Wiki Actu en

March 28, 2014

Planned Parenthood asks Arizona federal judge for injunction

Planned Parenthood asks Arizona federal judge for injunction

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, March 28, 2014

Health
Related articles

Health
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The Planned Parenthood Federation of America is asking US federal District Judge David C. Bury to grant an injunction against a new Arizona abortion law. On Wednesday Planned Parenthood and Arizona attorney Mike Tryon were in court to present their arguments.

The law passed in 2012 would take effect on April 1. According to Planned Parenthood, if the law takes effect, it will prevent some women from having an abortion. The Arizona state Attorney General’s Office states it is only regulating one form of abortion.

Abortions are usually medical abortions, meaning medication is taken to induce abortion. The new law would only allow use of abortion medication just as approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or specified by the product label. It would also require they administer the medication before seven weeks into the pregnancy. Previous cut off time was set at nine weeks. It would also require the medication be administered at the abortion facility. Planned Parenthood says requiring administration at the facility is a problem particularly for those outside of cities, as the medication is administered over several days.

Medical abortions commonly combine two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol. These two drugs are taken together. Doctors don’t usually give them at the “on-label” dosage. For abortions misoprostol is given at a higher amount than the label says. Planned Parenthood says when it is given at the lower level the abortions may be unsuccessful and require surgery, putting the woman at additional risk. The other drug mifepristone has the opposite problem. The FDA has not updated their approval since 2000. The FDA approval is for a larger dose. Most doctors use the two together. They have found that when the two are combined they are just as effective as mifepristone alone, at the higher dose. Planned Parenthood says the combination of the two is the safest way to have an abortion.

The state says this law is part of their responsibility to protect public health.

The Judge is expected to rule before April 1, when the law would take effect.


Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 16, 2006

Repeal of ministerial control of RU486 bill passes Australian House of Representatives

Repeal of ministerial control of RU486 bill passes Australian House of Representatives

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, February 16, 2006

The Australian House of Representatives have considered the bill regarding whether the Australian Health Minister Tony Abbott, or the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) regulate the abortifacient mifepristone (RU486), and has passed the bill unamended.

Earlier today, the Prime Minister John Howard (Australian Liberal Party, Bennelong) has spoken on the amendments earlier proposed by Jackie Kelly (Liberal, Lindsay) and Andrew Laming (Liberal, Bowman), speaking in favour of the Laming amendments and reiterating his support for Abbott, stating that he is the “best friend that Medicare ever had”, Abbott’s usual phrase he states in Question Time in support of the Government’s handling of Medicare.

Howard’s counterpart, the Leader of the Opposition, Kim Beazley (Australian Labor Party, Brand), spoke in support of the bill in its unamended form, noting that it is “simply commonsense that the minister does not have the scientific capacity” to evaluate the drug, and reiterating that the bill is “not really about Tony Abbott”. More controversially he however said that those with certain personal views such as Tony Abbott’s conservative Catholic faith should not hold certain offices in Government, which drew criticism from the Government later in the debate noting that an earlier Labor Prime Minister of Australia John Curtin’s pacificism was a strong wartime leader.

Later, the Kelly amendments were put to the vote and were lost on the voices and in subsequent division with 49 agreeing to the amendments and 96 disagreeing. The vote on whether the bill should be read a second time 95 for to 50 against. In the consideration in detail stage, the Laming amendments were debated, but the vote on these amendments were lost with 56 supporting the amendments and 90 against them.

The bill as unamended was agreed to and passed the third reading on the voices, without having to resort to a vote.

Reactions from Australian bloggers

Larvatus Prodeo (LP) blogger “Kate” welcomed the decision, but warned that the abortion issue was far from settled. “Personally, I think this is not only a good thing for women in Australia, but also demonstrates democratic processes at work. Now we can commence stoushing about whether or not the TGA should allow the drug into the country,” she said.

One commenter on LP, Paul Norton, suggested that division over the issue would deepen in the next few years, and that people opposed to legalised abortion would become more vocal. “I expect that the loud minority will become louder over the next couple of years, and more authoritarian and fanatical in their attempts to twist legislators’ and candidates’ arms, until State and Federal election results show that their loudness is directly proportional to their minority status amongst Australians.”

Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • ABC NewsRadio broadcasts of the House of Representatives, February 16, 2006.
  • Australian House of Representatives, Hansard, February 16, 2006. (available from February 17, 2006)

External links

  • Kate. “The Vote is In” — Larvatus Prodeo (blog), February 16, 2006
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 15, 2006

RU486 debate complicates with amendments posed in Australian House of Representatives

RU486 debate complicates with amendments posed in Australian House of Representatives

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, February 15, 2006

The ongoing debate over whether the Australian Health Minister Tony Abbott, or the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) regulate the abortifacient mifepristone (RU486) has complicated with a number of members proposing amendments to the Senate bill, now in the House of Representatives.

Jackie Kelly (Australian Liberal Party, Lindsay) has said that “There should be a transparent process in which the minister is accountable for his or her decision” on so-called restricted goods (of which RU486 is such a good) as listed in the TGA legislation. Kelly has proposed an amendment with points stating that “the Minister for Health and Ageing continuing to have the decision making role in relation to the approval of restricted goods…”, “the Minister being required to obtain written advice from the Therapeutic Goods Administration prior to giving written approval or refusal to approve”, “the Minister’s decision being subject to disallowance”.

In the debate on February 14, Andrew Laming (Liberal, Bowman) noted his intent to propose an amendment in the later consideration in detail stage, noting his views that the TGA process is “so far removed…from the concerns and the beliefs of the community” and that he is “unable to convince [himself] that completely leaving these decisions to the TGA is the right thing to do”. His amendment loosely aims to propose a “disallowable instrument in Parliament where there is a disagreement with the findings of the TGA.”

The introduction of amendments has caused confusion on procedural matters February 15 in the Questions to the Speaker period (that follows Question Time), where members can ask questions of the Speaker on procedural and other technical matters. In the following vote on the proposed legislation, if one of the votes on the amendments succeeds, this has the effect of discontinuing the other amendment proposals, as each of the amendments proposed has the effect of being a complete alternative bill.

The RU486 debate will have precedence over all other matters in the House until it is dealt with. Voting is expected on Thursday.

Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Australian House of Representatives Hansard, February 14, 2005.
  • ABC NewsRadio broadcasts of the House of Representatives, February 15, 2005.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 9, 2006

Repeal of ministerial control of RU486 bill passes Australian Senate

Repeal of ministerial control of RU486 bill passes Australian Senate

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, February 9, 2006

The bill on whether the Australian Federal Health Minster Tony Abbott should not exercise ministerial control of the abortifacient RU486 has passed the Australian Senate February 9, 2006. If the bill passes the Australian House of Representatives, the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) will exercise control and evaluation of the suitability of the drug for use in Australia.

Senators were allowed a free vote on the issue. The result of the vote on the third reading, the final stage of the bill, was 45 for to 28 in favour of TGA exercising control. 23 of the 26 female senators voted in favour of the bill, while numbers were more evenly split between the male senators; 21 of them voted for the bill and 25 were against.

The bill will be debated in the House of Representatives on February 14, 2006.

Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Australian Senate Hansard (pdf), February 9, 2006.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 8, 2006

RU486 debate enters Australian Senate

RU486 debate enters Australian Senate – Wikinews, the free news source

RU486 debate enters Australian Senate

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, February 8, 2006

Wikinews Australia has in-depth coverage of this issue: RU486 (abortion pill) debate

The looming debate on whether the Australian Health Minister Tony Abbott or the Theraputic Goods Administration (TGA) should regulate mifepristone, RU486, has entered the Australian Senate, February 8. A free vote is due to be conducted on this issue.

The first speakers have been all women speaking in support of passing control from the Health Minister to the TGA: Australian National Party Senator Fiona Nash, Australian Democrats Senator Lyn Allison, Australian Labor Party Senator Claire Moore. They have drawn attention to the fact that abortion is already legal in Australia, the inappropriateness of a Parliament minister to regulate a single drug versus a scientific and independent body, and if RU486 is an unsafe drug then the TGA will not approve the drug. Petitions were presented by Moore with the undersigned stating “medical experts, not the health minister” should regulate the drug.

Australian Liberal Party Senator Gary Humphries then spoke, stating that the bill is a “mistake”, not because of the possible risks, or that the TGA is unfit to perform the evaluation, but because RU486 is “not just another drug”, “facilitating a medical procedure that is not just a medical procedure”. Australian Greens Senator Kerry Nettle spoke in favour of the bill, making mention of views of others on the supposed push polling of some groups opposing the bill. Liberal Senator Nick Minchin, the new Leader of the Government in the Senate, spoke in support of Humphries and his views, and “was not persuaded to support [the] bill”, and expressed his “conservative” views that life begun “from conception onwards”. Family First Party Senator Steven Fielding spoke out against the bill also, likening the TGA as comprising of “unelected bureaucrats”. He further commented that Family First cannot consider the social policy issues without considering social views, and drew attention to the TGA’s response in the earlier Senate inquiry that the TGA “cannot consider social and ethical issues”. Fielding drew attention to the guillotine being placed on the debate of the bill and the attitudes of the non-Government senators earlier criticising the Government on the industrial relations legislation being “rammed through” late last year.

Other senators, including Guy Barnett (Lib.), Helen Polley (Labor), also later spoke against the bill; Senators Judith Adams (Lib.), Ruth Webber (Labor) spoke in support.

Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • ABC NewsRadio broadcasts of the Senate, February 8, 2006
  • Australian Senate Hansard (pdf), February 8, 2006.

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Mifepristone


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 3, 2006

RU486 Abortion pill hearings begin in Australia

RU486 Abortion pill hearings begin in Australia

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, February 3, 2006

Mifepristone

An Australian Senate inquiry into the abortion pill “RU486” has started public hearings in Melbourne. A controversial conscience vote on the issue to overturn laws which prohibit Australian women’s access to the drug, will be held in Federal parliament on February 9.

The Senate committee is considering a bill to remove ministerial control of the abortifacient drug Mifepristone – or RU486. Health Minister Tony Abbott says the issue of whether to allow women access to the drug “is one of principle.” Abbott, who is against abortion, insists he is the right person to control the drug’s use in Australia.

Besides its use internationally as an “abortion pill”, there may also be a small chance that it may help treat various other medical disorders including prostate cancer, breast cancer, and inoperable brain tumours amongst other conditions. Mifepristone is effectively banned in Australia, with Minister Abbott controlling whether it is made available.

The bill, sponsored by a group of female senators and MPs, would hand Mr Abbott’s powers over to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) – the body that controls all other pharmaceutical drugs in Australia. The bill seeks to have the TGA determine the drug’s availability and not the Health Minister.

Democrats Leader Lyn Allison, said she was “cautiously confident” the parliament will overturn the current arrangements when the conscience vote takes place. “Those who are in favour of the bill are saying this is a choice that ought to be available to women and that on the basis of the studies that have been done overseas it is at least as safe as surgical termination,” Senator Allison said.

Reproductive Choice Australia (RCA)say that medicine is placed at the whim of politics, saying that over 80% of Australians are pro-choice. A national survey found 87% of women aged 18 to 49 support a woman’s right to choose.

RU486 is available in much of western Europe and North America, but was effectively banned in Australia under laws initiated by now-retired pro-life senator Brian Harradine.

Christine Read, medical director of family planning group FPA Health, said Misoprostol, also known as Cytotec, is across the world to invoke contractions to expel the fetus after a woman had taken RU486. “It is used extensively in obstetrics and gynaecology for termination of pregnancy and to induce labour, so it’s used in the medical management of miscarriage,” Dr Read said.

Dr Sharman Stone, said yesterday the issue was not about Misoprostol, but rather that “the TGA should make the decision about any drugs – that is its job. Any other conversations about other drugs are simply irrelevant to this argument,” Dr Stone said.

Family First senator Steve Fielding says lifting a ban on RU486 would pave the way for do-it-yourself home abortions. “RU486 is different to other drugs in that it is an abortion drug which could see do-it-yourself home abortions,” he said in a statement. “The question is, should policy be made by bureaucrats or our elected leaders?

Senator Fielding claims Australians are worried about the high number of abortions in Australia, as reflected in submissions received by the Senate committee.

On Monday the committee will move to Sydney for a final day of hearings.

Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Mifepristone
Wikinews Australia has in-depth coverage of this issue: RU486 (abortion pill) debate
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 18, 2006

Australian senate inquiry receives 4,000 submisions on abortion pill

Australian senate inquiry receives 4,000 submisions on abortion pill

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, January 18, 2006

Wikinews Australia has in-depth coverage of this issue: RU486 (abortion pill) debate

The Australian Senate has been flooded with submissions into an inquiry about the possible use of the abortion drug Mifepristone (known as RU486) in Australia.

The senate committee is to consider a private members bill, introduced by a group of female senators and MPs to strip the Australian health minister of his control over the drug. If successful, the drug would then have to be approved by the Threrapeutic Goods Administration before it would be allowed to be used in Australia.

Senator Fiona Nash of the Nationals argues that the bill is not about abortion but about process. She said “What’s been put forward here is who is best able to judge the quality, safety and efficacy of this particular drug and who is best able to judge whether it should be used in Australia”.

Ms Nash believes that the TGA should be responsible for allowing or denying the use of drugs in Australia, not the health minister.

Lyn Elisson, leader of the Democrats said that only around 2,000 of the submissions would be considered as the remainder do not meet the senate’s terms of reference. She also said “This bill is not about the morality or legality of abortion.

“It’s really about whether the Minister for Health should have the power of veto over an alternative to legal surgical abortion.”

National’s senator Barnaby Joyce argues that all opinions should be taken into account and that the enquiry should be conducted for at least a week.

Peter Slipper, MP for the Liberal party claims that the proposed legislation can not be separated from the RU486 issue. He told ABC radio “I believe it would be a negation of our responsibility if we were to flick the decision to an unelected body, an unaccountable body, such as the TGA.”

It is believed that only 100 submissions are from those supporting the use of RU486.

The inquiry has received international attention with submissions from the US, New Zealand and Austria. This pill has been available for use in France since 1988, in Switzerland since 1999.


Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Mifepristone

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress