Wiki Actu en

March 5, 2013

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez dies aged 58

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez dies aged 58

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Hugo Chávez, President of Venezuela between 1999 and 2013.
Image: Marcello Casal Jr./Agencia Brasil.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez died this afternoon at 16:25 local time, Minister Nicolás Maduro said. “Chávez left us as heritage a free and independent country. We’ve got to grow out of this pain. Discipline and brothership”((es)), he said on television national chain.

Chávez had not been seen in public since December, and in February he was brought from Cuba to Venezuela, to be admitted at the Hospital Militar in Caracas. Information Minister Ernesto Villegas recently said Chávez was suffering from a new infection that was affecting his breathing, and was undergoing “intensive chemotherapy.”

Hugo Chávez announced he had cancer in June 2011. He was re-elected president of Venezuela in October 2012 for another term of six years; his swearing-in, however, was delayed because of his illness.

“Don’t let there be violence nor hate, but love, peace, unity and discipline. Unity, fight, and victory, with the people’s unity and the FANB((es)), Maduro said after announcing Chávez’s death.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 19, 2013

Hugo Chávez returns to Venezuela from fourth surgery

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

File photo of Hugo Chávez
Image: Valter Campanato.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez posted yesterday on his Twitter account that he has returned from Cuba to Venezuela after his fourth surgery and treatment against cancer in Havana.

Chávez posted, “We’ve arrived once again in our Venezuelan homeland. Thank you, my God!! Thank you, beloved nation!! We will continue our treatment here.”((es)) Since November 1, Chávez (58) has the most popular Twitter account with 4 million followers.

Chávez was recovering at Havana since December 9, 2012. According to assertions made by vice-president Nicolás Maduro, Chávez arrived in Caracas yesterday at 700 UTC and was admitted to the Militar Hospital of Venezuela. Maduro also said that his family is with him during his recovery, along with some cabinet members. “We shall continue to inform our people about the health and the struggle of President [Chavez]”((es)), he said.

However, some are suspicious his return, specially because there were no television images or photograps of him arriving to Venezuela. The journalist Francisco Toro wrote on the ‘Caracas Chronicles’ website: “So Chávez snuck back into the country at 2:30 in the morning with no previous announcement, no cameras around and only a 3 a.m. tweet to announce the whole thing so … nothing at all strange about that, right!?” Vladimir Villegas, a former Venezuelan ambassador, said: “The only thing that has changed is the location of his seclusion. The uncertainty is the same. Nothing is certain.”



Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 18, 2013

Venezuela opens granite processing facility in Bolívar

Venezuela opens granite processing facility in Bolívar

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

File photo of government-built houses in La Guaira, Venezuela.
Image: Wilfredor.

Monday, February 18, 2013

Venezuela’s government has opened a granite processing plant in the state of Bolívar, with the intention of providing about 25% of the granite required nationwide.

Ricardo Menéndez, vice president of the Productive Economic Area, said Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez has yearned for the creation of this project to empower Venezuelan construction. Granito Bolívar is reportedly the most modern Venezuelan granite plant, not consuming community water or electricity, and is also the largest, with a daily capacity to supply enough material for use in construction of about 820 houses.

Menéndez said, “These granite blocks are the natural resources of our country, are the wealth we have as a country and often [some] simply decided to remove this richness from our country and take them to other countries”((es)).

According to Menéndez, with the help of a state plan, Venezuela intends to exploit its 40,000 million cubic meters or more of granite reserves, generating a set of factories. “[T]he central theme is that these plants, all these factories, are for the construction of socialism; that means using our potential, develop the value chain within the country and of course that yields benefits from the point of view of the production system’s organization…. [Granito] Bolívar is not only the vision that historically we had of exposing richness, but the industries, basic industries we have, that level of our workers in the basic industries and in addition the development of the potential we have in the state”((es)).

For the construction of the plant, supplied by 23 quarries, the government of Bolívar provided about 30 million bolívares (US$4.7 million) and the national government 2.3 million (US$3 million). Bolívar reportedly has reserves of about 40,000 million tons of red, black, pink and white granite, sufficient for domestic demand for 200 years.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 30, 2012

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez returns to Cuba for medical treatment

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, November 30, 2012

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez arrived to Cuba early Wednesday morning to seek hyperbaric oxygenation therapy, a treatment typically given to help cancer patients repair bone and tissue damage caused by radiation, among other illnesses. His announcement has once again caused public speculation regarding his health, as the president declared himself free of pelvic cancer nearly five months ago.

In an interview with state television that same day, Information Minister Ernesto Villegas said that the president will be back no later than January 10th, the inauguration date for his fourth presidential term.

According to Villegas, Chávez is undergoing “complementary treatment.”

“The people voted for Chávez, as is.” Villegas said. “As we all know, coming out [of radiation therapy] is a difficult process for any human being. Yet he did not listen to those who told him not to get involved in the campaign. He campaigned with an effort exemplary of the extraordinary leader that he is.” He added that “Chávez is a human being. He gets sick.”

