Wiki Actu en

March 29, 2009

New Jersey officials: Stimulus bill hurting Atlantic City casinos

New Jersey officials: Stimulus bill hurting Atlantic City casinos

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, March 29, 2009

New Jersey
Other stories from New Jersey
  • 3 May 2015: Stand by me: Music legend Ben E King dies at 76
  • 4 March 2015: Beverly Hall, indicted public school superintendent, dies aged 68
  • 15 September 2014: ‘Miss New York’ Kira Kazantsev wins Miss America 2015 pageant
  • 12 April 2014: Weev iPad hacking conviction overturned
  • 1 October 2013: Sallie Mae leads Consumer Financial Protection Bureau complaints about student loans
…More articles here
Location of New Jersey

A map showing the location of New Jersey

To write, edit, start or view other articles on New Jersey, see the New Jersey Portal

A New Jersey congressman says restrictions on federal stimulus money are hurting gaming destinations like Atlantic City, and he is seeking to repeal a provision banning the use of funds for casinos or other gaming establishments.

HAVE YOUR SAY
Wikinews commentary.svg
Is Ken Calemmo right to suggest that the gaming industry is as important as manufacturing, retail or finance?
Add or view comments

“The demonization of gaming destinations such as Las Vegas and Atlantic City for business travel is wrong, wrong, wrong,” U.S. Rep Frank LoBiondo said Friday during a press conference in front of Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City.

The $787 billion federal stimulus bill passed in February specifically prohibits casinos from applying for funds for infrastructure improvements and other similar projects. LoBiondo said Atlantic City is losing millions of dollars in business as a result of that provision.

Casinos’ revenues dropped 19.2 percent in February 2009 month compared to February 2008, according to the New Jersey Casino Control Commission. LoBiondo said $160 million worth of business and 120,000 visitors have chosen other cities for their tourism plans due to the stimulus bill, according to Atlantic City Convention Center figures.

The administration also recently determined other groups like nonprofit organizations and local governments may not spend their stimulus money at casino properties. State officials said the rules are damaging a major pillar of the New Jersey economy.

“Are those jobs somehow less important or less meaningful than those in the manufacturing, retail or financial industries?” said Ken Calemmo, chairman-elect of the Greater Atlantic City Chamber.

Atlantic City, New Jersey
Image: Bob Jagendorf.

Anti-gambling officials said the stimulus law does not prohibit casinos from taking advantage of tax breaks, and Atlantic City officials should not complain about the stimulus bill because the city is too reliant on an unreliable revenue stream.

“There isn’t a state, including New Jersey or Nevada, that could gamble themselves rich, any more than an individual could gamble themselves rich,” said Tom Grey, field director for StopPredatoryGambling.org. “They should’ve diversified (the economy) instead of chasing their loss.”

But Joe Kelly, chamber president, said 35,000 people work at New Jersey casinos, and thousands more around the state work for outside vendors that depend on casinos for their business.

“It is not just an Atlantic County issue. It is not just a Cape May issue,” Kelly said. “There’s purchasing done by every county.”

LoBiondo is working to repeal the provision with U.S. Rep Shelly Berkley, co-chair of the Congressional Gaming Cascus, and has reached out to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who has a history of representing the interests of the gaming industry.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 25, 2009

New Jersey files lawsuit against federal sports betting ban

New Jersey files lawsuit against federal sports betting ban

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

New Jersey
Other stories from New Jersey
  • 3 May 2015: Stand by me: Music legend Ben E King dies at 76
  • 4 March 2015: Beverly Hall, indicted public school superintendent, dies aged 68
  • 15 September 2014: ‘Miss New York’ Kira Kazantsev wins Miss America 2015 pageant
  • 12 April 2014: Weev iPad hacking conviction overturned
  • 1 October 2013: Sallie Mae leads Consumer Financial Protection Bureau complaints about student loans
…More articles here
Location of New Jersey

A map showing the location of New Jersey

To write, edit, start or view other articles on New Jersey, see the New Jersey Portal

A New Jersey state senator has filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn a federal law banning sports betting in 46 states.

State Sen. Raymond Lesniak, a Democrat representing portions of Union County, filed the suit Monday, arguing the 17-year-old law is unconstitutional because it treats four states differently than the other states.

Under the law, sports betting is prohibited in all states except Delaware, Oregon, Montana and Nevada, although only the latter two currently allow wagering.

“This federal law deprives the State of New Jersey of over $100 million of yearly revenues, as well as depriving our casinos, racetracks and Internet operators of over $500 million in gross income,” Lesniak said in a statement to the press.

The 39-page lawsuit is believed to be the first challenge to the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992. New Jersey missed a 1994 deadline that would have allowed it to join the other states when the law was implemented.

Atlantic City officials and their political allies have argued allowing sports betting would give all the states a new source of revenue needed in the face of a staggering recession.

New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine was not involved with the lawsuit, but he said legalizing sports betting would help Atlantic City and said it was “worth pursuing”.

Legalizing sports betting in New Jersey could bring the state more than $50 million in annual tax revenue, according to officials from the Interactive Media Entertainment & Gaming Inc., a Washington, D.C.-based consultant for the electronic gaming industry, which joined Lesniak as a plaintiff in the lawsuit.

“This is about more than revenue,” said Joe Brennan Jr., chairman of Interactive Media Entertainment. “It’s about jobs and economic activity.” According to 1999 study, $380 billion in illegal sports betting occurs in the state each year.

Atlantic City, New Jersey
Image: Bob Jagendorf.

New Jersey, in particular, is facing a difficult budget season, and the Atlantic City casinos are in what the Associated Press called a “financial meltdown”. Eleven of the city’s casinos suffered their biggest revenue decline in 30 years last month.

Delaware is reported to be considering regulating sports betting, which New Jersey backers of the lawsuit said adds a sense of urgency to the issue.

“We cannot afford to be naive about illegal sports betting,” New Jersey State Sen. Jeff Van Drew said in a statement to the press. “It’s happening right now, and is funding other criminal enterprises which are far more dangerous.”

The New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association, the Thoroughbred Breeders Association of New Jersey and the Standardbred Breeders & Owners Association of New Jersey were also listed as plaintiffs in the lawsuit.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 22, 2009

Bouncer stabbed to death in Atlantic City brawl

Bouncer stabbed to death in Atlantic City brawl

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, March 22, 2009

New Jersey
Other stories from New Jersey
  • 3 May 2015: Stand by me: Music legend Ben E King dies at 76
  • 4 March 2015: Beverly Hall, indicted public school superintendent, dies aged 68
  • 15 September 2014: ‘Miss New York’ Kira Kazantsev wins Miss America 2015 pageant
  • 12 April 2014: Weev iPad hacking conviction overturned
  • 1 October 2013: Sallie Mae leads Consumer Financial Protection Bureau complaints about student loans
…More articles here
Location of New Jersey

A map showing the location of New Jersey

To write, edit, start or view other articles on New Jersey, see the New Jersey Portal

Atlantic City, New Jersey
Image: Bob Jagendorf.

A bouncer at the Irish Pub in Atlantic City, New Jersey was stabbed to death Saturday morning while trying to break up a fight.

Luis Martinez, 25, of Newark, was arrested on two charges of aggravated assault for the brawl that left 27-year-old Richard Rivera dead.

Richard Kutch, another bouncer at the bar on St. James Place, was injured and hospitalized after the fight.

Martinez was committed to Atlantic City Jail in lieu of $250,000 bail, with additional charges pending.

The fight occurred around 4:30 a.m. Authorities believe the two bouncers were trying to break up a fight involving Martinez, but they are still trying to determine what sparked the brawl and have declined to released further details.

Media reports said Rivera was well known and well liked by patrons at the Irish Pub, which has been open since 1972.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 9, 2006

Belated New Jersey budget passes, ending most of the shutdown

Belated New Jersey budget passes, ending most of the shutdown

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, July 9, 2006

New Jersey — At around 7p.m. EDT July 8, Governor of New Jersey Jon Corzine signed a 30-billion USD budget for the fiscal year that began July 1.

Due to strife between the Governor and the majority-holding New Jersey Democratic Party in the New Jersey General Assembly, the budget was not passed before the previous one lapsed. Because of clauses in the New Jersey State Constitution, the government cannot spend money without a full budget being approved beforehand.

As a result of this, Corzine shut down large swaths of state government, kept essential officers working without pay, and declared a statewide state of emergency.

The disagreement between the statehouse and Drumthwacket was over how to deal with the 4.5 billion USD budget deficit: Corzine advocated raising the sales tax from 6% to 7%, the Assemblyers refused for a time. Under the final budget, the increase is implemented. Corzine states that all of the increased revenue will go towards covering the hole, while Assemblers want some of it to offset a planned decrease in the property tax

Following the promulgation of the budget, Corzine then signed another executive order allowing the government to begin resuming normal operations. One of the first results of the budget’s passing was the resumption of gambling in Atlantic City, which requires state monitors. The remainder of closed agencies and departments will come online again in the next two days; all government should be back to normal by July 10.

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
2006 New Jersey State Government Shutdown

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 3, 2006

Parts of New Jersey government stopped as budget fails to clear Legislature in time

Parts of New Jersey government stopped as budget fails to clear Legislature in time

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, July 3, 2006

New Jersey — Numerous non-essential state services have ceased operation indefinitely from July 1. These include road work, the New Jersey Lottery, and the Motor Vehicle Commission, with Atlantic City casinos and racetracks (which require state monitoring) and public beaches and parks closing from July 5.

As a result of Article VIII, Section II, paragraph 2 of the New Jersey State Constitution, the state is required to determine all debts for “as far as can be ascertained or reasonably foreseen” and provide for them in a single budget act. As the 2005-2006 Fiscal Year for the state ended with June 31 and the 2006-2007 budget has not passed the state is blocked from expending any money, also by VIII, II, 2. The current ascertainment shows the state ending up in the red by 4.5 billion USD.

The main cause of the problem is a furious deadlock between the Democratic majority is the New Jersey General Assembly, the lower house of the New Jersey Legislature, which is given the power of starting the budget, and the Democratic Governor of New Jersey Jon Corzine. The main concern is Corzine’s plan to raise taxes, such as the sales tax. The Assembly majority dislikes this and some in the New Jersey Senate, which has the power to block the budget, also disagree with his measure.

Originally the racetracks were to close with the state lottery, however a court order has kept them running past the 4th. The casinos attempted to get a similar exemption, but that was definitively rejected by the New Jersey Supreme Court. “Critical” services like the New Jersey State Police, the state’s prisons, and hospitals will continue to operate without funding. All non-essential employees of the state were given leave from July 1 on.

All 12 casinos in Atlantic City locked their doors for the first time in the 28-year history of legalized gambling in New Jersey. Casino inspectors, who are state employees, are no longer working. While the casino floor is shut down, many casinos have remained open for hotel, restaurant, and entertainment business.

Members of both houses of the Legislature have been kept in the capital, Trenton, to help a speedy passage.

A similar situation occurred in Minnesota exactly one year ago as the Legislature failed to pass the budget before they were forced to adjourn by a hard-wired date in the state constitution.

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
2006 New Jersey State Government Shutdown

Related news

Minnesota state government shuts down” — Wikinews, July 1, 2005

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress