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June 24, 2012

Swedish House Mafia to separate

Swedish House Mafia to separate – Wikinews, the free news source

Swedish House Mafia to separate

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Sunday, June 24, 2012

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Cquote1.svg We came, we raved, we loved. Cquote2.svg

Swedish House Mafia

Swedish-based house music group Swedish House Mafia have announced their intention to disband after their next tour. A statement from the group said “the tour we are about to go on will be our last”.

The group, which consists of DJs Axwell, Steve Angello and Sebastian Ingrosso, formed in 2008, with its members initially DJing in a pizza shop in the Swedish capital in the early 2000s. In a statement on their website, the group expressed their appreciation to their supporters. “We want to thank every single one of you that came with us on this journey,” the group statement reads. “We came, we raved, we loved.”

Swedish House Mafia appeared at Radio 1’s Hackney Weekend at the weekend. The group also announced future tour dates, including Ushuaia on the Spanish island of Ibiza from July 4 to August 29, the Friends Arena in Sweden on November 24 and the National Bowl in the British town of Milton Keynes on July 14, the latter of which the page says will be the group’s final night in the United Kingdom. “The final leg of this journey will be announced in August,” the statement reads.

Last week, Ingrosso told Rolling Stone magazine of his interest in having Beatles member Paul McCartney collaborate with Swedish House Mafia, describing The Beatles’ music as “kind of melancholic to sad and happy combined”, calling it “just amazing”. Ingrosso believed “what the Beatles have done is what we do today. [It] doesn’t matter that we do dance music”. Below is an image gallery of the members of Swedish House Mafia:

Swedish House Mafia members in December 2011. Image: Matthew Karsten.

Swedish House Mafia members in December 2011.
Image: Matthew Karsten.

Axwell performing in Australia in January 2007. Image: Scootie.

Axwell performing in Australia in January 2007.
Image: Scootie.

Steve Angello performing in the United States in March 2009. Image: Vincent & Bella Productions.

Steve Angello performing in the United States in March 2009.
Image: Vincent & Bella Productions.

File:Sebastian Ingrosso performing in Germany in February 2010. Image: Axe45.

File:Sebastian Ingrosso performing in Germany in February 2010.
Image: Axe45.

Swedish House Mafia performing in the Spanish island of Ibiza in June 2011. Image: Kevin Dougans.

Swedish House Mafia performing in the Spanish island of Ibiza in June 2011.
Image: Kevin Dougans.



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March 18, 2011

British electronica band Faithless to separate

British electronica band Faithless to separate

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Friday, March 18, 2011

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Faithless, an electronica band from the United Kingdom, have made the announcement that they are to separate at the end of their current tour. Their current tour is expected to conclude at the O2 Academy, Brixton on April 8, 2011.

Cquote1.svg After 15 years and six albums I think we’ve probably made our collective point by now and that it’s time to close the book and return to the library. Cquote2.svg

Maxi Jazz

In a statement, Maxi Jazz, a singer from the group said that “[a]fter 15 years and six albums I think we’ve probably made our collective point by now and that it’s time to close the book and return to the library.” The rapper commented explained that “[w]e’ve had, with our fans, the most unbelievable, epic and moving experience, stretching over years and tens of thousands of miles. Joyful, exhilarating and empowering, we never for a moment thought an affair could last this long.”

The group launched fifteen years ago. It consisted of three members, known as Maxi Jazz, Sister Bliss and Rollo Armstrong. Insomnia, God Is a DJ and We Come 1 are amongst the most famous muscial works that have been released from Faithless.



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December 7, 2007

Karlheinz Stockhausen, composer, dies aged 79

Karlheinz Stockhausen, composer, dies aged 79

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Friday, December 7, 2007

Kalheinz Stockhausen, 2005
Image: Edvvc.

The German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen, a pioneer of electronic music among major contemporary musicians, died on December 5. The German foundation, named in his honor, announced today, Stockhausen passed away in his Kürten home in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

A prolific composer, he wrote more than 300 works during his career, establishing himself as a pioneer of electronic music, as well as a representative of serialism. Studie I, dated 1953, is considered one of the first electronic music works ever produced.

Born in Mödrath, Germany, in 1927, he was the son of a mother from a wealthy family and a father who was a teacher. He grew up in Altenberg, where he started taking piano lessons. He studied piano and music pedagogy at the Musikhochschule in Cologne. It was at University of Cologne, he later studied musicology, philosophy and Germanics.

He was influenced by musicians such as Oliver Messiaen, Edgard Varèse, and Anton Webern, but also by painters such as Piet Mondrian and Paul Klee. Stockhausen’s works often departed from usual music styles.

During his life as a musician, Stockhausen explored most of the genres and styles. Starting in punctualism and concrete music early in his career, during the 1950s, he proceeded to research the electronic music area, which at the time was in an embryonic state. In the 1960s, he composed works of choral music, putting side-by-side the chorus and the use of electronic facilities. In the 1970s, he dedicated himself to serialism. Between 1977 and 2003, he committed himself to one of his most ambitious projects: a cycle of thematic works named Licht: Die sieben Tage der Woche (Light: the Seven Days of the Week).

Various artists have stated that they were influenced by Stokhausen, including artists as varied as Frank Zappa, Björk, Miles Davis, as well as Roger Waters and Rick Wright—two of the Pink Floyd members. The Beatles included a portrait of Stockhausen among the people pictured on the cover of their album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Italian singer/songwriter Franco Battiato dedicated Sulle corde di Aries to the composer.

While being a controversial artist, Stockhausen became a focus of polemics after he stated that the September 11, 2001 attacks were “works of art”. He later explained the meaning of his statements, and said that they had been, according to him, out-of-context and misquoted.



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November 6, 2007

Caribou plays the Bowery Ballroom

Caribou plays the Bowery Ballroom – Wikinews, the free news source

Caribou plays the Bowery Ballroom

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Tuesday, November 6, 2007

Daniel Snaith.
Image: David Shankbone.

Daniel Snaith, better known as Caribou, formerly known as Manitoba until a lawsuit by musician Richard “Handsome Dick” Manitoba, recently played New York City’s Bowery Ballroom. Below is Wikinews reporter David Shankbone’s conversation with the electronica pioneer.


David Shankbone: How is the tour going?

Caribou: It’s been really good so far. We started with a few festivals in Europe and then did a month around the UK, Germany and France. Over here we just did Canada and this is the start of a big tour for us around the States. Then Europe for another month. It’s pretty full on, but I love playing shows.

DS: How do European and American audiences compare to each other?

Caribou: I get asked that all the time and I feel people are expecting some kind of an answer like we are better received in Europe, and I don’t know if people expect that of an electronic musician.

DS: But they are more electronic in Europe than they are here, right?

Caribou: Maybe, but my experience is that people are more similar than different in all the shows, and the reaction is more similar than different.

DS: You reach the same fans in each place?

Caribou: Yeah people are so connected to the interests that they share with other people around the world. It’s not like one place is completely different from another anymore.

DS: Do you play to larger audiences over there or here?

Caribou: It’s about the same, again. When we play in London we play about same size venue and size crowd as we do here.

DS: Do you have a favorite venue?

Caribou: A few, actually. Bowery Ballroom is one of my favorites. It’s always awesome. The sound is so good here, which is really important. It sounds good on stage, which is important for getting into the show. We always have really amazing crowds in this place called Richards on Richards in Vancouver. This venue in Slovenia we played that is this old commune squat that has lots of gigs and art going over there called the Metalkova. The best ones are the surprises we’ll play in a tiny little town in some venue that is like whatever.

DS: What would be a dream venue to play?

Caribou: Something along the lines of this place we played in the south of France that was this 1920s arts patron villa where Cocteau and all these people lived and worked, and we played just outside there overlooking the French Riviera during this tiny little festival, so those ones are always fun when you just end up at some idyllic spot where they have put together a little festival with great bands. Those tend to be in Europe, to be honest. The surprise is part of the enjoyment when you arrive and it’s like, this is an insane place to play.

DS: Is there a continent you haven’t played where you would like to?

Caribou: We have never been to South America. Brazil.

DS: Rio or São Paulo?

Caribou: I can’t remember, I think people—I’d love to go to Rio, but friends who have played in Brazil have said that shows are amazing everywhere.

DS: How has the Iraq War affected you as an artist?

Caribou: Not too much, directly, to be honest. The process of recording music, for me, is very insular. I’m just recording at home and it’s very much headspace music. I’m escaping and I’m not a social commentarian or anything. It’s more about escaping into this world of sound in my head. I don’t think it’s affected the business of us touring or anything at all.

DS: Has it affected you as a person?

Caribou: I’m an opponent of the war and I live in the UK where I live under a government that has taken troops to the war or whatever. It hasn’t changed my perspective that much where I feel there have been lots of terrible situations like this in the past and you just have to do whatever is in your power. I was at the big march in London. Use your vote and protest in whatever ways you can, but I haven’t dropped everything in my life and drastically changed my life.

DS: Do you find you’re more inspired by manmade things or things in nature?

Caribou: I think manmade things, but specifically ideas. I’m not interested in things in the real world as much as I am interested in mental ideas and mental contexts. That’s why I did a PhD in Pure Maths, this elegance of pure ideas and things that are somewhat intangible and about ideas. Music is very much like that, playing around with ideas and creating this aesthetic of sound.

DS: What sort of ideas inspire you?

Caribou: In mathematics at the PhD level when I was studying was about constructing these elaborate systems and concepts, playing around with them, and fitting them together. More than ideas is playing around with the ideas, constructing them, and creating something out of them. For example, in music I will have an idea to put some different sounds together or a melody that meshes with a chord sequence or a sonic mood, or whatever. I’m not the type of person who takes physical things apart and plays around with them, but I like taking mental ideas apart and playing around with them. That’s what appeals to me about what I’ve spent my life doing.

DS: Would you consider your music to be mathematical?

Caribou: No, not at all. It’s completely aesthetic almost. It’s about tinkering around with ideas in my head and seeing what kind of sound that actually produces.

DS: Do you have a favorite mathematician or unsolved mathematical problem?

Caribou: I’m not that kind of person. I liked doing mathematics and learning about it, but I was never into mathematical history beyond what I was working on.

DS: What’s a trait you deplore in other people?

Caribou: Apathy or laziness. I’m the kind of person who is always doing something and get excited about something, and I find it frustrating when people get good ideas that are interesting and don’t make the most of that. Anything I want to do, I’m all about doing it as much as possible. Meanness, selfishness, obviously.

DS: What’s a trait you deplore in yourself?

Caribou: It’s probably twined with my possessiveness and being too controlling of the things I’m doing, which is probably related to the fact I’m so excited to do things. That’s the flip side of it, I suppose. Even more so, my self-centeredness. I spend all my time making this music, and I’m really proud of it and happy with it, but I kind of feel it is indulging my interests.

DS: You think that might be a negative?

Caribou: I do, because there are better things I could be doing in this world. I don’t know, I could be more helpful to humanity than just sitting in my room making music, but I enjoy doing it so much that I make the decision to do it.

DS: That’s a challenge for any human of whether or not to pursue something you think is a greater good or indulge yourself. How do you wrestle with that question?

Caribou: I guess like most people I avoid it to a certain degree. I hopefully strike some kind of compromise, but very heavy on doing what I’m excited about.

DS: Well, we need music in this world and if people are responding to it, you’re giving something to them.

Caribou: Yeah, I hope so, or maybe you are just trying to make me feel good.

DS: Maybe. [Laughs] Hillary or Barack?

Caribou: My gut reaction would be Barack, but I’m not really on top of American politics to endorse either.

DS: What do you think of Gordon Brown?

Caribou: He’s a funny one to pin down. I can’t figure him out. The effect of having him in government is probably going to be pretty close to the effect of having Tony Blair in government, which is a shame. I’d like to see someone more old Labour and Socialist, I guess. There’s always a hint that he is that, but I don’t think it will be reflected in his policies.

DS: What would be a bigger turn-off for you in bed, someone who was overly flatulent, or someone who spoke in a baby voice?

Caribou: I could get over the baby voice, but the flatulence is a tough one to stomach.

DS: Do you have a favorite curse word?

Caribou: Nothing is springing to mind.

DS: Favorite euphemism for breasts?

Caribou: Nope.

DS: If you had to choose between the destruction of the entire continent of Africa or the entire continent of Asia, which would you choose?

Caribou: Oh, God. So, population-wise. It’s tempting…I think that is the only way to choose. Killing a greater number of people has to be a greater evil. That’s maybe the bottom line. I would hate to make that decision.

DS: What are traits you respect in a woman?

Caribou: The same traits I look for in anybody else in the world: kindness, thoughtfulness.

DS: It doesn’t differ in men?

Caribou: No. Being a nice human being is what I look for in anybody.

DS: What’s your most treasured possession?

Caribou: I have a massive record collection I obsess over, and it would be hard to let that go.

DS: Any favorite films?

Caribou: I haven’t been able to see any in the last couple of months, but in the last year I went through a complete Herzog obsession. I watched all of his films, I read Herzog on Herzog and even read Kinsky’s biography. Almost all of his films are incredible.

DS: What difficult question in an interview do you anticipate but are never asked?

Caribou: I actually don’t anticipate the difficult ones, which is why when you asked me to destroy one continent I didn’t see that one coming.

DS: What question are you tired of answering?

Caribou: The ones I get asked the most, and I don’t mind answering them, but I don’t relish answering them: I had to change my name from Manitoba to Caribou a couple years back due a law suit. I don’t mind this one anymore, but at first I got asked that in every interview. And also, the connection between mathematics and music, which you asked me in a form. That’s a valid question, though, because it’s a point of interest about the way that I work. The lawsuit is like reciting a history of facts I’d rather forget.

DS: In the last year, where have you drawn most of your influence, and you can’t have been listening to them beyond a year ago.

Caribou: The big thing for me in the last year that is reflected in this album more than in previous ones is songwriting. I never wrote songs I just built tracks out of loops. There were melodies in them, but there wasn’t any structure to the songs. One artist I didn’t’ listen to before a year ago was Ariel Pink who is a lo-fi indie songwriter and producer. His production is amazing, but it turns people off because it’s so lo-fi; but also, his song-writing is amazing.



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Wikinews
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Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.


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August 22, 2005

Innovator of synthesizers Robert Moog, dead at 71

Innovator of synthesizers Robert Moog, dead at 71

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Monday, August 22, 2005

The logo of Moog Music.

Robert A. Moog, inventor, founder of Moog Music, and musical revolutionary, died Sunday at the age of 71 in his Ashville, North Carolina home.

Moog was diagnosed with brain cancer in April and underwent treatment for it.

Thoug Bob Moog is best knwon for his bringing of synthesizers into popular music and his appreciation for “the magical connection” between musicians and their instruments, Moog had a childhood interest with the theremin, an early electronic musical instrument. He developed his first synthesizer (the Moog Modular Synthesizer) in 1963, while still a Ph.D student at Cornell University. He was recognized with the Grammy Trustees Award for lifetime achievement in 1970.

Moog is survived by his wife and five children who have announced the formation of The Bob Moog Memorial Fund for the advancement of electronic music.

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