Wikinews, July 20, 2012
  • “Australian Rollers roll over Great Britain men’s wheelchair basketball team” — Wikinews, July 19, 2012
  • “Australian Gliders beat Germany women’s national wheelchair basketball team on day two of Rollers & Gliders World Challenge” — Wikinews, July 19, 2012

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July 20, 2012

Australian Gliders glide past China women\’s national wheelchair basketball team

Australian Gliders glide past China women’s national wheelchair basketball team

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Friday, July 20, 2012

Homebush Bay, New South Wales —

Australia and China battle for the ball following a missed shot
Image: Bidgee.

A Chinese player warms up before the game
Image: LauraHale.

The Rollers warm up before the game
Image: LauraHale.

Leanne del Toso in yellow joins her teammates on the floor during player introductions
Image: LauraHale.

Amber Merritt in green joins her teammates on the floor during player introductions
Image: LauraHale.

The Rollers bring the ball down the floor during the game
Image: LauraHale.

Cobi Crispin shoots the ball
Image: LauraHale.

Earlier today, the Australian Gliders beat the Chinese women’s national wheelchair basketball team 57–45 at the Rollers & Gliders World Challenge taking place at the Sport Centre at the Sydney Olympic Park.

China won the game’s opening tip off but did not score in their first time down the floor. Australia’s Sarah Stewart took and missed Australia’s first shot. China’s 1.5 point player Li Yanhua eventually made the game’s first basket. Cobi Crispin made Australia’s first basket at 6:55 left in the first quarter, successfully turning her basket into a three point play by making her free throw as a result of a personal foul. Aggressive first quarter play resulted in four Chinese personal fouls with 5:21 left. The first quarter ended 13–9 in China’s favour.

The first half ended 24–20, with China leading. China’s lead came with a high level of energy, the bench loudly supporting their players, few substitutions, lots of on the court talk, playing a half court game that involved setting up the defense early and fouling. In contrast, Australia played a different first half. The team did not yell from the bench or on the court, had many substitutions, ran the shot clock down and played a full court defense.

The second half contrasted visibly with the first. Fewer fouls were made by both teams. Australia continued to run the shot clock down but their bench woke up, started cheering loudly for their teammates and made fewer substitutions. The Australians tied the game 34–34 with 1:54 left in the third quarter. China’s answer to the closer game was to start substituting players. Tactically, things were little changed as neither team changed their defensive game. The game was tied again at 9:01 left in the fourth with a score of 38–38. Australia was up 42–38 at 7:14 left in the fourth. Some of China’s defensive difficulties continued to hold them back, including a player who entered the box early for a second time during a free throw shot by an Australian player.

The Gliders will play tomorrow at 2:30pm Sydney time in the first place match against an opponent to be determined in a game later today between Germany and Japan.


Related news

  • “Australian Rollers roll over Great Britain men’s wheelchair basketball team” — Wikinews, July 19, 2012
  • “Australian Gliders beat Germany women’s national wheelchair basketball team on day two of Rollers & Gliders World Challenge” — Wikinews, July 19, 2012

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This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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