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July 6, 2011

Despite speculation, aides say Biden will remain on Obama ticket

Despite speculation, aides say Biden will remain on Obama ticket

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Wednesday, July 6, 2011

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
Image: Pat Arnow.

Vice President Joe Biden
Image: Andrew Cutraro.

Aides from U.S. President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign rejected predictions published in the New York Post on Monday that Obama was looking to replace Vice President Joe Biden with New York governor Andrew Cuomo as his running mate. The aides repeated that Biden would be on the ticket as the vice presidential nominee of the Democratic Party, just as he was during the .

According to the Post, former San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown made the claim earlier in the year. He characterized Cuomo as “a big name, a big-state governor, and a Democrat who is taking on the issue of public-employee salaries and pensions. Plus, he looks good.” The most recent prediction came from former New York GOP chairman William Powers, who reportedly told the Post “I don’t think there’s any doubt Obama is going to pick him (Cuomo) as his running mate. The president is in trouble and Biden doesn’t bring anything to his ticket.”

Biden, 68, previously confirmed to The New York Times in October that he would be on the 2012 ticket after rumors spread by journalist Bob Woodward suggested that Obama wanted to swap Biden with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Biden stated that Obama had already asked him to run.

Cuomo, 53, began his governorship earlier this year and signed a bill last month legalizing same-sex marriage. He referred to the rumors as “political chatter and silliness”. He is speculated to make a run for president in 2016.



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January 12, 2010

Former U.S. governor Palin signs TV deal with Fox News

Former U.S. governor Palin signs TV deal with Fox News

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Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Sarah Palin in 2008.
Image: Bruce Tuten.

According to a report by the New York Times that has now been confirmed by Fox News, former United States governor of Alaska and Sarah Palin has signed a multi-year deal to work as a news contributor for American television station Fox News. The deal is effective immediately, and Palin will reportedly contribute regularly to all Fox stations. The monetary terms to the deal have not yet been disclosed, but the agreement is rumored to be for three years.

“Governor Palin has captivated everyone on both sides of the political spectrum…,” said Bill Shine, Fox News’s vice president of programing,”We are excited to add her dynamic voice to the Fox News lineup,” he added in his comments.

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As well as contributing, Palin will also be hosting a new program slated to air on Fox News. Called Real American Stories, the series will portray stories of overcoming obstacles during current times and through current social or economic problems that may be going on at the time. The series has no planned release date, but will air sometime within 2010.

Palin released a statement herself Monday afternoon. “I am thrilled to be joining the great talent and management team at Fox News. It’s wonderful to be part of a place that so values fair and balanced news,” she said.

After serving as mayor of the town of Wasilla, Palin was elected governor of Alaska in 2006. U.S. Republican candidate John McCain picked Palin to serve as his running mate in the 2008 U.S. Presidential election, where she and McCain lost to Democrat Barack Obama and his running mate Joe Biden. In July 2009, she resigned from the governor position of Alaska governor, possibly opening up a run for U.S. president in 2012.



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January 11, 2010

US Senate Majority leader Harry Reid criticized over \”Negro\” comments

US Senate Majority leader Harry Reid criticized over “Negro” comments

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Monday, January 11, 2010

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Senator Harry Reid
Image: United States Congress.

Harry Reid, the Nevada Democrat who is US Senate Majority leader, is under a lot of criticism over comments he made during the 2008 United States presidential election, toward US President Barack Obama. The highlighted comment made by Reid was calling Obama a “light-skinned” black man “with no Negro dialect unless he wanted to have one.” The remarks were released in a book co-written by Time magazine reporter Mark Halperin, and New York magazine reporter John Heileman.

Reid has since apologized for “using such a poor choice of words.” President Obama quickly accepted the apology. Reid has been a partner with the Obama Administration on issues such as health care reform. Democratic Party chairman Tim Kaine told Meet the Press “the comments were unfortunate and they were insensitive”, but “I think the case is closed because President Obama has spoken directly with the leader [Reid] and accepted his apology. […] We’re moving on.”

Members of the Republican Party have called on Reid to resign over his comments. Party chairperson Michael Steele told Fox News Sunday “There is this standard where the Democrats feel that they can say these things and they can apologize when it … comes from the mouths of their own. But if it comes from anyone else, it’s racism,”. Having appeared alongside Kaine, where the Democrat Party chairman stated the case was closed, Steele argued that there was a double standard, on the basis of then-Senator Obama calling in 2002 calling for Trent Lott, at that time the majority leader, to be ousted for supporting the views of Strom Thurmond, who stood as a segregationist Presidential candidate in 1948.

The book Game Change published today, also says that New York Senator Chuck Schumer encouraged Barack Obama to run in early 2006, even though he later endorsed his former colleague Hillary Clinton. Other revelations included that John McCain’s aides were concerned about Sarah Palin’s failure to understand basic facts prior to her ABC News interviews with Charles Gibson, including why North Korea and South Korea are separate countries.

Co-authors Halpern and Heileman have a history of vocal criticism of media coverage of the 2008 Presidential election. In late 2008, Daily Kos reporter Jed Lewison drew attention to comments by Halpern, on-stage with Heilmen, asserting the reportage was, “extreme bias, extreme pro-Obama coverage”; he characterised election coverage as, “the most disgusting failure of people in our business since the Iraq war”. Halpern’s centrepiece example was an analysis of New York Times profiles on the prospective First Ladies; overlooking earlier NYT coverage that reported on Obama’s Caucasian ancestors being slave owners.



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 22, 2009

Former U.S. Presidential candidate Gene Amondson dies following a stroke

Former U.S. Presidential candidate Gene Amondson dies following a stroke

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Wednesday, July 22, 2009

2008 United States Presidential Election
Wikinews Election 2008.svg
2008 U.S. Presidential Election stories
  • 9 March 2012: Super Tuesday 2012: ‘Joe the Plumber’ wins GOP congressional primary
  • 23 March 2010: Non-profit ACORN plans to shut down
  • 11 January 2010: US Senate Majority leader Harry Reid criticized over “Negro” comments
  • 22 July 2009: Former U.S. Presidential candidate Gene Amondson dies following a stroke
  • 22 January 2009: Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign “HOPE” poster discovered

Gene Amondson
Image: Prohibition Party.

Preacher, painter and prohibition activist Gene Amondson, best known for his runs as the U.S. presidential nominee for one faction of the Prohibition Party in 2004 and as the party’s de facto nominee in 2008, died yesterday surrounded by his four children after falling into a coma following a stroke. He was 65 years old.

Amondson was part of the Prohibition Party split in 2004 that led to two tickets. Although he received few votes, Amondson finished in third place in four Louisiana parishes, the best showing by a Prohibition Party candidate since 1960. The leader of the counter ticket, Earl Dodge, died in 2007 while campaigning for the party’s 2008 nomination, leaving no opposition to Amondson as the party’s leader.

He was strongly opposed to the sale of alcohol. As an activist, he filmed documentaries and held demonstrations supporting his cause.

Amondson made many appearances on television, including two visits to the Oprah Winfrey Show as a painter and was interviewed by Jon Stewart on the Daily Show during his 2004 run.

He was also interviewed by Wikinews in June 2008, during his second presidential campaign.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday, July 25 at Amondson’s home town of Vashon Island, Washington.



Spoken content icon This article features in a News Brief from Audio Wikinews:

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  • “Wikinews interviews Gene Amondson, Prohibition Party presidential nominee” — Wikinews, June 6, 2008

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Former U.S. Presidential candidate dies following a stroke

Wednesday, July 22, 2009

2008 U.S. Presidential Election stories

Gene Amondson

Preacher, painter and prohibition activist Gene Amondson, best known for his runs as the U.S. presidential nominee for one faction of the Prohibition Party in 2004 and as the party’s de facto nominee in 2008, died yesterday surrounded by his four children after falling into a coma following a stroke. He was 65 years old.

Amondson was part of the Prohibition Party split in 2004 that led to two tickets. Although he received few votes, Amondson finished in third place in four Louisiana parishes, the best showing by a Prohibition Party candidate since 1960. The leader of the counter ticket, Earl Dodge, died in 2007 while campaigning for the party’s 2008 nomination, leaving no opposition to Amondson as the party’s leader.

He was strongly opposed to the sale of alcohol. As an activist, he filmed documentaries and held demonstrations supporting his cause.

Amondson made many appearances on television, including two visits to the Oprah Winfrey Show as a painter and was interviewed by Jon Stewart on the Daily Show during his 2008 run.

He was also interviewed by Wikinews in June 2008, during his presidential campaign.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday, July 25 at Amondson’s home town of Vashon Island, Washington.


Related news

Sources

External links


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 22, 2009

Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign “HOPE” poster discovered

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.
Image: Shepard Fairey for the Obama Campaign..

Netizens have discovered the photograph that was used to create the iconic Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.

Los Angeles, California street artist Shepard Fairey‘s poster design is an almost exact match to an Associated Press photo from October 2006 or earlier. Prior reports beginning on January 14, 2009 claimed that the poster was based on a different photo, a shot by Reuters photographer Jim Young from January 2007. However, on January 20, 2009 Flickr user stevesimula and blog commenters identified the Associated Press photo that appears to be a much closer match.

Fairey had revealed that he found the photographic basis for his four-color screen-printed design using Google Image Search, but could not or would not identify which photo he used. News broke of a supposed source only days ago. According to an earlier attempted analysis by Michael Cramer, it was a photo from TIME magazine which was reversed and stretched slightly. That photo was credited to “Jonathan Daniel” of Getty Images, but this turned out to be a misattribution. Reporter James Danziger of The Daily Beast tracked down the actual photographer for the TIME shot, Jim Young, and in his words “solved the biggest photographic mystery of the 2008 election”. Reuters also celebrated their photo as the basis for such a phenomenon as Fairey’s poster, and a print of the photo was sold to the Museum of Fine Arts. But it took only a few days for internet sleuths to show that, while similar, the Jim Young photo was not the one Fairey used.

The most convincing evidence that a different photo is indeed the one comes from Flickr: stevesimula produced a graphic comparing the two purported sources. The side lighting in the alternative photo creates highlight and shadow areas closely matching those Fairey used in his high-contrast stencil-like image, and the overlaid images line up precisely from Obama’s eyes to the shadow on his collar to his tie. Jim Young’s photo would have required manipulation to simply match the profile of Fairey’s design, even without considering details like the highlights and shadows.

The actual photo came from the Associated Press, as Wikimedians discovered using the “reverse image search engine” TinEye.com. That tip led photographer Tom Gralish of The Philadelphia Inquirer to the original photo through a Google image search for both “Obama” and “associated press”. The original contained IPTC metadata identifying the creator as Mannie Garcia, which Gralish quickly confirmed. The shot came from an April 2006 event where George Clooney, not then-Senator Obama, was the main attraction: Clooney was addressing the National Press Club about his trip to Darfur.

Fairey’s appropriation raises questions of intellectual property, as apparently no attempt was made to secure reproduction rights from the Associated Press. Sales of the image (on posters, clothing, and other paraphernalia) were used to fund the production of more posters in support of the Obama campaign, and raised Fairey’s public image considerably. A large hand-finished collage version was recently acquired by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery. The purchase price is not known.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Tom Gralish “Found – AGAIN – the Poster Source Photo”. Scene on the Road, January 21, 2009
  • stevesimula “fairey poster photo source?”. Flickr, January 20, 2009
  • James Danziger “Obama Photo Mystery Solved!”. The Daily Beast, January 19, 2009
  • Adam Pasick “Iconic Obama poster based on Reuters photo”. Reuters Blogs: Photographers, January 15, 2009
  • Michael Cramer “Obama “Hope” source.”. Flickr, January 14, 2009
  • Tom Gralish “MYSTERY SOLVED! The Obama Poster Photographer ID’d”. Scene on the Road, January 14, 2009
  • Dick Meyer “Hillary, Barack And Us: CBS’ Dick Meyer Puts Voters On the Couch”. CBS News, December 20, 2006
  • Robert Ellman “Reminiscing About the Future: Barack Obama’s Inauguration Speech”. Intrepid Liberal Journal, October 23, 2006
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign “HOPE” poster discovered

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.
Image: Shepard Fairey for the Obama Campaign..

Netizens have discovered the photograph that was used to create the iconic Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.

Los Angeles, California street artist Shepard Fairey‘s poster design is an almost exact match to an Associated Press photo from October 2006 or earlier. Prior reports beginning on January 14, 2009 claimed that the poster was based on a different photo, a shot by Reuters photographer Jim Young from January 2007. However, on January 20, 2009 Flickr user stevesimula and blog commenters identified the Associated Press photo that appears to be a much closer match.

Fairey had revealed that he found the photographic basis for his four-color screen-printed design using Google Image Search, but could not or would not identify which photo he used. News broke of a supposed source only days ago. According to an earlier attempted analysis by Michael Cramer, it was a photo from TIME magazine which was reversed and stretched slightly. That photo was credited to “Jonathan Daniel” of Getty Images, but this turned out to be a misattribution. Reporter James Danziger of The Daily Beast tracked down the actual photographer for the TIME shot, Jim Young, and in his words “solved the biggest photographic mystery of the 2008 election”. Reuters also celebrated their photo as the basis for such a phenomenon as Fairey’s poster, and a print of the photo was sold to the Museum of Fine Arts. But it took only a few days for internet sleuths to show that, while similar, the Jim Young photo was not the one Fairey used.

The most convincing evidence that a different photo is indeed the one comes from Flickr: stevesimula produced a graphic comparing the two purported sources. The side lighting in the alternative photo creates highlight and shadow areas closely matching those Fairey used in his high-contrast stencil-like image, and the overlaid images line up precisely from Obama’s eyes to the shadow on his collar to his tie. Jim Young’s photo would have required manipulation to simply match the profile of Fairey’s design, even without considering details like the highlights and shadows.

The actual photo came from the Associated Press, as Wikimedians discovered using the “reverse image search engine” TinEye.com. That tip led photographer Tom Gralish of The Philadelphia Inquirer to the original photo through a Google image search for both “Obama” and “associated press”. The original contained IPTC metadata identifying the creator as Mannie Garcia, which Gralish quickly confirmed. The shot came from an April 2006 event where George Clooney, not then-Senator Obama, was the main attraction: Clooney was addressing the National Press Club about his trip to Darfur.

Fairey’s appropriation raises questions of intellectual property, as apparently no attempt was made to secure reproduction rights from the Associated Press. Sales of the image (on posters, clothing, and other paraphernalia) were used to fund the production of more posters in support of the Obama campaign, and raised Fairey’s public image considerably. A large hand-finished collage version was recently acquired by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery. The purchase price is not known.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Tom Gralish “Found – AGAIN – the Poster Source Photo”. Scene on the Road, January 21, 2009
  • stevesimula “fairey poster photo source?”. Flickr, January 20, 2009
  • James Danziger “Obama Photo Mystery Solved!”. The Daily Beast, January 19, 2009
  • Adam Pasick “Iconic Obama poster based on Reuters photo”. Reuters Blogs: Photographers, January 15, 2009
  • Michael Cramer “Obama “Hope” source.”. Flickr, January 14, 2009
  • Tom Gralish “MYSTERY SOLVED! The Obama Poster Photographer ID’d”. Scene on the Road, January 14, 2009
  • Dick Meyer “Hillary, Barack And Us: CBS’ Dick Meyer Puts Voters On the Couch”. CBS News, December 20, 2006
  • Robert Ellman “Reminiscing About the Future: Barack Obama’s Inauguration Speech”. Intrepid Liberal Journal, October 23, 2006
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign “HOPE” poster discovered

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.
Image: Shepard Fairey for the Obama Campaign..

Netizens have discovered the photograph that was used to create the iconic Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.

Los Angeles, California street artist Shepard Fairey‘s poster design is an almost exact match to an Associated Press photo from October 2006 or earlier. Prior reports beginning on January 14, 2009 claimed that the poster was based on a different photo, a shot by Reuters photographer Jim Young from January 2007. However, on January 20, 2009 Flickr user stevesimula and blog commenters identified the Associated Press photo that appears to be a much closer match.

Fairey had revealed that he found the photographic basis for his four-color screen-printed design using Google Image Search, but could not or would not identify which photo he used. News broke of a supposed source only days ago. According to an earlier attempted analysis by Michael Cramer, it was a photo from TIME magazine which was reversed and stretched slightly. That photo was credited to “Jonathan Daniel” of Getty Images, but this turned out to be a misattribution. Reporter James Danziger of The Daily Beast tracked down the actual photographer for the TIME shot, Jim Young, and in his words “solved the biggest photographic mystery of the 2008 election”. Reuters also celebrated their photo as the basis for such a phenomenon as Fairey’s poster, and a print of the photo was sold to the Museum of Fine Arts. But it took only a few days for internet sleuths to show that, while similar, the Jim Young photo was not the one Fairey used.

The most convincing evidence that a different photo is indeed the one comes from Flickr: stevesimula produced a graphic comparing the two purported sources. The side lighting in the alternative photo creates highlight and shadow areas closely matching those Fairey used in his high-contrast stencil-like image, and the overlaid images line up precisely from Obama’s eyes to the shadow on his collar to his tie. Jim Young’s photo would have required manipulation to simply match the profile of Fairey’s design, even without considering details like the highlights and shadows.

The actual photo came from the Associated Press, as Wikimedians discovered using the “reverse image search engine” TinEye.com. That tip led photographer Tom Gralish of The Philadelphia Inquirer to the original photo through a Google image search for both “Obama” and “associated press”. The original contained IPTC metadata identifying the creator as Mannie Garcia, which Gralish quickly confirmed. The shot came from an April 2006 event where George Clooney, not then-Senator Obama, was the main attraction: Clooney was addressing the National Press Club about his trip to Darfur.

Fairey’s appropriation raises questions of intellectual property, as apparently no attempt was made to secure reproduction rights from the Associated Press. Sales of the image (on posters, clothing, and other paraphernalia) were used to fund the production of more posters in support of the Obama campaign, and raised Fairey’s public image considerably. A large hand-finished collage version was recently acquired by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery. The purchase price is not known.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Tom Gralish “Found – AGAIN – the Poster Source Photo”. Scene on the Road, January 21, 2009
  • stevesimula “fairey poster photo source?”. Flickr, January 20, 2009
  • James Danziger “Obama Photo Mystery Solved!”. The Daily Beast, January 19, 2009
  • Adam Pasick “Iconic Obama poster based on Reuters photo”. Reuters Blogs: Photographers, January 15, 2009
  • Michael Cramer “Obama “Hope” source.”. Flickr, January 14, 2009
  • Tom Gralish “MYSTERY SOLVED! The Obama Poster Photographer ID’d”. Scene on the Road, January 14, 2009
  • Dick Meyer “Hillary, Barack And Us: CBS’ Dick Meyer Puts Voters On the Couch”. CBS News, December 20, 2006
  • Robert Ellman “Reminiscing About the Future: Barack Obama’s Inauguration Speech”. Intrepid Liberal Journal, October 23, 2006
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign “HOPE” poster discovered

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.
Image: Shepard Fairey for the Obama Campaign..

Netizens have discovered the photograph that was used to create the iconic Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, which became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.

Los Angeles, California street artist Shepard Fairey‘s poster design is an almost exact match to an Associated Press photo from October 2006 or earlier. Prior reports beginning on January 14, 2009 claimed that the poster was based on a different photo, a shot by Reuters photographer Jim Young from January 2007. However, on January 20, 2009 Flickr user stevesimula and blog commenters identified the Associated Press photo that appears to be a much closer match.

Fairey had revealed that he found the photographic basis for his four-color screen-printed design using Google Image Search, but could not or would not identify which photo he used. News broke of a supposed source only days ago. According to an earlier attempted analysis by Michael Cramer, it was a photo from TIME magazine which was reversed and stretched slightly. That photo was credited to “Jonathan Daniel” of Getty Images, but this turned out to be a misattribution. Reporter James Danziger of The Daily Beast tracked down the actual photographer for the TIME shot, Jim Young, and in his words “solved the biggest photographic mystery of the 2008 election”. Reuters also celebrated their photo as the basis for such a phenomenon as Fairey’s poster, and a print of the photo was sold to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. But it took only a few days for internet sleuths to show that, while similar, the Jim Young photo was not the one Fairey used.

The most convincing evidence that a different photo is indeed the one comes from Flickr: stevesimula produced a graphic comparing the two purported sources. The side lighting in the alternative photo creates highlight and shadow areas closely matching those Fairey used in his high-contrast stencil-like image, and the overlaid images line up precisely from Obama’s eyes to the shadow on his collar to his tie. Jim Young’s photo would have required manipulation to simply match the profile of Fairey’s design, even without considering details like the highlights and shadows.

The actual photo came from the Associated Press, as Wikimedians discovered using the “reverse image search engine” TinEye.com. That tip led photographer Tom Gralish of The Philadelphia Inquirer to the original photo through a Google image search for both “Obama” and “associated press”. The original contained IPTC metadata identifying the creator as Mannie Garcia, which Gralish quickly confirmed. The shot came from an April 2006 event where George Clooney, not then-Senator Obama, was the main attraction: Clooney was addressing the National Press Club about his trip to Darfur.

Fairey’s appropriation raises questions of intellectual property, as apparently no attempt was made to secure reproduction rights from the Associated Press. Sales of the image (on posters, clothing, and other paraphernalia) were used to fund the production of more posters in support of the Obama campaign, and raised Fairey’s public image considerably. A large hand-finished collage version was recently acquired by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery. The purchase price is not known.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Tom Gralish “Found – AGAIN – the Poster Source Photo”. Scene on the Road, January 21, 2009
  • stevesimula “fairey poster photo source?”. Flickr, January 20, 2009
  • James Danziger “Obama Photo Mystery Solved!”. The Daily Beast, January 19, 2009
  • Adam Pasick “Iconic Obama poster based on Reuters photo”. Reuters Blogs: Photographers, January 15, 2009
  • Michael Cramer “Obama “Hope” source.”. Flickr, January 14, 2009
  • Tom Gralish “MYSTERY SOLVED! The Obama Poster Photographer ID’d”. Scene on the Road, January 14, 2009
  • Dick Meyer “Hillary, Barack And Us: CBS’ Dick Meyer Puts Voters On the Couch”. CBS News, December 20, 2006
  • Robert Ellman “Reminiscing About the Future: Barack Obama’s Inauguration Speech”. Intrepid Liberal Journal, October 23, 2006


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign \”HOPE\” poster discovered

Photo source for Barack Obama presidential campaign “HOPE” poster discovered

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, that became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.
Image: Shepard Fairey for the Obama Campaign..

Netizens have discovered the photograph that was used to create the iconic Barack Obama “HOPE” poster, which became a national symbol during his 2008 presidential campaign in the United States.

Los Angeles, California street artist Shepard Fairey’s poster design is an almost exact match to an Associated Press photo from October 2006 or earlier. Prior reports beginning on January 14, 2009 claimed that the poster was based on a different photo, a shot by Reuters photographer Jim Young from January 2007. However, on January 20, 2009 Flickr user stevesimula and blog commenters identified the Associated Press photo that appears to be a much closer match.

Fairey had revealed that he found the photographic basis for his four-color screen-printed design using Google Image Search, but could not or would not identify which photo he used. News broke of a supposed source only days ago. According to an earlier attempted analysis by Michael Cramer, it was a photo from TIME magazine which was reversed and stretched slightly. That photo was credited to “Jonathan Daniel” of Getty Images, but this turned out to be a misattribution. Reporter James Danziger of The Daily Beast tracked down the actual photographer for the TIME shot, Jim Young, and in his words “solved the biggest photographic mystery of the 2008 election”. Reuters also celebrated their photo as the basis for such a phenomenon as Fairey’s poster, and a print of the photo was sold to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. But it took only a few days for internet sleuths to show that, while similar, the Jim Young photo was not the one Fairey used.

The most convincing evidence that a different photo is indeed the one comes from Flickr: stevesimula produced a graphic comparing the two purported sources. The side lighting in the alternative photo creates highlight and shadow areas closely matching those Fairey used in his high-contrast stencil-like image, and the overlaid images line up precisely from Obama’s eyes to the shadow on his collar to his tie. Jim Young’s photo would have required manipulation to simply match the profile of Fairey’s design, even without considering details like the highlights and shadows.

The actual photo came from the Associated Press, as Wikimedians discovered using the “reverse image search engine” TinEye.com. That tip led photographer Tom Gralish of The Philadelphia Inquirer to the original photo through a Google image search for both “Obama” and “associated press”. The original contained IPTC metadata identifying the creator as Mannie Garcia, which Gralish quickly confirmed. The shot came from an April 2006 event where George Clooney, not then-Senator Obama, was the main attraction: Clooney was addressing the National Press Club about his trip to Darfur.

Fairey’s appropriation raises questions of intellectual property, as apparently no attempt was made to secure reproduction rights from the Associated Press. Sales of the image (on posters, clothing, and other paraphernalia) were used to fund the production of more posters in support of the Obama campaign, and raised Fairey’s public image considerably. A large hand-finished collage version was recently acquired by the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery. The purchase price is not known.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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