Under Venezuelan law, the president must request permission from the National Assembly when leaving the country for longer than five days. In a note read by National Assembly President Diosdado Cabello less than 24 hours before the president’s departure, Chávez explained that his doctors in Cuba recommended that he begin the treatment along with physiotherapy to help strengthen his recovery.

Despite having announced that he is “totally free” of cancer, opposition politicians and lawmakers have continued to question the president’s health, citing the administration’s “lack of transparency” during his medical operations as well as a sharp decline in public appearances. Prominent Chávez critic and journalist Teodoro Petkoff recently nicknamed the president “the invisible man.” Meanwhile, opposition assembly member Alfonso Marquina accused Chávez of “attempting to create uncertainty” after Tuesday’s announcement.

Eric Farnsworth, vice president of the Council of the Americas, told Bloomberg News that Chávez’s sudden departure is an indication that his medical condition is more serious than stated. “You’d anticipate that if he were really doing well he’d want to show that publicly.”

Citing an anonymous sources, Spanish newspaper ABC reported Thursday that Chávez’s pelvic cancer has returned and that he is also suffering from bone metastasis. According to the report, intelligence sources believe Chávez left for Cuba because his cancer returned, as hyperbaric oxygen chambers are available in Venezuela.

However, Vice President Nicolas Maduro told a group of government workers Thursday that the president “is fine, doing very well, and will return even better than before.”

Henrique Capriles Radonski, the main opposition candidate in last month’s presidential elections and Chávez’s biggest political opponent, urged the administration to “speak with absolute transparency to avoid rumors that create anxiety and uncertainty. That is the last thing we want to have in Venezuela.”

His treatment in Cuba comes at an inopportune time for his ruling coalition. Nation-wide gubernatorial elections are scheduled for December 16th, and the opposition, led by Capriles, is looking to strengthen its political base after their candidate’s near 11-point defeat in the October 7th elections.



Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 9, 2012

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez re-elected

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez re-elected

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Re-elected President Hugo Chávez.
Image: José Cruz/ABr.

Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

The incumbent president of Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, has been re-elected for a fourth term as the country’s president with a 54.66% share of the vote in the presidential election held Sunday.

Chávez gave these remarks from the presidential palace: “Truthfully, this has been the perfect battle, a democratic battle. Venezuela will continue its march toward the democratic socialism of the 21st century.”

Chávez’s main competitor in the election, Henrique Capriles Radonski, from the Primero Justicia (Justice First) party, got 44.73% of the vote. Radonski promised a shift towards more of a business-friendly stance: “Those who want progress, jobs, well-managed companies, somewhere we can develop small and medium businesses…everyone who wants that kind of country, come and join my bus for progress”.

Turnout for the election was 81%.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 25, 2010

Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez cuts relations with Colombia

Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez cuts relations with Colombia

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

Sunday, July 25, 2010

President Hugo Chávez has temporarily suspended relations with the neighboring country of Colombia.

“I feel obliged for dignity’s sake to suspend relations with the government of Colombia. It is the least we can do, and we will remain alert, as [President Álvaro] Uribe is a sick man, filled with hate,” said Chávez during a ceremony at the Presidential Palace with the coach of the Argentinian national football team, Diego Maradona, whom he was meeting during Maradona’s visit to Venezuela.

The Venezuelan government has given Colombian diplomats 72 hours to leave the country.

“We have sent a message to the Colombian trade delegation in Caracas telling them to close their embassy and vacate the country,” Venezuela’s Foreign Minister, Nicolás Maduro, informed the media.

In an extraordinary session at the headquarters of the Organisation of American States (OAS) in Washington, DC, the Colombian ambassador, Luis Alfonso Hoyos, declared that Chávez’s government was “harbouring FARC guerrillas” on Venezuelan territory and requested the formation of an international committee of inquiry to verify FARC’s presence in Venezuela within 30 days.

Venezuela’s representative to the OAS, Roy Chaderton, advised the assembly to pay no attention to the Colombian “forgeries” and declared that there were thousands of Colombians living in Venezuela and that they were being treated with respect and equality.

“I warn the international community. We will brook no aggression, nor any violations of our national sovereignty,” said Chávez, and added that any war with Colombia would “have to be fought with tears, but it would have to be fought.”

For its part, the United States criticised Venezuela’s decision to cut diplomatic ties.

“I don’t believe that cutting relations is the right way to go [to resolve this problem],” said Philip Crowley, spokesperson for the US State Department.

The Secretary General of the OAS, José Miguel Insulza, also asked both sides to “calm their passions.”

“We have been able to resolve serious conflicts for many years. I hope that we will be able to do so again now, but both Venezuela and Colombia will have to concede ground,” said Insulza.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Venezuelan army on high alert after Chávez cuts diplomatic ties with Colombia

Venezuelan army on high alert after Chávez cuts diplomatic ties with Colombia

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

Sunday, July 25, 2010

Venezuelan troops in a parade
Image: Deffender93.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez has declared that the National Army is on maximum alert along the Colombian border, after he broke relations with that country on Thursday. The declaration comes in the wake of the Colombian Secretary of State’s claim before the Organisation of American States (OAS) that the FARC has a “consolidated,” “active” and “growing” presence in Venezuela, with some 1500 guerrilla fighters in 87 camps.

Venezuela’s Secretary of Defense Carlos Mata told the media that his forces have been mobilised since Thursday morning, and are awaiting the orders of their Commander in Chief, the President.

Chávez announced the breaking of diplomatic ties on behalf of the Venezuelan government after Colombia released documents allegedly showing the active presence of FARC on Venezuelan territory at the Washington headquarters of the OAS, demanding a special inquiry to investigate the matter. Relations between the two countries had previously been strained, after the Venezuelan government voiced its opposition to new US military bases being set up in Colombia.

The Colombian ambassador has been given 72 hours to vacate his offices in Caracas.



Related news

  • “Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez cuts relations with Colombia” — Wikinews, July 25, 2010

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 23, 2009

Carter: US \”likely behind\” Venezuela coup

Carter: US “likely behind” Venezuela coup

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

United States
Related articles
Location of United States
USA orthographic.svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

File photo of former U.S. President Jimmy Carter

Former U.S. president Jimmy Carter told Venezuelan newspaper El Tiempo that the United States was “likely behind” the failed 2002 coup that briefly unseated democratically elected president Hugo Chávez.

A coup by a civilian-military junta in 2002 removed president Chávez from office, but he quickly regained the position.

“I think there is no doubt that in 2002, the United States had at the very least full knowledge about the coup, and could even have been directly involved,” Carter told El Tiempo on Sunday. The Bush administration denied any involvement in the coup. Carter went on to say that it was understandable that Chávez still blames the U.S. for the coup.

Carter also stated his mixed feelings about Chávez, praising him for his social reforms but denouncing him for being uncooperative in making peace with the U.S.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 29, 2009

Colombia’s relations with Venezuela deteriorate over Swedish rockets

Wednesday, July 29, 2009

Related news
on Wikinews
Collaborate!

The President of Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, announced on Tuesday that “We will freeze relations with Colombia.” He attributed the decision to “new aggression by the government of Colombia.” Further, he said, “I’ve ordered to withdraw our ambassador from Bogota, to withdraw our diplomatic personnel.”

This diplomatic move follows claims by Colombia that amongst weapons its military has captured from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) are AT4 anti-tank rockets manufactured by Saab Bofors Dynamics of Sweden. Colombia further alleges that the weapons were first sold to Venezuela before being given to the FARC.

AT4 being fired by U.S. Marines during a training mission.

“This is not the first time that this happens,” Colombian Vice-President Francisco Santos said. “In several operations in which we have recovered weapons from the FARC, we have found powerful munitions and powerful equipment, including anti-tank weapons, from a European country that sold them to Venezuela and that turned up in the hands of the FARC.”

“It is correct that they have found these weapons to be Swedish-made,” said Jens Eriksson, adviser at the Swedish foreign ministry. “We are working together with Colombian authorities to investigate the matter further and we have contacted Venezuelan authorities to clear up how these arms ended up in Colombia.”

Venezuela denies the allegations. “To me it seems that this is a new attack against our government based on lies,” Venezuelan interior minister Tarek El Aissami said on Monday. “We absolutely deny that our government or our institutions are providing assistance to criminal and terrorist organizations. It’s laughable, it sounds like a cheap film made by the American government.”

Foreign minister Nicolás Maduro said that the whole thing is a campaign “to justify the presence of US bases” in Colombia.


Sources


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 18, 2009

Venezuelan referendum ends presidential term limits

Venezuelan referendum ends presidential term limits

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Venezuela
Other stories from Venezuela
…More articles here
Location of Venezuela

A map showing the location of Venezuela

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Venezuela, see the Venezuela Portal
Flag of Venezuela.svg

A referendum held Sunday in Venezuela, has resulted in a change to the Constitution of Venezuela. The change ends term limits for elected officials including the President of Venezuela.

The official results showed 6,319,636 in favor with 5,198,006 opposed, yielding a 54.8% to 45.1% balance. 30.1% of the approximately 17 million voters abstained.

Hugo Chávez in 2008
Image: Agência Brasil.

President Hugo Chávez will now be allowed to run for re-election in 2012. A similar referendum in 2007 was narrowly defeated.

“The doors of the future are wide open,” President Chávez declared from the balcony of the Miraflores Palace after the results were announced. “In 2012 there will be presidential elections, and unless God decides otherwise, unless the people decide otherwise, this soldier is already a candidate.”

Ahead of the vote, opposition leader, Leopoldo López, told BBC News: “In 10 years we have had 15 elections, 15, and this has been the most unequal, the most abusive campaign of all. So that’s why you are seeing more propaganda, more campaigning, more advertisement for the ‘yes’ vote.”

However, a United States Department of State spokesperson said that the election was a “fully democratic” process despite troubling reports of intimidation of the opposition.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress