Wiki Actu en

December 10, 2014

Senate publish report on CIA torture and misinformation

Senate publish report on CIA torture and misinformation

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

United States
Related articles
Location of United States
USA orthographic.svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The US Senate Report on CIA Detention Interrogation Program that details the use of torture during CIA detention and interrogation.

A report released by the US Senate Intelligence Committee yesterday concluded that the CIA misinformed the White House and Congress about its imprisonment and interrogation of suspected terrorists during the years after the September 11 attacks.

The committee released an executive summary yesterday ahead of its full 6,000-page report. The summary documented instances where detainees were kept awake for as long as a week and suggested that the agency had waterboarded more suspects than it previously disclosed.

The report also revealed that officials in the Bush administration were often told about these practices long after the fact. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and Secretary of State Colin Powell were not told of the CIA’s operations until a year after they had begun. President Bush was briefed in 2006, four years after the CIA commenced its “Enhanced Interrogation Techniques” program.

The released documents refutes the effectiveness of the program and the accuracy of the information gathered. Previously, the Bush administration had defended its use, claiming that the intelligence garnered helped stop terrorist plots and capture al-Qaeda leadership, including Osama bin Laden. The executive summary examines case studies from the CIA’s internal records which the committee says disputes those defenses.

CIA Director John O. Brennan acknowledged many of the failures outlined by the committee, but also rebuked it for what he called an “incomplete and selective picture of what occurred.” Republican Senators have been critical of the report with Richard Burr calling it “a fiction”, and Marco Rubio stating that Senate Democrats published the report out of “partisan joy” with the intention of “trying to embarrass people in the Bush administration.”



Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Senate Intelligence Committee report on CIA torture

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 6, 2010

Obama nominates James Clapper for Director of National Intelligence

Obama nominates James Clapper for Director of National Intelligence

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, June 6, 2010

United States
Related articles
Location of United States
USA orthographic.svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

James Clapper.

United States President Barack Obama has nominated retired Air Force Lieutenant General James Clapper to be the new director of National Intelligence. The position had been left vacant when the previous director of national intelligence was forced to leave due to a series of security failures. James Clapper now awaits confirmation by the US Senate.

Barack Obama has requested a quick confirmation from the Senate. Both US Democratic Party and Republican Party senior representatives in the Senate Intelligence Committee have publicly expressed their reservation about the nomination. According to to the Associated Press, Republican senator Kit Bond doubted Clapper’s ability to command among some of the intelligence community personalities. “I don’t think Clapper’s the right person for the job,” he said. The Associated Press, informed by senior congressional staff, reported that the Republican senator had not been invited to discuss the nomination and is considering asking his Republican support to block the nomination.

Previous director of national intelligence Dennis C. Blair quit two weeks ago in the sequence of a series of security failures, including the Fort Hood shooting incident.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 23, 2009

US interrogation techniques received early approval, report suggests

US interrogation techniques received early approval, report suggests

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search


Bookmark-new.svg

Thursday, April 23, 2009

United States
Related articles
Location of United States
USA orthographic.svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Yesterday, the United States Senate Armed Services Committee released a report containing previously-unreleased memos which conclude that CIA and Department of Defense officials were already exploring the use of “enhanced interrogation” techniques in early 2002, eight months before Justice Department lawyers approved their use. Also released yesterday was a report by the Senate Intelligence Committee confirming that Bush administration officials, including Condoleeza Rice and John Ashcroft, had backed such tactics in secret meetings through June 2002. In the days following Rice’s approval, the Justice Department had given the legal rationale for the use of waterboarding against Abu Zubaydah.

The Armed Service Committee report also indicates that Pentagon officials consulted with the military’s Joint Personnel Recovery Agency (JPRA) as early as December 2001. Many of the techniques were reverse-engineered from the JPRA’s Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) program, which trains personnel to resist interrogation by enemies who use tactics banned by the Geneva Conventions.

The reports undermine claims made by several Bush-era officials that the leaked events of Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay were the result of “bad apples” from the bottom of both the CIA and the Pentagon’s command structure. Says Carl Levin, chair of the intelligence committee: “The paper trail on abuse leads to top civilian leaders, and our report connects the dots.”



Sources


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 6, 2008

CIA Director confirms use of waterboarding on terror suspects

CIA Director confirms use of waterboarding on terror suspects

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, February 6, 2008

General Michael Hayden, USAF, CIA Director

The director of the Central Intelligence Agency has confirmed that his agency used the extreme interrogation technique known as waterboarding on three terrorism suspects nearly five years ago. In testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, Michael Hayden urged lawmakers not to place restrictions on the interrogation methods available to U.S. intelligence agencies.

Director Hayden’s testimony was the most detailed description to date of the CIA’s use of “enhanced” interrogation techniques.

“In the life of the CIA detention program, we have held fewer than 100 people,” he said. “Fewer than a third of those people have had any techniques, enhanced techniques, used against them in the CIA program.”

He confirmed that among those “enhanced” techniques used was waterboarding – which induces the feeling of imminent drowning, and which critics say amounts to torture.

“Waterboarding has been used on only three detainees,” he said.

He said those three detainees are Khalid Sheikh Mohammed – one of the architects of the September 11th attacks on New York and Washington, Abu Zubaydah – who is believed to have been a top al-Qaida strategist, and Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri – who is believed to have played a key role in the bombing of the USS Cole. All three are being held at the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay.

Hayden said waterboarding was used against the three detainees nearly five years ago because of circumstances at the time, including the belief that additional attacks against the United States were imminent.

Hayden defended the CIA’s use of extreme interrogation techniques as lawful, and urged lawmakers not to impose restrictions on such methods.

Congress is considering legislation that would restrict the CIA to using only the interrogation techniques authorized by the U.S. Army’s field manual, which does not include waterboarding.



Sources


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 9, 2007

CIA chief to testify before Congress on interrogations

CIA chief to testify before Congress on interrogations

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, December 9, 2007

Central Intelligence Agency chief Michael Hayden

The United States Congress has launched its own inquiry into a decision by the U.S spy agency to destroy tapes of interrogations of terror suspects, with Central Intelligence Agency chief Michael Hayden testifying before lawmakers this week.

The Chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Democrat Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, says Hayden will appear before his panel.

“CIA director Michael Hayden is going appear before our committee on this coming Tuesday and talk about interrogation and techniques,” said Rockefeller.

During an appearance on the CBS television program Face the Nation, Rockefeller made clear members have a lot of questions about the destroyed videotapes.

“Were there things on those tapes that they did not want to have seen, that did not conform to what the attorney general would allow them to do?” he said.

Rockefeller indicated the session will take place behind closed doors, to enable law makers to delve into areas that are still considered top secret, and have to do with specific interrogation procedures.

The CIA director disclosed the destroyed videotapes last Thursday, after he got word that their existence had been uncovered by the news media. The tapes which were made in 2002, showed the interrogation of top terror suspects. They were destroyed in 2005, and Congressional critics charge that could amount to tampering with legal evidence and obstruction of justice.

Democrat Joe Biden of Delaware, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and former chair of the Judiciary panel, says the preliminary joint inquiry by the Justice Department and the CIA announced yesterday is not enough.

Biden, who is running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, was interviewed on ABC’s This Week.

“I think that Hayden is not to be the judge of whether or not his condoning the destroying of the tapes was lawful. It appears as though there may be an obstruction of justice charge here, tampering with evidence, destroying evidence,and I think this is one case where it really does call for a special counsel,” said Biden.

Hayden told CIA employees Thursday the tapes were destroyed out of fears that if they ever became public, the identities of the interrogators would be revealed and their lives would be in danger.

President Bush gave the intelligence community the go-ahead to use enhanced interrogation techniques on terror suspects following the September 11th 2001, attacks on the United States.

The Bush administration has refused to specify which methods are permitted, but critics charge some amount to torture, including a procedure known as waterboarding, which simulates drowning.

Republican Senator John McCain of Arizona has called for the White House to publicly disavow the use of harsh interrogation techniques.

He appeared on the Fox News Sunday television program.

“What this does in a larger sense is it harms the credibility and the moral standing of America in the world again,” said McCain. “There will be skepticism and cynicism all over the world about how we treat prisoners and whether we practice torture or not.”

Senator McCain, a former Vietnam War era prisoner of war, has been one of the most outspoken members of Congress on the treatment of detainees in the war on terror. He is campaigning to become the Republican Party’s presidential nominee.



Sources


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 8, 2007

US lawmakers and rights advocates question CIA tape destruction

US lawmakers and rights advocates question CIA tape destruction

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, December 8, 2007

CIA Director Michael Hayden

U.S. Congressional Democrats are asking the Justice Department to investigate whether the CIA’s destruction of videotapes documenting the interrogation of terrorism suspects amounts to obstruction of justice.

The acknowledgement by Central Intelligence Agency Director Michael Hayden that his agency destroyed the interrogation videotapes in 2005 sparked a firestorm of criticism among Congressional Democrats. They suggested the tapes could have provided key evidence in ongoing trials brought by terrorism suspects who are alleging they were tortured.

Senator Ted Kennedy, a Massachusetts Democrat, said, “What would cause the CIA to take this action? The answer is obvious – cover up. The agency was desperate to cover up damning evidence of their practices.”

Human Rights Watch’s Senior Counterterrorism Counsel commented to Google news saying, “The CIA was well aware that its interrogations crossed a line considered by many to be torture. Now some in the CIA may also be guilty of obstruction of justice as well – a serious felony that carries a possible 20 year sentence. There needs to be a serious criminal investigation, and those who have committed crimes should be prosecuted and convicted.”

The Democratic chairmen of the House and Senate Intelligence Committees are vowing to investigate, and other Democrats are calling on the Justice Department to do the same.

“You cannot destroy material if there is an ongoing investigation. There is a law against it,” said Senator Carl Levin of Michigan, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

At the White House, spokeswoman Dana Perino said President Bush only learned of the matter two days ago, after he was briefed by CIA Director Hayden.

The United States Capitol building, where Congress meets

“He has no recollection of being made aware of the tapes or their destruction before yesterday,” said Perino.

Perino defended the CIA interrogation program as legal and critical to national security. She said President Bush supports General Hayden’s explanation that the tapes were destroyed to protect the identities of the interrogators.

But the Senate’s number two Democrat, Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois, rejected that argument:

“The defence of the CIA is that they wanted to protect the identity of those CIA employees who were engaged in the interrogation,” said Durbin. “Mr. [Senate] President, that is not a credible defence. We know that it is possible, in fact, easy, to cover the identity and faces of those who were involved in any videotape. Something more was involved here.”

The tapes, which documented the use of tough interrogation techniques against key terror suspects in 2002, were destroyed three years later, at a time when there was increasing pressure from defence lawyers to obtain videotapes of detainee interrogations and as Congress had been probing allegations of torture.

The Bush administration has maintained it does not use torture, but refuses to say what techniques are used by intelligence agencies in interrogations of terror suspects.



Sources


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 6, 2007

President Bush defends U.S. interrogation tactics

President Bush defends U.S. interrogation tactics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, October 6, 2007

President Bush, photographed in 2005.

CIA logo.

On Friday morning, United States President George W. Bush defended interrogation tactics used by the CIA, stating that “This government does not torture people.” Bush’s comments were a response to an article in Thursday’s New York Times describing a classified 2005 Justice Department legal opinion that endorsed the use of painful physical and psychological tactics against terror suspects. Bush also claimed that “the techniques that we used have been fully disclosed to appropriate members of the US Congress.”

According to anonymous sources cited in The New York Times article, the classified 2005 legal opinion contained “an expansive endorsement of the harshest interrogation techniques ever used by the Central Intelligence Agency,” and explicitly authorized the use of tactics including head-slapping, frigid temperatures, and the simulated drowning technique known as waterboarding against terror suspects.

White House spokeswoman Dana Perino confirmed the existence of the 2005 document but did not say whether techniques such as head slapping and waterboarding constitute “torture” under U.S. law. “I’m not going to get into specific tactics,” Perino said. She added that disclosing specific interrogation methods could reduce the effectiveness of those methods by allowing terrorists to train to resist them.

Democrats expressed frustration with the Bush administration’s secrecy on the issue of interrogation tactics. “The administration can’t have it both ways,” said Senator John D. Rockefeller IV, chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee. “I’m tired of these games. They can’t say that Congress has been fully briefed while refusing to turn over key documents used to justify the legality of the program.”



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 23, 2007

Rockefeller says Iraq is draining funds

Rockefeller says Iraq is draining funds – Wikinews, the free news source

Rockefeller says Iraq is draining funds

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

Senator Jay Rockefeller (D)

Senator Jay Rockefeller (D), great-grandson of oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller and chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said that President Bush‘s “Iraq adventure” was draining funds from homeland security and other domestic priorities such as education, health care, the environment.

Rockefeller also added that he was concerned that the Bush administration was going towards a military confrontation with Iran. He said, “Do I think it’s possible that the president could get us involved marginally or even more fully in Iran as a way of distracting us from the war on terror, and from Iraq, as a way of getting past the elections in 2008? I don’t want to believe that. But after what I have been through with him … yes, I worry about it enormously.”

Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 11, 2005

President Bush claims critics are rewriting Iraq war history

President Bush claims critics are rewriting Iraq war history

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, November 11, 2005

Iraq War
Other Iraq War stories
  • 14 March 2014: Labour politician Tony Benn dies aged 88
  • 28 February 2012: U.S. Army identifies remains of last U.S. soldier unaccounted for in Iraq
  • 21 December 2011: Remaining US troops exit Iraq
  • 3 December 2010: British warship HMS Invincible put up for auction online
  • 23 October 2010: WikiLeaks releases Iraq War logs
Iraqi security forces
Armed forces in Iraq - January 2008.png
Background
  • Wikipedia article about the Iraq War

President Bush accused critics of the Iraq War of rewriting history and distorting the events that led to the U.S. invasion. In an effort to divert criticism of his administration’s decision to go to war with Iraq, Bush said that some Democrats viewed the same intelligence and came to similar conclusions. “Some Democrats and anti-war critics are now claiming we manipulated the intelligence and misled the American people about why we went to war,” Bush said.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (Democrat) responded “Attacking those patriotic Americans who have raised serious questions about the case the Bush administration made to take our country to war does not provide us a plan for success that will bring our troops home,” Reid said.

At the same time, the Senate Intelligence Committee is making progress toward an agreement on how to implement ‘phase two’ of the Iraq WMD investigation set up to investigate how administration officials used the intelligence information available in the run-up of the Iraq war. The first phase of this investigation only focused on the quality of the intelligence information. Phase two was postponed until after the November 2004 elections.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 28, 2005

Lewis \”Scooter\” Libby indicted on five charges

Lewis “Scooter” Libby indicted on five charges

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 28, 2005

I. Lewis “Scooter” Libby, Jr., chief of staff to U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney, resigned Friday following indictment on five federal felony charges.

Mr. Libby is charged with obstruction of justice, two counts of perjury to a Grand Jury, and two counts of making false statements to the FBI in the Justice Department’s investigation into the Plame leak. Mr. Libby’s resignation was accepted by Vice President Cheney. President Bush also accepted Mr. Libby’s resignation as Assistant to the President.

The indictment centers on Mr. Libby’s grand jury testimony that he learned from media sources that Joseph Wilson’s wife, Valerie Plame, worked under cover for the CIA. The Justice Department says that Mr. Libby knew of Plame’s covert status from at least four government officials, including Vice President Cheney, in the month prior to his talks with the press, but that he sought to hide that knowledge from the investigation.

No charges were filed against White House advisor Karl Rove, but he remains under scrutiny in the on-going two year investigation led by Special Counselor Patrick Fitzgerald. The Seattle Post Intelligencer reported that late Friday, three people close to the investigation stated that the individual referred to in Fitzgerald’s record as “Official A” was actually Karl Rove, the so called “senior official in the White House” who allegedly informed Libby on July 10 or 11 of 2003 that Plame was a CIA operative. The Washington Post is reporting that Rove’s “fate” will be known soon.

All five charges stem from three conversations Mr. Libby had with reporters about Valerie Plame in 2003 between July 10 and 12:

  • On or about July 10, Libby spoke with Tim Russert of NBC. Mr. Libby testified that Mr. Russert asked him if he knew Mr. Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA, and that Mr. Russert told him all reporters knew about Mr. Wilson’s wife.
The indictment alleges that Mr. Russert did not ask Mr. Libby what he knew about Wilson’s wife, nor did Mr. Russert tell him that all the reporters knew it. The indictment says that Libby knew through governmental sources that Mr. Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA.
  • On or about July 12, Mr. Libby spoke with Matthew Cooper of TIME magazine. Mr. Libby testified he told Mr. Cooper that he heard from other reporters that Mr. Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA, but he didn’t know for sure whether or not she did.
The indictment alleges that Mr. Libby did not talk about other reporters, but simply confirmed for Mr. Cooper that Mr. Wilson’s wife worked for the CIA.
  • Mr. Libby spoke with Judith Miller of The New York Times. Mr. Libby again testified that the conversation was about other reporters, and he told Ms. Miller he was unsure Mr. Wilson’s wife worked at the CIA.
The indictment claims that Libby did not talk about other reporters, and did not advise Ms. Miller he was unsure about Mr. Wilson’s wife.

In a nationally televised press conference announcing the indictment, Special Prosecutor Fitzgerald likened the alleged falsehoods of Mr. Libby’s testimony to sand being thrown in the face of a baseball umpire. The obstruction of justice count alleges that Mr. Libby made false statements while testifying before the grand jury, and attempted to mislead and deceive the grand jury by doing so.

The two false statement charges relate to FBI interviews conducted in October and November 2003. There is one charge for the July 10, 2003 interview with Mr. Russert, and another for the July 12, 2003 interview with Cooper. One perjury charges alleges Mr. Libby lied to the grand jury about his conversation with Mr .Russert. The second alleges he was lying when he testified to the grand jury that he had told reporters “I hear from other reporters Wilson’s wife works for the CIA.”

If convicted on all counts, Mr. Libby faces up to 30 years in prison and a $1.25 million fine. In a written statement delivered by his lawyer, Mr. Libby said “today is a sad day for me and my family” but is confident that he will be “completely and totally exonerated.”

Vice President Dick Cheney called Mr. Libby in a written statement one “of the most capable and talented individuals I have ever known” and stressed that he is presumed innocent until proven otherwise.

President George W. Bush called the investigation “serious” and said that Mr. Libby “worked tirelessly on behalf of the American people and sacrificed much in the service to this country.”

Background

In September 2003, CIA Director George Tenet requested a Justice Department probe of the possibility that high officials of the Bush administration leaked to journalists the secret CIA identity of Plame. In December 2003, Patrick J. Fitzgerald was appointed Special Counsel in charge of investigating the leak of the identity of covert CIA officer Valerie Plame. A grand jury was convened to hear testimony from reporters and members of the Bush administration. The federal indictment suggests that Libby lied about what he told reporters Tim Russert, Matt Cooper, and Judith Miller. “When citizens testify before grand juries they are required to tell the truth,” Mr. Fitzgerald said.

In February 2002, Joseph Wilson was asked to travel to Niger by the Central Intelligence Agency in order to investigate claims that Niger had sold yellowcake uranium to Iraq, a substance that – after a lengthy purification process – can be used to make a nuclear weapon.

On the 28th of January, 2003, President George Bush stated in his State of the Union address that, “The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa.” Much of the President’s address was focused on building support for the War in Iraq, on the grounds that Iraq had been developing Weapons of Mass Destruction, and this statement was a key part of the rationale to justify going to war.

On July 6, 2003, Wilson wrote an opinion piece in the New York Times attacking the validity of Bush’s assertion by describing how his experiences in Africa had led him to believe no such sale had taken place. He went on to accuse the Bush Administration of manipulating intelligence data in order to exaggerate the threat posed by Iraq. Ultimately, the White House was forced to retract the statement regarding Niger in the State of the Union address.

On July 14th 2003, journalist Robert Novak published a news article that disclosed the identity of Valerie Plame as a CIA operative. Novak attributed the information about Plame’s identity to “senior administration officials.” After Novak’s article was published, other news reporters speculated that Plame’s identity as a CIA operative was leaked by the Bush administration in an effort to punish Mr. Wilson for his public criticism of the administration. Valerie Plame and Joseph Wilson are married, although Valerie had been using her maiden name “Plame” in her role as a covert operative rather than using her married name.

In June 2004, President George W. Bush was questioned about the leak by the Justice Department, but not in front of the Grand Jury. Bush first promised to fire anyone in his administration who leaked the CIA identity of Plame, then later qualified this as meaning that he would only act if it could be shown that a crime was committed.

With the Grand Jury scheduled to conclude its term in October 2005, reporter Judith Miller was jailed in July 2005 for refusing to reveal the source of the Plame leak. After 85 days in jail, Miller finally testified before the Grand Jury. Several reporters, including Miller and Matthew Cooper, identified Deputy White House Chief of Staff Karl Rove and Dick Cheney’s chief of staff Lewis Libby as Bush administration sources who revealed Valerie Plame’s identity as a CIA operative.

The indictment comes at the same time as allegations mount that Vice President Cheney and his chief of staff Libby withheld crucial documents from the Senate Intelligence Committee as it was investigating the intelligence failure in the run-up to the Iraq war in 2004. Rep. Jerrold Nadler has requested to expand Fitzgerald’s investigation to clear up if the actions in the CIA leak were just a part in a larger scheme to deceive Congress into authorizing war, who was involved and whether their actions were criminal.

Related news

Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress