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June 6, 2010

WHO\’s reaction to H1N1 influenced by drug companies, reports claim

WHO’s reaction to H1N1 influenced by drug companies, reports claim

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Sunday, June 6, 2010

Reports suggest the World Health Organisation’s declaring a swine flu pandemic was an error driven by drug companies, and lead to unjustified fear. A year after the swine flu pandemic was declared, stocks are left unused and governments try to abandon contracts, pharmaceutical companies have profited at least £4.6billion from the sale of vaccines alone.

Reports by the British Medical Journal (BMJ), the Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) and the Council of Europe claim that The World Health Organisation reaction to H1N1 was influenced by pharmaceutical companies and that key scientists behind advice had financial ties with firms Roche and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). These conflicts of interest have never been publicly disclosed by WHO, an apparent violation of its own rules.

The World Health Organisation issued H1N1 guidelines in 2004, recommending countries to stockpile millions of doses of antiviral medication. The advice prompted many countries around the world into buying up large stocks of Tamiflu, made by Roche, and Relenza manufactured by GSK.

A joint investigation with the BMJ and the BIJ, found that scientists involved in developing the WHO 2004 guidance had previously been paid by Roche or GSK for lecturing and consultancy work as well as being involved in research for the companies. “The WHO’s credibility has been badly damaged,” BMJ editor Fiona Godlee said in an editorial.

A report by the health committee of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, a 47-member human rights watchdog, found that the WHO’s reaction was influenced by drug companies that make H1N1 antiviral drugs and vaccines. It criticised WHO lack of transparency around the handling of the swine flu pandemic and says the public health guidelines by WHO, EU agencies and national governments led to a “waste of large sums of public money and unjustified scares and fears about the health risks faced by the European public.”

Cquote1.svg We’re still in the pandemic Cquote2.svg

—Margaret Chan of the World Health Organisation said yesterday.

A spokesman for WHO said the drug industry did not influence its decisions on swine flu. Margaret Chan, the organisation’s director, had dismissed inquiries into its handling of the A/H1N1 pandemic as “conspiracy theories” earlier this year, she had said: “WHO anticipated close scrutiny of its decisions, but we did not anticipate that we would be accused, by some European politicians, of having declared a fake pandemic on the advice of experts with ties to the pharmaceutical industry and something personal to gain from increased industry profits.”

Yesterday, a 16-member “emergency committee” consisting of advisors from the World Health Organisation said that the H1N1 pandemic is not yet over. The WHO has refused to identify committee members, arguing that they must be shielded from industry pressure, so possible conflicts of interest with drug companies are unknown. The BMJ report also reveals that at least one expert on the “emergency committee” received payment during 2009 from GSK.

In related news, Reuters reported, Pfizer Inc, the world’s biggest drugmaker, is selling its swine vaccine business to Chinese Harbin Pharmaceutical Group for $50 million.

Related news

  • “WHO: H1N1 influenza virus still a pandemic” — Wikinews, June 4, 2010

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September 17, 2009

Swine flu, in-depth: worldwide report

Swine flu, in-depth: worldwide report – Wikinews, the free news source

Swine flu, in-depth: worldwide report

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Thursday, September 17, 2009

Swine Flu
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People in Mexico City wear masks on a train due to the swine flu outbreak
More information on H1N1:
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The H1N1 outbreak of swine flu, which began in Mexico this April, has now spread across the globe. There have been at least 3,330 deaths from the swine flu since the virus started spreading, out of almost 316,000 total reported cases.

Nine countries — Australia, Brazil, France, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, the UK, and the US — have promised to send ten percent of their antiviral vaccine supply to other countries, should the latter be in need of it. The plan was agreed to “in recognition that diseases know no borders and that the health of the American people is inseparable from the health of people around the world,” a statement by the US government read.

In an in-depth report, Wikinews takes a look at how the disease has affected countries around the world.


Brazil

As of Wednesday, Brazil has registered 899 deaths from the swine flu, making it the hardest-hit country in terms of fatalities. The city of Sao Paulo reported 327 deaths, and Rio de Janerio 84.

However, the country’s health ministry also said that the rate of serious cases “fell for the fifth straight week.”

Brazil had surpassed the United States, which has 593 deaths, in number of total fatalities from the outbreak late in August.

Argentina, Brazil’s neighbour to the south, has 512 deaths from the H1N1 virus.

China

10,000 cases of swine flu were confirmed across China since the outbreak began. The number of infections seems to be increasing quickly.

Communications director for the World Health Organisation Vivian Tan said that “in the last week or so, the increase has been quite quick,” attributing the rise to a small decrease in temperatures as fall sets in, as well as students returning to school after summer breaks.

China’s official news agency Xinhua reported that 1,118 new cases of the influenza were reported in a two-day period earlier in the week, adding that a vast majority of the cases had been transmitted in China, not by persons entering the country from abroad.

All 31 of China’s provinces have reported instances of the flu. The disease initially seemed to be limited to large cities, but recently has started moving into more rural areas.

No casualties from the swine flu have yet been confirmed in China.

France

The office of France’s president Nicolas Sarkozy said that the country would pledge up to one tenth or nine million of its 94 million antiviral vaccine doses to the World Health Organisation, to be distributed to countries with fewer vaccine supplies if needed.

International solidarity “will be a determining factor in reducing the health, economic and social impact of the pandemic,” according to a statement released by the government.

India

On Wednesday, eleven people had been reported dead from the virus in India, taking the country’s death toll up to 212 people. The number of people infected with the influenza is now estimated at 6,800.

██ Confirmed cases followed by death

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██ Unconfirmed or suspected cases

See also: H1N1 live map, WHO updates

██ 5000+ confirmed cases

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See also: H1N1 live map, WHO updates

██ 0 deaths

██ suspected deaths

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See also: H1N1 live map, WHO updates

██ Confirmed community outbreaks

See also: H1N1 live map, WHO updates

India’s health ministry on Tuesday said that the Tamiflu drug would be on sale in the open market within seven days, allowing for a “restricted sale” of the drug.

An unnamed official said that “it is expected that within the next five to seven days, both the drugs would be available in the retail market through identified chemists against proper medical prescriptions.

“Taking into account the current spread of the influenza A(H1N1) in the country, the health ministry has decided that retail sale of Tamiflu and Zanamivir should be allowed in the country but in a regulated manner,” he said.

Previously, distribution of Tamiflu was prohibited by the government, and access to it was only available through public health institutions.

Kenya

At least 70 people in Kenya have the swine flu, according to local health official. In the latest outbreak, twenty high school students came down with the virus and had to be quarantined on Thursday.

“A majority of the affected students who are in Forms One and Two were treated and advised to remain under bed rest to minimise further spread of the disease among the student community,” said the director of Public Health, Dr. Shanaaz Shariff. However, he said that the students’ illness was “not too serious to warrant hospitalisation.”

Security guards were placed around the school the students were isolated in, with orders only to allow medical personnel to enter the premises.

Kenya’s capital Nairobi has been the worst hit by the flu, having reported forty cases. Other cities affected by the flu are Kisumu and Rift Valley, who have reported eighteen and ten cases of the H1N1 virus, respectively.

Mexico

Mexico, the country in which the outbreak initially started, has 25,214 reported cases and 217 fatalities from the virus. Some recent cases have forced schools to close down.

Jose Angel Cordova, the Mexican health secretary, said that the virus could infect as many as five million of Mexico’s 107 million people, and, in a worst-case scenario, cause up to 2,000 deaths. His estimate is higher than his previous prediction of 1 million cases and 1,000 deaths, made last month.

United Kingdom

About five thousand new cases of swine flu were reported in the United Kingdom in recent weeks, reversing a declining trend in the number of new infections. Health officials have suggested this could lead up to a second outbreak of the virus.

“We don’t know whether this is the start of the next big wave that we were expecting this autumn but it is certainly something that’s giving us concern. It will probably be a week or two before we see whether this increase is sustained.” said Liam Donaldson, the Chief Medical Officer.

Health authorities have said that at least 25 cases appear to have been resistant to the Tamiflu drug prescribed to treat the illness.

Donaldson said that “the positive side of it is that so far these have not been strains that have then gone on and affected other patients, they have stayed with the patient in which they were isolated. What would worry us is if we got a resistant strain that then started infecting people like the rest of the cases of flu that have occurred.”

The UK is one of several countries that have pledged up to one tenth of their vaccine stock to to other countries if they are in need of more supplies. “[Britain] recognizes that H1N1 is a global pandemic which requires a global response,” the International Development Secretary, Douglas Alexander, said. “Solidarity with other nations is vital, particularly the poorest who may be most vulnerable and have least capacity to respond.”

United States

The US government recently bought 195 million doses of swine flu vaccine. Health Care Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said that free shots will be given out early in October. The vaccination is to be voluntary, but priority will be given to certain groups, such as toddlers and children, adults over the age of 65, and pregnant women, who are considered especially vulnerable to the virus.

“We remain confident that the United States will have sufficient doses of the vaccine to ensure that every American who wants a vaccine is able to receive one,” a White House statement said.

As of September 16, the US had 593 deaths from the flu.

Vietnam

144 people in Vietnam were diagnosed with the swine flu on Wednesday, bringing the total number of infected people in the country to 5,648. This week, the number of affected people has increased by 1104 infections or 6.3%.

Nguyen Tran Hien, the director of the Central Institute of Hygiene Epidemiology, predicted that the swine flu would peak at the end of 2009 and the beginning 2010.

The Vietnamese Ministry of Health called for more research into a swine flu vaccine, and urged the the National Steering Board on Flu Prevention in Humans to give out more doses of the drug Tamiflu to areas hardest hit by the flu.



Related news

  • “Swine flu: recent developments worldwide” — Wikinews, June 6, 2009
  • “Swine flu worldwide: update” — Wikinews, May 3, 2009
  • “Swine flu outbreaks appear globally; WHO raises pandemic alert level to 5” — Wikinews, April 29, 2009
  • “Swine flu reported in more countries; WHO warns of possible pandemic risk” — Wikinews, April 28, 2009
  • Outbreak of swine flu in Mexico kills at least twenty, infects 1,000” — Wikinews, April 24, 2009

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July 4, 2009

Rupert Grint, Harry Potter\’s \”Ron Weasley\”, recovers from H1N1 swine flu virus

Rupert Grint, Harry Potter’s “Ron Weasley”, recovers from H1N1 swine flu virus

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Saturday, July 4, 2009

Swine Flu
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People in Mexico City wear masks on a train due to the swine flu outbreak
More information on H1N1:
  • 2009 swine flu outbreak
  • Swine Flu
  • H1N1

Rupert Grint, best known for playing Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter films, has now recovered from the H1N1 swine flu virus after missing some days on the set for the latest installment of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.

Rupert Grint best known for playing as Ron Weasley has now recovered from the H1N1 swine flu virus
Image: John Griffiths .

Unrelated to Grint’s illness, the World Health Organisation (WHO) is currently investigating a strain of the flu virus which appears to be resisting the anti-viral drug Tamiflu. An unnamed 16-year-old traveling between San Francisco and Hong Kong was released from hospital after one week following her arrival in Hong Kong. Officials are following up on her contacts to trace the source of contagion.

Danish and Japanese authorities have also identified two other people who have come down with H1N1 flu virus following anti-viral flu treatments.

Currently there are 5,254 reported cases of H1N1 flu across Australia with ten dying from the flu. Officials say “those numbers are increasing, we think they’re increasing much faster than that across New South Wales and indeed across the country”

Canada has had 33 H1N1 flu deaths and close to 7,900 reported cases.

New Zealand officials report close to 950 people who have contracted the H1N1 flu virus and confirmed its first death related to the virus. The Chief Coroner feels the virus may have contributed to the deaths of two others as well. The New Zealand director of public health said the “swine flu will be a mild illness but in some instances the infection can cause more severe illness and, in a few tragic instances, death.”

Bulgaria’s Minister of Health reported two young boys who are under quarantine after falling ill with H1N1 flu virus after traveling to the U.S., and Saudi Arabia respectively. Bulgaria has now had ten H1N1 flu cases.

Altogether over 70,000 persons worldwide have come down with the H1N1 flu, as confirmed through testing, and there have been over 300 registered deaths attributable to the virus.

Margaret Chan, WHO spokesperson said, “As we see today, with well over 100 countries reporting cases, once a fully fit pandemic virus emerges, its further international spread is unstoppable.” This sentiment has been repeated by the United Nations health official.

The UK health secretary, Andy Burnham has forecast over 100,000 H1N1 flu virus cases per day before September 1.



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April 26, 2009

US declares public health emergency over spread of swine flu

US declares public health emergency over spread of swine flu

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Sunday, April 26, 2009

Official image of Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced today at a news conference that the U.S. has declared a public health emergency in light of the swine flu outbreak. The total number of confirmed swine flu cases in the United States stands at 20.

Secretary Napolitano said that the United States’ declaration follows suit with the “standard operating procedure” of such an outbreak to make more government resources available to combat the disease. One direct result of the declaration is the government’s mobilization of approximately 12 million doses of Tamiflu to locations where the states can quickly access their share of the medication if needed.

Secretary Napolitano urged residents not to panic saying that the government is issuing a “declaration of emergency preparedness.” Secretary Napolitano added, “Really that’s what we’re doing right now. We’re preparing in an environment where we really don’t know ultimately what the size of seriousness of this outbreak is going to be.”

John Brennan, a Homeland Security assistant, added that “at this point, a top priority is to ensure that communication is robust and that medical surveillance efforts are fully activated.”

This afternoon, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg reported that 8 students from the St. Francis Prepatory School in Queens, New York have contracted the swine flu. All in all, more than 100 students from that high school were absent last week with flu-like symptoms.

Meanwhile, public health officials in Ohio today announced one confirmed case of swine flu in the state. Thus far, California has reported 7 confirmed cases of swine flu, while Kansas and Texas have each reported two confirmed cases.

At the same news conference Dr. Richard Besser, the acting director from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said to expect additional cases of swine flu to be reported in the short term. Dr. Besser added that the U.S. could also start seeing cases of the disease where the effects are more dramatic: “We’re going to see more severe disease in this country”. So far, no one in the U.S. has died from swine flu.



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February 3, 2008

Drug-resistant flu rising, says WHO

Drug-resistant flu rising, says WHO – Wikinews, the free news source

Drug-resistant flu rising, says WHO

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Sunday, February 3, 2008

Tamiflu-brand tablets of oseltamivir.

Some flu viruses in the United States and Canada have shown increased levels of resistance to the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir), the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Friday. Similar trends have been reported earlier in Europe.

Tamiflu is currently the recommended treatment for humans infected with bird flu, and governments worldwide have been stockpiling the drug in case of a flu pandemic.

The drug resistance appears to be limited to the H1N1 variant which causes seasonal flu, while H3N2 or influenza B strains and the H5N1 strain that causes bird flu did not show increased resistance.

Cquote1.svg The frequency of oseltamivir resistance in H1N1 viruses in the current influenza season is unexpected and the reason why a higher percentage of these viruses are resistant is currently unknown. Cquote2.svg

—World Health Organization

While previous studies showed resistance levels below 1%, samples tested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now showed around 5% resistance, and in a Canadian survey of 81 samples, 8 showed resistance. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control found 19 cases of resistance among 148 samples from last November. Among 16 samples from Norway, 12 showed resistance. In a wider study of 437 H1N1 isolates from 19 countries, the European agency found 59 resistant samples from 9 countries.

Resistance has not been shown to increase in Japan or Hong Kong. In Japan, Tamiflu is widely prescribed for seasonal flu. The WHO is now contacting national authorities to get more data on flu resistance.

These viruses have acquired a mutation that makes them resistant, and the WHO statement said that a resistant strain has probably emerged spontaneously. The statement added that these mutations would most likely render Tamiflu ineffective for the prevention or treatment of flu caused by resistant H1N1 viruses.

The WHO also stated that this phenomenon does not influence the effectiveness of flu immunizations. Resistant strains have shown no evidence of causing more severe disease or being more easily transmissible.



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June 3, 2006

Indonesian human-to-human bird flu infection may be false alarm

Indonesian human-to-human bird flu infection may be false alarm

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Avian Flu
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More information on H5N1:
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  • Transmission and infection of H5N1

Saturday, June 3, 2006

Human-to-human transmission of the H5N1 Avian Flu (Bird Flu) virus was earlier suspected in an Indonesian nurse currently hospitalised who was showing symptoms of the virus. However it is now being reported that tests on the woman for avian virus have been returned showing negative results, and that the samples are being sent to a World Health Organization approved laboratory in Hong Kong for further analysis and confirmation.

“Thank God, the result came back negative,” said senior official for the Indonesian Health Ministry, Hariadi Wibisono.

The nurse had been in close contact with two children, brother and sister, who have died. The sister, nine, was confirmed of having died from the virus by local lab tests. The brother was buried before any blood tests could be taken, but showed similar symptoms.

It was reported on Friday that an analysis has shown that the virus has not mutated, and the WHO has said that there was no evidence so far of human-to-human transmission.

Other members of the same family are currently ill, but all members have received the Tamiflu antiviral drug.

“I think it is a cluster. The local test from the victim in Pamulang is bird flu positive. The symptoms of the virus are very similar to previous clusters we’ve had. The parents are also suffering from flu, and we are giving them a full dose of Tamiflu now,” said Indonesia’s Health Minister, Siti Fadilah Supari.

“The characteristics of germ (the boy had) is very similar (to his sister’s), and now their mother and father are suffering from flu. They are all in the Pamulang district,” added Supari.

The nurse, whose initials are “C.I.,” 25, has been put in isolation at Bandung’s Hasan Sadikin Hospital, but officials say that her condition is stable and that her case may be the result of human-to-human transmission due to the fact that she has not had any contact with poultry.

“We could not confirm whether she is positive of having been infected by avian influenza virus or not, although she had earlier have contacts with siblings, 18-year old Ad and 10-year old Ai, who died of bird flu virus recently,” said Hadi Yusuf, chief of the Bird Flu team at Sadikin Hospital.

“When she arrived at this hospital last night, her body temperature was very high, namely 39.6 Celsius degrees but now it has decreased to 37 Celsius degrees. After considering her contact with dead bird flu victims, we declared her a suspected bird flu case. But she is still fully conscious, her breathing problems are not too serious and she’s not experiencing chest pain,” added Yusuf.

The names of the children and the nurse have not been released. The nurse is undergoing treatment and has been administered Tamiflu. She is expected to be released when the required amount of doses is given, which officials say could be as early as next week.

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May 27, 2006

Tamiflu maker on alert after bird flu deaths in Indonesia

Tamiflu maker on alert after bird flu deaths in Indonesia

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Saturday, May 27, 2006

The World Health Organization (WHO) on Saturday asked the Swiss manufacturer of the antiviral medicine Tamiflu to prepare the global stockpile of the drug for distribution after a family of seven Indonesians died from the H5N1 avian flu virus. However, the WHO says that there is no cause for alarm at this point.

“Whenever there is a cluster, we contact Roche just to let them know that if we need to send the stockpile that they should be ready to do so,” said a spokeswoman for the WHO, Maria Cheng. However, Cheng says “we have not asked that anything be sent, and nothing from Roche has been sent.”

Jules Pieters, director of the WHO’s rapid response unit, informed Roche Holdings AG to be on alert for the next two weeks after the Indonesian health ministry informed the WHO of the deaths of the members of a family cluster in Kubu Simbelang village in North Sumatra. “We were quite keen to inform Roche quite timely, we knew Thursday would be a holiday in Europe and wanted to make sure Roche warehouses would be open,” he said.

Pieters also said that the move was part of standard procedure in cases where there is reasonable suspicion of human-to-human transmission. The WHO flew 9,500 doses of Tamiflu into Indonesia along with protective gear as a precaution.

According to the WHO, the virus has not mutated into an easily human-transmittable form, nor had it spread outside the family, who were all blood relatives in close contact.

Officials in Indonesia also reported on Friday that two more fatal cases of avian flu were reported, this time between an 18-year-old man and his 10-year-old sister. Tests on the two victims are expected to be sent to WHO laboratories for confirmation.

The WHO also says that they have “no intention of shipping that stockpile” and that they consider this “a practice run,” said spokesman for the WHO, Dick Thompson. The WHO also said that the virus has not mutated and so far has not shown any signs of human to human transmission outside the affected family members.

Roche Holding is expected to remain on high alert for at least two weeks.

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May 23, 2006

Human to human transmission of the H5N1 Avian Flu may have infected seven Indonesian family members

Human to human transmission of the H5N1 Avian Flu may have infected seven Indonesian family members

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Tuesday, May 23, 2006

Avian Flu
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Mallard in flight
More information on H5N1:
  • Avian flu
  • H5N1
  • H5N1 genetic structure
  • Transmission and infection of H5N1

The World Health Organization (WHO) said in a statement that all seven Indonesian individuals infected with the deadly H5N1 Avian Flu (Bird Flu) virus, six of whom have died, contracted the disease through “close and prolonged exposure to a patient during a phase of severe illness.” All victims were part of the same family. A 10-year old boy is believed to have contracted the disease through his aunt and then spread the virus to his father. This is the first report of the virus spreading through a three-person chain.

According to the WHO, experts have not been able to find the birds or animals responsible for spreading the disease.

“Although human-to-human transmission cannot be ruled out, the search for a possible alternative source of exposure is continuing,” said the WHO in a statement on its website.

“All confirmed cases in the cluster can be directly linked to close and prolonged exposure to a patient during a phase of severe illness” and that the 32-year old father was “closely involved in caring for his son, and this contact is considered a possible source of infection,” said the WHO in a statement.

However; the WHO also said that that tests performed on samples from the patients, “found no evidence of genetic reassortment with human or pig influenza viruses and no evidence of significant mutations. The viruses showed no mutations associated with resistance to the neuraminidase inhibitors, including oseltamivir (Tamiflu)”

They also stressed that “to date, the investigation has found no evidence of spread within the general community and no evidence that efficient human-to-human transmission has occurred.” In January, DNA taken from two Turkish teens confirmed that they died from a mutated strain of the Bird Flu virus.

Related Wikinews

  • “Turkish teens died of mutated strain of bird flu” — Wikinews, January 13, 2006

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February 18, 2006

First bird flu cases registered In Maharashtra, India

First bird flu cases registered In Maharashtra, India

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Saturday, February 18, 2006

Avian Flu
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Mallard in flight
More information on H5N1:
  • Avian flu
  • H5N1
  • H5N1 genetic structure
  • Transmission and infection of H5N1

The first cases of bird flu have been registered in the world’s second most populous country, India. The cases registered are reportedly from the Nandurbar Slaughter House in the western state of Maharashtra. Some 1500 birds have been reported as having the disease. Maharashtra Animal Husbandary Minister Anees Ahmed confirmed the reports and said that effective steps will be taken with the help of eminent veterinarians. Ahmed also said a high-level meeting was under way in Mumbai to assess the situation and to decide how to cull the large flocks of birds in poultries in Nandurbar and Dhule districts.

The minister also stated that state authorities had decided to cull all 500,000 chickens in the farms in an area of roughly three kilometres around the farms where the infected birds were found.

More than 25,000 chickens had died in poultry farms in the district over the past 10 days, district official Jayant Gaikwad said.

This is the first time that the disease has been reported in India, a nation of 1.1 billion people. There were no reports of infected people and Maharashtra government officials said there was no reason to panic.

The federal cabinet was meeting in New Delhi to take stock of the situation.

India’s animal husbandry and health authorities have a contingency plan in place in case of an avian flu outbreak. The government has said that there are adequate supplies of the generic Tamiflu drug to meet an emergency.

Ahmed said consignments of the drug had been flown to northern Maharashtra, but there have so far been no reports of humans becoming infected.

Doctors have been rushed to the affected areas to take precautionary measures, he added. India’s Animal Disease Laboratory also confirmed the virus in dead chickens.

Maharashtra is the second most populous state in India, having a population of 120 million.

The H5N1 strain of bird flu, which has killed at least 90 people since early 2003, can infect humans in close contact with birds.

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January 13, 2006

Generic Tamiflu in India

Generic Tamiflu in India – Wikinews, the free news source

Generic Tamiflu in India

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Friday, January 13, 2006

Tamiflu (generic name: Oseltamivir) a common antiviral drug used in the treatment and prophylaxis of both Influenza virus A and Influenza virus B, will be marketed in a generic form in India. It is a prodrug, which is hydrolysed hepatically to the active metabolite, the free carboxylate of oseltamivir. It was developed by Gilead Sciences and is currently marketed by Hoffmann-La Roche (Roche) under the trade name Tamiflu.

Cipla received marketing approval from the drug controller-general of India and will launch a generic version of Oseltamivir, Anti-Flu, in the domestic market this month. The drug will be priced at about Rs 1,000 per strip of 10 75 mg tablets, which is less than half the current Tamiflu market price of $60. The required dosage is two tablets every day during five days.

Sources

  • Wikipedia contributors. “Oseltamivir” — Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, January 13, 2006
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