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January 12, 2015

Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo

Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo

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Monday, January 12, 2015

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Marchers in Paris.
Image: Yann Caradec.

Following the shootings at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, millions of people turned out yesterday for marches in Paris, in cities across France, and around the world. Reported estimates of between 1.5 and 2 million people rallied in Paris, and the French interior ministry estimated 3.7 million or more rallied across France.

44 world leaders attended the Paris march including French President François Hollande; German Chancellor Angela Merkel; British Prime Minister David Cameron; Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy; Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi; the President of Mali, Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta; Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu; Mahmoud Abbas, President of the Palestinian Authority; King Abdullah II and Queen Rania of Jordan; Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu; the Russian Foreign Minister, Sergey Lavrov; the Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban; and the President of Gabon, Ali Bongo Ondimba.

US Ambassador to France Jane D. Hartley attended. White House Spokesman Josh Earnest responded to criticism for not sending a higher level representative on behalf of the United States: “It is fair to say we should have sent someone with a higher profile.” Earnest said the rally had been planned on Friday and President Obama attending the rally on such short notice presented “significant security challenges”. Secretary of State John Kerry said he already had a prior engagement in India.

Charlie Hebdo has previously published cartoons featuring the Islamic prophet Muhammed. These include original depictions and reprints of controversial cartoons originally by Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten. Some of these cartoons were on display at the marches.

Marche Charlie Hebdo Paris 07.jpg

Paris: flowers and tributes to the victims of the shooting.
Image: Guerric Poncet.

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Paris march: a protester holding up two colouring pencils, in solidarity with journalists and cartoonists killed in the attack.
Image: Basili.

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Paris march: protestors holding up two giant pencils.
Image: Eric Walter.

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Paris march: more protestors holding up giant pencils.
Image: Eric Walter.

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Paris march: marchers fill the street.
Image: Eric Walter.

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Paris march: more marchers filling the streets.
Image: Yann Caradec.

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Paris march.
Image: Eric Walter.

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Paris march: marchers moving up Boulevard Beaumarchais.
Image: Poulpy.

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Paris march: marchers fill the platform at the Miromesnil Métro station.
Image: Basili.

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Bordeaux rally.
Image: LeJC.

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Rally in Bourg-en-Bresse.
Image: Benoît Prieur.

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Rally in Chambéry.
Image: Florian Pépellin.

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Rally in Lyon.
Image: Jitrixis.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-1.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-11.jpg

A sign at the march in Rennes showing a number of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-7.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Édouard Hue.

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Rally in Rennes.
Image: Pymouss.

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Rally at the Place Royale in Reims.
Image: G.Garitan.

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French flag projected on to the side of the National Gallery in London as a sign of solidarity.
Image: Simeon87.

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Signs, pens, sketch pads and cartoons left as a memorial in Trafalgar Square in London.
Image: Zefrog.

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A pen held up as part of the rally in London’s Trafalgar Square.
Image: Zefrog.

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A man holding both a French and American flag at a rally in Daley Plaza in Chicago.
Image: Stel Cape.

Cologne rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting-191954.jpg

A small rally in Cologne.
Image: Raimond Spekking.

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Candle lights at a rally in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

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Snow-covered flowers and tributes outside the office of the French Ambassador in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

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At the rally in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

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Rally in Stockholm.
Image: Henrik M F.

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Rally in Stockholm.
Image: fcruse.

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A pencil in the snow at the Stockholm rally.
Image: fcruse.

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Rally in Vienna.
Image: Haeferl.

Je suis Charlie, Berlin 11 January 2015 (2).jpg

Rally in Berlin.
Image: Tim.

Je suis Charlie, Brussels 11 January 2015 (122).jpg

Rally in Brussels.
Image: Miguel Discart.



Related news

  • “Twelve dead in shooting at offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo” — Wikinews, January 7, 2015

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January 2, 2010

Somali man attempts failed attack on controversial cartoonist

Somali man attempts failed attack on controversial cartoonist

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Saturday, January 2, 2010

An axe-wielding Somali man attempted to break into the house of controversial cartoonist Kurt Westergaard on Friday night in what the Danish Security Intelligence Service called a “terror-related” attack. According to a statement by the agency, the attacker has “close relations to the Somali terrorist group, al-Shabaab, and al-Qaeda leaders in eastern Africa.” The man, whose name has yet to be released, was shot in the leg and hand after turning the axe on responding police officers. He was hospitalized but Aarhus police say that his condition is not life-threatening.

The cartoonist, 74-year-old Kurt Westergaard, published in 2005 a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad wearing a turban shaped like a bomb with a lit fuse. This, and 11 other cartoons published in Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, sparked the torching of Danish embassies in various Muslim countries.

Westergaard’s five-year-old granddaughter was sleeping over at his house when a man wielding an axe and knife cracked a window, apparently setting off a house alarm. Westergaard, whose life has been threatened multiple times since publication of his cartoon, had prepared a bathroom to function as a safe room. While he and his granddaughter hid there, the attacker reportedly banged on the door, shouting “revenge” and “blood”. Police arrived in less than three minutes. Neither Westergaard nor his granddaughter were injured in the incident.

The attacker is now charged with the attempted murder of Westergaard and a police officer. “My grandchild did fine,” Westergaard told the Jyllands-Posten, “It was scary. It was close. Really close. But we did it.”



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June 4, 2008

Denmark blames al-Qaeda for embassy bombing

Denmark blames al-Qaeda for embassy bombing

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008

On Monday, June 2, the Danish embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan, was attacked with a car bomb. The bomb went off in the parking lot of the embassy at around 12:10 pm (UTC+5), killing at least six and wounding at least 30 others. One Danish citizen was killed.

The controversial page which was in a 2005 edition of Danish newspaper, Jyllands-Posten.

“I think we can say with a reasonable degree of confidence that it was a suicide attack,” said Tariq Pervez, the director-general of the Pakistani Federal Investigation Agency (FIA).

The bomb forced the closure of the Danish embassy, as well as those of Norway and the Netherlands, which were nearby.

Cquote1.svg I urge and incite every Muslim who can harm Denmark to do so in support of the prophet Cquote2.svg

—Ayman al-Zawahiri

While no group has claimed responsibility, the Danish national security intelligence agency PET has concluded that al-Qaeda was behind the attack. “Extremists can be inspired by the attack in Pakistan,” said PET’s director, Jakob Scharf in a statement.

“We are just trying to find any clue, any evidence,” Pakistani investigator Muhammad Mustafa said to the Associated Press. “You know yesterday it was panic here. Usually we miss important things in panic.”

“Samples have been sent to the laboratory to determine what type of explosive was used,” said Mohammad Ashraf Shah, who is in charge of the investigation. Investigators have found that the car with the bomb was a Toyota Corolla, which bore diplomatic license plates.

“One can of course only condemn it, it’s terrible that terrorists commit such acts,” said Per Stig Møller, the Foreign Minister of Denmark, on TV 2 television.

“It was to be expected that they would do something,” said Ikram Sehgal to Reuters, referring to Ayman al-Zawahiri’s recent video encouraging attacks against Denmark over the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy.

“I urge and incite every Muslim who can harm Denmark to do so in support of the prophet, God’s peace and prayers be upon him, and in defense of his honorable stature,” Ayman al-Zawahri said in a video which became public on April 21.

“This attack was not linked to any event in the country or the region, rather it was part of widespread outrage throughout the Islamic world against publishing blasphemous caricatures,” a local official told Daily Times, adding that it would not affect Pakistani negotiations with “local” Taliban, which is considered separate from the Taliban in Afghanistan.



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March 20, 2008

Osama bin Laden warns European Union in new audio tape

Osama bin Laden warns European Union in new audio tape

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Thursday, March 20, 2008

Al-Qaeda
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  • 21 March 2015: Suicide bombers attack mosques in Sanaa, Yemen
  • 7 January 2015: Twelve dead in shooting at offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo
  • 10 December 2014: Senate publish report on CIA torture and misinformation
  • 15 June 2014: Abbott open to possible Australian assistance in Iraq
  • 2 June 2013: Second man charged in Lee Rigby murder case
  • 19 May 2013: White House releases Benghazi emails
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A video released by as-Sahab features an audio track that is reputedly of Osama bin Laden, the al-Qaeda leader, entitled “The Response Will Be What You See, Not What You Hear”.

In it, bin Laden warns that the recent republication of the controversial Muhammad cartoons is more offensive than the killing of women and children and says that a “reckoning for it will be more severe.”

“If there is no check in the freedom of your words, then let your hearts be open to the freedom of our actions,” bin Laden said. In the audio, he sought to reason with the “intelligent ones” in the European Union.

In 2005, the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published a series of cartoons, most of which depicted the Islamic prophet Muhammad. This eventually touched off a series of international protests and boycotts.

In February, tensions flared up again after Danish police arrested three men in an alleged plot to murder cartoonist Kurt Westergaard. Newspapers in Denmark and elsewhere in the EU republished the cartoons in a display of free speech. This was met by protests and boycotts in Muslim nations.



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February 27, 2008

Sudan boycotts Danish goods

Sudan boycotts Danish goods – Wikinews, the free news source

Sudan boycotts Danish goods

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Wednesday, February 27, 2008

Scan of the cartoons as printed on page 3 of the “KulturWeekend” section of Jyllands-Posten’s September 30, 2005, edition.

The country of Sudan has initiated an official boycott of Danish products, after the controversial Muhammad cartoons have been reprinted by a series of newspapers in Denmark and other European countries. Yesterday, President Omar al-Bashir expressed his concerns at a government-backed rally in the nation’s capital, requesting that all Muslims in the world take a stand against Denmark by boycotting “businesses, institutions and individuals,” adding that “no Danes shall ever again be able to set foot in Sudan,” however, no Danish emergency workers in the country have yet been asked to leave.

The crisis, which appeared to have been averted two years ago after a near-omnipresent boycott of Danish goods in the Middle East and other Muslim countries, has re-surfaced after three men were apprehended earlier this month, charged with plotting to murder the cartoonist of what is considered the most offensive caricature, portraying the prophet Muhammad with a turban in the shape of a bomb on his head. Two of the men, both Tunisian citizens, have since been expelled from the country.

Considering dropping financial backing

Several Danish politicians have openly suggested dropping the development aid offered to Sudan. The Danish Minister of Development understands the concerns expressed by party associates and states that she cannot promise not to take action. The strongly-nationalist party, the Danish People’s Party, has stated that any financial support to the country should cease immediately. Other politicians, especially members of the opposition social democratic party believe that removing the financial support to Sudan will only hurt the refugees in the Darfur and other poor regions of the country, rather than the government and people of the capital, Khartoum.

In addition, the Danish Minister of Foreign Affairs, Per Stig Møller, has also stated, that Sudanese government might want to reconsider their methods, if they wish to become members of the World Trade Organization, which the nation has previously stated its interests in. The organisation does not permit consumer boycotts of other countries by its members.

Since the cartoons were published by 17 Danish newspapers earlier this month—along with a number of foreign ones—there have been demonstrations and attacks on Danish embassies and consulates in Pakistan, Jordan and Indonesia.

The Sudanese boycotts and demonstrations throughout the Muslim world have already claimed the first jobs at Arla, the main Danish provider of dairy products, who has seen itself forced to fire 8–10 employees due to lowered demand.


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February 13, 2008

Danish police arrest three in cartoonist murder plot

Danish police arrest three in cartoonist murder plot

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Wednesday, February 13, 2008

Scan of the cartoons as printed on page 3 of the “KulturWeekend” section of Jyllands-Posten’s September 30, 2005, edition.

In the early hours of Tuesday, Denmark’s Politiets Efterretningstjeneste (PET) (Danish Security Intelligence Service), arrested three people for their connection to an alleged plot to murder one of the cartoonists from the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy.

On September 30, 2005, Jyllands-Posten a Danish newspaper, published twelve cartoons depicting the prophet Muhammad. The paper solicited the cartoons for an article that explored “self-censorship” with regards to criticism of Islam. One of the cartoonists that responded was Kurt Westergaard, who contributed an image of Muhammed with a turban that looks like a bomb.

PET says that Westergaard was the target of an alleged plot to murder him. At 4:30 a.m. CET (UTC+1), in a pre-dawn raid, they arrested three men in Aarhus, Denmark. The men, two Tunisians and one Danish citizen of Moroccan origin, are suspected of planning to kill Westergaard.

PET commissioner Jakob Scharf said, “The purpose of the clampdown was to prevent a terror- related homicide. The clampdown occurred after a long period of surveillance.”

The Danish citizen has been released. It is thought that this means that the evidence against him is not very strong. However, the 40-year-old man “will continue to be of interest for the PET” says Scharf.

The two other men, said to be 25 and 36 years of age, and who by all accounts were in Denmark legally, face deportation back to Tunisia. They are due to remain in custody until a judge can review their case on Thursday. “I have no idea about what is going to happen next. The ball is in the court of PET, and they are they ones who need to start talking and explain the meaning of all this. I have no idea what the next step is,” said the public defender assigned to the Tunisians.

The government and the PET has yet to present their case in court. As a result, it is unknown what evidence there is of a plot. Also, it is unknown if the men were under orders from groups outside of Denmark, as has been speculated by media.

However, Scharf says that the pre-emptive police action “was to prevent a planned killing of one of the cartoonists behind the Muhammed-drawings.” The primary objective was not to jail or deport anyone, but to prevent a murder.

The Prime Minister of Denmark, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, commented: “Unfortunately, this case shows, that in Denmark, too, there are groups of extremists, who do not recognize and respect the founding principles upon which the Danish people’s government is built.”

Meanwhile, the editors-in-chief at the three biggest newspapers in Denmark have seen the alleged plot as a threat to their freedom of speech. These papers are Jyllands-Posten, Politiken og Berlingske Tidende. To reassert their rights they all plan to republish the controversial Muhammad drawings on Wednesday.

“We must in Danish media send a clear and unambiguous message to all, that might get the same insane thoughts, as those who would attack Kurt Westergaard,” says Berlingske Tidende chief-editor Lisbeth Knudsen.

Westergaard, who is 73 years old, has been under police protection since he received death-threats shortly after the original publication of the cartoons. “I fear for my life, when the police tell me there are certain people who are working with concrete plans to kill me,” he says.



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  • New agitations over cartoons of Prophet Mohammed” — Wikinews, October 11, 2006
  • “Hamshahri newspaper plans cartoon response” — Wikinews, February 7, 2006
  • “New Zealand newspapers publish “Mohammad Cartoons”” — Wikinews, February 4, 2006
  • “Manipulation alleged in the “Mohammad Cartoons” affair” — Wikinews, February 4, 2006
  • “Tensions continue to rise in Middle East over “Mohammad Cartoons”” — Wikinews, February 3, 2006
  • “Fatah assaults European Union office” — Wikinews, January 30, 2006

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August 18, 2006

Muhammad cartoon row continues

Muhammad cartoon row continues – Wikinews, the free news source

Muhammad cartoon row continues

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Friday, August 18, 2006

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Nearing the one year anniversary of the publication of twelve controversial editorial cartoons depicting Muhammad in a Danish newspaper, a leading authority of Sunni Islam has demanded that the newspaper be shut down.

In an interview with the Danish newspaper Berlingske Tidende, Sheikh Mohammed Sayyed Tantawi, Grand Iman of the Al-Azhar University in Cairo and formerly Grand Mufti of the Republic, demanded the closure of Jyllands Posten, the paper responsible for publishing the cartoons. He went on to call for chief editor Carsten Juste to be jailed for three years, and for the editor of the paper’s cartoon section, Flemming Rose, be depicted as a pig.

“It is thought provoking,” Rose said, “that he (Tantawi) believes it would be a punishment for me to be depicted as a pig. It confirms that the imam has a shocking lack of knowledge about our civilisation, and it confirms the need for dialogue.” Rose added that it shows how blasphemy law in the Arab world is used to suppress those with views different from those in power.

Tantawi called the drawings “one of the most serious crimes ever committed.”

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May 2, 2006

Blogspot ban lifted in Pakistan

Blogspot ban lifted in Pakistan – Wikinews, the free news source

Blogspot ban lifted in Pakistan

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Saturday, May 6, 2006

As of 6th May, 2006, the Pakistani government has once again put a ban on Blogspot. This has been confirmed by numerous bloggers across Pakistan.

The banned blogs can now be accessed through an alternative sites such as PKBlogs.com – Blogspot Proxy and other proxy servers.Tuesday, May 2, 2006

Since the morning of May 2, 2006, the blanket ban on the blogspot.com blogs has been lifted. This has been confirmed by various people on the ‘Action Group Against Blogspot Ban In Pakistan’ mailing list. The six baloch and plenty of Indian sites are still blocked.

The website was originally blocked because some of the blogs it hosted, reportedly contained “sacrilegious” content, mostly in the form of cartoons that were earlier published by Jyllands-Posten, and republished in some Blogs. The Supreme Court of Pakistan directed the government of Pakistan to block all websites that contained such content on March 1, 2006.

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March 8, 2006

Buffalo, NY magazine to publish Prophet Muhammad cartoons

Buffalo, NY magazine to publish Prophet Muhammad cartoons

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Wednesday, March 8, 2006

The magazine Free Inquiry, issued in Buffalo, New York and published by the Center for Inquiry, is to publish some of the Islam’s Prophet Muhammad cartoons. These cartoons were originally published in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, causing waves of violence and protests among Muslims worldwide.

Tom Flynn, editor of the secular magazine, said that he was only acting alongside several European papers that reprinted the cartoons “demonstrating a commitment to free expression and a free press.” He commented further that “no religious teaching, community, or institution should be held immune from criticism simply because of its religious nature.”

Three articles will be published alongside the cartoons. In the first, Flynn will trace the controversy and explain the magazine’s decision to publish them. A second, by R. Joseph Hoffmann, director of the Council for Secular Humanism’s Committee for the Scientific Examination of Religion, will present further commentary; the last will be on the history of the Prophet Muhammad.

Four of the original twelve cartoons are to be published: the image of Muhammad wearing a bomb with its fuse lit as a turban, another claimed to show horns coming out of the Prophet’s turban, Muhammad [or an Imam] greeting suicide bombers in heaven, and one showing a male face on a Muslim with Islam’s star and crescent. Flynn said this last cartoon “is included as an example of how the collection’s less sharply focused entries fell flat.”

Arif Desai, Imam of the Islamic Society of Niagara Frontier in Amherst, New York, said that the Muslim community felt sorrow over the magazine’s decision to publish the cartoons.

“We feel sorrow, we feel hurt and insulted as these are very disturbing, insulting cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. Obviously, we know and believe in freedom of speech, but along with freedom of speech comes responsibility,” said Desai.

The cartoons will be published next week on March 15, 2006.

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February 19, 2006

Eleven die in Libya over Muhammad cartoon T-shirt

Eleven die in Libya over Muhammad cartoon T-shirt

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Sunday, February 19, 2006

At least 11 people died in Benghazi, Libya on Friday when about 1,000 protesters surrounded and set fire to an Italian consulate and burned Danish flags. The demonstration was in protest of Italian Reforms Minister Roberto Calderoli, who had worn a T-shirt displaying the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons.

A Libyan government statement said, “eleven casualties, including dead, resulted from the clashes.” some of the casualties were police officers.

After wearing the T-shirt, Calderoli offered to resign.

On Saturday, Libya suspended its Interior Minister, Nasr al-Mabrouk. Libya said that “excessive use of force” was used in the riots the day before. The government also said that “all those involved in Friday’s riots and the officials responsible for them” should be investigated and referred to the courts. “We condemn the excessive use of force and the inappropriate way that went beyond the limits of carrying out the duties of the police.”

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