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May 15, 2011

Azerbaijan win 2011 Eurovision Song Contest

Azerbaijan win 2011 Eurovision Song Contest

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Sunday, May 15, 2011

Eurovision Song Contest
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The Esprit Arena, the venue for the contest

Azerbaijan has won the 2011 Eurovision Song Contest in Düsseldorf, Germany. Duo Ell & Nikki, which consists of Eldar Gasimov and Nigar Jamal, won the contest with 221 points after their performence of Running Scared. This is the first time that Azerbaijan has won the contest, they first appeared in 2008. Italy took second place and Sweden finished third.

Commenting on their country’s win the pair said “the one thing we want to say is, we just love you. Thank you for your support”. Gasimov continued to say that he was “the happiest man in the world”.

Azerbaijan received the maximum of 12 points from three countries, Russia, Turkey, and Malta.

Ukraine came fourth in the contest and fifth place went to Denmark. Switzerland came in last with 19 points. Host and last year’s winner Germany finished in tenth place. Other countries that participated in the final include Bosnia and Herzegovina, Greece, Ireland, Georgia, the United Kingdom, Moldova, Slovenia, Serbia, France, Russia, Romania, Austria, Lithuania, Iceland, Finland, Hungary, Spain, and Estonia.

Two semi-final heats were held in the days before the final to determine which acts would proceed to the final. Greece and Sweden won the semi-finals with 133 and 155 points. The countries that failed to make it to the final are Malta, Armenia, Turkey, Albania, Croatia, San Marino, Norway, Portugal, Poland, Belgium, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Belarus, Israel, F.Y.R Macedonia, Latvia, Cyprus, and the Netherlands



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May 21, 2008

Eurovision 2008: First semi-final held in Belgrade

Eurovision 2008: First semi-final held in Belgrade

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Wednesday, May 21, 2008

A unique behind the camera view of performer Isis Gee at the first semifinal of the ESC 2008.

Last night saw the first semi final of this year’s Eurovision Song Contest in Belgrade, Serbia. The entries from Israel, Azerbaijan, Norway, Poland, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Armenia, Finland, Romania, Russia and Greece are through to the final, leaving the representatives from Montenegro, Estonia, Moldova, San Marino, Belgium, Slovenia, Ireland, Andorra and the Netherlands failing to qualify for this weekend’s final.

The aforementioned countries join host nation Serbia, automatically through as is last year’s winner, and the ‘big four’ – the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Spain. The other entries will compete in the second semi final tomorrow. Below is a summary of each entry in running order:

Montenegro

Montenegro was represented by Stefan Filipović with the Montenegrin-language song Zauvijek Volim Te (Never Forget I Love You), which was written by Grigor Koprov and Ognen Nedelkovski. He failed to qualify.

Estonia

Comedy act Kreisiraadio (crazy radio) represented Estonia with Leto Svet. One member of the trio is a former politician, and a second is a current one. The song was the first Estonian entry to be in neither the Estonian or English languages. Instead, the song was mostly in Serbo-Croatian with sections in German and Finnish. They failed to qualify for the final.

Moldova

Geta Burlacu performed A Century Of Love to represent Moldova. The song, written by Oleg Baraliuc and Viorica Demici, failed to qualify.

San Marino

San Marino, which is entirely surrounded by Italy and has a population of 31,000, debuted at the contest this year. The nation’s first representative was Miodio with Complice. Described as “a melodic song from our tradition” by Sanmarinese Eurovision delegation head Alessandro Capicchioni, failed to qualify.

Belgium

Ishtar represented Belgium with O Julissi. The song, composed by band member Michel Vangheluwe, bears the unusual distincton of being sung entirely in a language which does not actually exist. Sung by frontwoman Soetkin Baptist the words “kolosali krokodili” bear a resemblance to English, while the rest are designed to resemble Ukrainian and Serbian. It was hoped this would appeal to those in the Balkans and the former Soviet Union, but the song failed to qualify.

Israel

Israel was represented by Bo’az Ma’uda performing The Fire in Your Eyes. He sang alongside five backing singers whilst wearing a silvery-blue vest. Many members of the live audience could be seen waving Israeli flags. He won a place in the final with his song, which was written by Dana International and Shai Kerem.

Azerbaijan

Elnur Huseynov and Samir Javadzadeh represented Azerbaijan with Day After Day, which was written by Govhar Hasanzadeh and lyrics by Zahra Badalbeyli. The performance featured backing performers clad in large ‘angel’ wings, as was one of the performers. The song has won a place in the final.

Norway

Norway was represented by Maria Haukaas Storeng singing Hold On Be Strong, which was written by Mira Craig. Almost a million Norwegian viewers tuned in to watch the singer win a place in the final. Both her and songwriter Craig expressed delight at being chosen to go through to the final.

Poland

Isis Gee represented Poland with For Life, which she wrote herself. A simple performance was all that was required to secure a place in the final.

Ireland

Dustin the Turkey represented Ireland with a controversial performance that garnered some boos from the crowd. The comedy puppet sang Irelande Douze Pointe (Ireland 12 points) which despite the mock-French title is actually in English. A number of Irish news organisations were highly critical of the performance, but the bird told Irish state TV he was “disgusted” by the fact that the song failed to get into the final.

Andorra

Gisela represented Andorra with Casanova, composed by Jordi Cubino. She failed to qualify.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Elvir Laković Laka sang Pokušaj to represent Bosnia and Herzegovina. The song was selected to proceed to the final.

Armenia

Sirusho was able to earn Armenia a spot in the final with Qele, the lyrics for which she wrote herself while the music was written by H.A. Der-Hovagimian.

The Netherlands

Hind Laroussi represented Holland with Your Heart Belongs To Me but failed to qualify. She later said she found this anoying “especially when you see that a country like Azerbaijan makes it”.

Finland

Finland was represented by heavy metal band Teräsbetoni with the song Missä Miehet Ratsastaa, Finland having earned their only win in 2006 with a similar entrant, hard rock band Lordi. The song, which was written by the band’s frontman Jarkko Ahola, was accompanied by large amounts of pyrotechnics and the band were in their self-described “leather and skin” look. Despite Eurovision fans placing them outside the top ten in an advance poll and 62% of responders in a Helsingin Sanomat poll also doubting the band would qualify, the song earned a place in the final.

Romania

Nico and Vlad Mirita were the Romanian representatives with Pe-o Margine De Lume. The song went through to the final.

Russia

Dima Bilan, who came second in the final in 2006, represented Russia again, this time with Believe. He was joined by champion figure skater Evgenii Plushenko, who has never performed at a song contest before. The song qualified for the final.

Greece

Kalomira was the Greek entrant with Secret Combination, written by Konstantinos Pantzis and Poseidon Yannopoulos. She qualified for the final.



Related news

  • “Teräsbetoni frontman J. Ahola on representing Finland at Eurovision 2008 & more” — Wikinews, April 13, 2008
  • “Heavy metal band Teräsbetoni to represent Finland at Eurovision 2008” — Wikinews, March 2, 2008

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 23, 2006

Michael Schumacher breaks Formula One record for most poles

Filed under: AutoArchived,Europe,Formula One,Nico Rosberg,San Marino,Sports — admin @ 5:00 am

Michael Schumacher breaks Formula One record for most poles

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Sunday, April 23, 2006

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Bologna, Italia – Michael Schumacher has set the Formula One pole record. “Schumi” won the pole position at the San Marino Grand Prix. The pole position was the 66th for Schumacher. Ayrton Senna held the previous record. Senna won his F1-career 65 pole positions between years 1984-1994. Schumacher has been racing in the F1-series since 1991. Senna won 40% of his pole attempts (161 races) compared to Schumacher’s 28% (235 races so far). This new pole record reawakened the affection for Senna who died in 1994 on the fifth lap at the same race, the San Marino Grand Prix, a race won by Schumacher who was also champion the same year.

Results of timetrial

Starting Order

1. Michael Schumacher Ferrari
2. Jenson Button Honda
3. Rubens Barrichello Honda
4. Felipe Massa Ferrari
5. Fernando Alonso Renault
6. Ralf Schumacher Toyota
7. Juan Pablo Montoya McLaren
8. Kimi Räikkönen McLaren
9. Jarno Trulli Toyota
10. Mark Webber Williams
11. Giancarlo Fisichella Renault
12. Jacques Villeneuve BMW-Sauber
13. Nico Rosberg Williams
14. David Coulthard Red Bull
15. Nick Heidfeld BMW-Sauber
16. Vitantonio Liuzzi Squderia Toro Rosso
17. Christian Klien Red Bull
18. Scott Speed Squderia Toro Rosso
19. Tiago Monteiro MF1
20. Christijan Albers MF1
21. Takuma Sato Super Aguri
22. Yuji Ide Super Aguri

Results of 3rd part of the time trial

1. Michael Schumacher 1.22,795
2. Jenson Button 1.22,988
3. Rubens Barrichello 1.23,242
4. Felipe Massa 1.23,702
5. Fernando Alonso 1.23,709
6. Ralf Schumacher 1.23,772
7. Juan Pablo Montoya 1.24,021
8. Kimi Räikkönen 1.24,158
9. Jarno Trulli 1.24,172
10. Mark Webber 1.24,795

Results of 2nd part of the time trial

1. Michael Schumacher 1.22,579
2. Kimi Räikkönen 1.23,190
3. Ralf Schumacher 1.23,565
4. Felipe Massa 1.23,595
5. Mark Webber 1.23,718
6. Jarno Trulli 1.23,727
7. Fernando Alonso 1.23,748
8. Jenson Button 1.23,749
9. Rubens Barrichello 1.23,760
10. Juan Pablo Montoya 1.23,760
11. Giancarlo Fisichella 1.23,771
12. Jacques Villeneuve 1.23,887
13. Nico Rosberg 1.23,966
14. David Coulthard 1.24,101
15. Nick Heidfeld 1.24,129
16. Vitantonio Liuzzi 1.24,520

Results of first part of the time trial

1. Fernando Alonso 1.23,536
2. Kimi Räikkönen 1.24,259
3. Ralf Schumacher 1.24,370
4. Giancarlo Fisichella 1.24,434
5. Jarno Trulli 1.24,446
6. Jenson Button 1.24,480
7. Nico Rosberg 1.24,495
8. Michael Schuamcher 1.24,598
9. Rubens Barrichello 1.24,727
10. David Coulthard 1.24,849
11. Vitantonio Liuzzi 1.24,879
12. Felipe Massa 1.24,884
13. Juan Pablo Montoya 1.24,960
14. Mark Webber 1.24,992
15. Jacques Villeneuve 1.25,081
16. Nick Heidfeld 1.25,410
17. Christian Klien 1.25,410
18. Scott Speed 1.25,437
19. Tiago Monteiro 1.26,820
20. Christijan ALbers 1.27,088
21. Takuma Sato 1.27,609
22. Yuji Ide 1.29,282


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September 7, 2005

UN holding recruitment exams in under-represented countries

UN holding recruitment exams in under-represented countries

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Wednesday, September 7, 2005

In order to find P-2 level officers for the United Nations Secretariat, the international organization is holding competitive recruitment competitions in 42 countries. The examinations will take place in February, 2006.

Six occupational groups are being sought: Architecture, Demography, Library, Security, Science and Technology, and Statistics. There will be a written examination (both a general paper and a specialised paper) and an interview.

The written examination questions are given in English and French, the two working languages of the Secretariat. Candidates must write their answers for the general paper in English or French. However, they may write their answers for the specialized paper in English, French, or any of the other four official languages of the Secretariat, i.e., Arabic, Chinese, Russian, or Spanish.

The examinations will take place on February 28, 2006 in New York, Addis Ababa, Andorra La Vella, Athens, Bangkok, Beirut, Geneva, Monaco, Nairobi, Santiago, Vaduz, Valletta, and Vienna.

According to the UN, applicants “should hold at least a first-level university degree relevant to the occupational group in which they would like to take the examination. Furthermore, applicants should not be more than 32 years old on 31 December, 2006 … Fluency in either English or French is required.”

The following countries have been selected for the 2006 competition: Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Saudi Arabia, Barbados, Botswana, Brunei Darussalam, Cabo Verde, Comores, Republic of Korea, Gambia, Japan, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Equatorial Guinea, Israel, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Liechtenstein, Maldives, Malta, San Marino, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Norway, Oman, Panama, Portugal, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Tonga, Tuvalu, USA, and Vietnam.

The practice of scouting under-represented nations for highly-qualified employees is an annual occurrence.

The United Nations Secretariat is one of the principal organs of the United Nations and it is headed by the United Nations Secretary General and assisted by a staff of international civil servants worldwide. It provides studies, information, and facilities needed by United Nations bodies for their meetings. It also carries out tasks as directed by the UN Security Council, the UN General Assembly, the UN Economic and Social Council, and other UN bodies. The United Nations Charter provides that the staff be chosen by application of the “highest standards of efficiency, competence, and integrity,” with due regard for the importance of recruiting on a wide geographical basis.

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March 10, 2005

United Nations passes Declaration on human cloning

United Nations passes Declaration on human cloning

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Thursday, March 10, 2005

The declaration was passed at the UN general assembly

A divided UN General Assembly has voted to approve a nonbinding statement against all forms of human cloning.

The vote, held Tuesday, came after four years of debate and an end to attempts for an international ban.

In the 191-nation assembly, there were 84 votes in favor of a nonbinding statement, 34 against and 37 abstentions.

Proposed by Honduras, the statement was largely supported by Roman Catholic countries and opposed by countries with active embryonic stem cell research programs. Many Islamic nations abstained.

The UN Declaration on Human Cloning, as it is named, calls for all member states to adopt a ban on human cloning, which it says is “incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life.”

The US, which has long pushed for a complete ban, voted in favor of the statement while traditional ally Britain, where therapeutic cloning is legal and regulated, voted against it.

The statement should have no impact on countries that allow therapeutic cloning, such as Britain and South Korea, as it is not legally binding.

“The foes of therapeutic cloning are trying to portray this as a victory for their ideology,” Bernard Siegel, a Florida attorney who lobbies to defend therapeutic cloning, said in a Reuters report. “But this confusing declaration is an effort to mask their failure last November to impose a treaty on the world banning therapeutic cloning.”

Breakdown of the vote

Of the 191 countries eligible to vote:

In favor

84 countries voted in favor of the declaration against cloning:

Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Burundi, Chile, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Germany, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Madagascar, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Morocco, Nicaragua, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uzbekistan, Zambia.

Against

34 countries voted against the declaration:

Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, China, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People`s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Iceland, India, Jamaica, Japan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, Tonga, United Kingdom.

Abstention

37 countries abstained from voting on the declaration against cloning:

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Colombia, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

Absent

36 countries were absent from and during the vote on the declaration against cloning:

Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Bhutan, Botswana, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Dominica, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nauru, Niger, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Russian Federation, Senegal, Seychelles, Swaziland, Togo, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam.

Sources


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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