Wiki Actu en

August 27, 2015

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir signs peace deal

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir signs peace deal

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, August 27, 2015

South Sudan
Related articles
Location of South Sudan
South Sudan (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

Salva Kiir in the United States last year.
Image: U.S. Department of State.

Salva Kiir, the President of South Sudan, yesterday signed a deal designed to end a civil ethnic conflict that has killed thousands and displaced over two million.

Under the deal Kiir will share power with Riek Machar. Machar was Vice President but Kiir sacked him in 2013. December that year saw the dispute turn to war. Kiir is a Dinka while Machar is a Nuer, and the conflict has largely split along these racial lines.

Kiir spoke of “serious reservations” at the signing ceremony in Juba. He is concerned about a requirement to consult “First Vice President” Machar, as he will be under the deal, on policies. He is also concerned about demilitarisation of Juba.

The deal to close the 20-month conflict was negotiated in Ethiopia, where Machar signed the same deal last week. Several ceasefires have failed over months of talks. Kiir, the only leader in South Sudan since independence in 2011, sought an extension of a two-week deadline but signed yesterday after United Nations sanctions were threatened.

Both sides accused the other of continuing hostilities. The rebels claimed government forces attacked them south of Juba, but say they were victorious. Kiir claimed the rebels attacked a northern position. Kiir says international leaders were “careless” with negotiations and warned a flawed deal could do more harm.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, and UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon all expressed their approval of the deal’s signing. Kenyatta called it a “happy day for us in the region”. Earlier in the day he warned there was “no such thing as a perfect agreement” and Museveni said the conflict was “the wrong war in the wrong place at the wrong time”.



Sources[]

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 22, 2013

Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions

Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, December 22, 2013

South Sudan
Other stories from South Sudan
  • 22 December 2013: Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions
  • 26 January 2012: ‘Davos man’ versus ‘Camp Igloo’; 42nd World Economic Forum convenes in Swiss alps
  • 10 July 2011: South Sudan gains independence
  • 10 February 2011: South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed
  • 26 April 2010: Spokesman: At least 55 dead after violence in Darfur, Sudan
…More articles here
Location of South Sudan

A map showing the location of South Sudan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on South Sudan, see the South Sudan Portal
Flag of South Sudan.svg

Rebel troops under the command of Riek Machar, former vice president of South Sudan, today stated they now control a number of areas of the country including the oil-rich Unity State which borders Sudan. Government troops are attempting to take back Bor, the capital of the state of Jonglei.

Location of Unity State within South Sudan.
Image: Ivan25.

In Juba, reportedly at least 500 people were killed in the last week. The US military said three US military aircraft — CV-22 Ospreys — were attacked by the rebel troops around Bor, and four US soldiers were injured and taken to Nairobi, Kenya for treatment. At a United Nations facility in Akobo, an attack killed two Indian peacekeepers and at least eleven civilians on Thursday.

Since South Sudan’s 2011 independence from Sudan, ethnic conflicts have caused hundreds of deaths.

World leaders have reacted to the violence. UN General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon said: “I demand that all political, military and militia leaders stop hostilities and end the violence against the civilians. I call on them to do everything in their power to ensure that their followers hear their message loud and clear.”

US President Barack Obama said “any effort to seize power through the use of military force will result in the end of longstanding support from the United States and the international community”.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 10, 2011

South Sudan gains independence

South Sudan gains independence – Wikinews, the free news source

South Sudan gains independence

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
South Sudan
Other stories from South Sudan
  • 22 December 2013: Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions
  • 26 January 2012: ‘Davos man’ versus ‘Camp Igloo’; 42nd World Economic Forum convenes in Swiss alps
  • 10 July 2011: South Sudan gains independence
  • 10 February 2011: South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed
  • 26 April 2010: Spokesman: At least 55 dead after violence in Darfur, Sudan
…More articles here
Location of South Sudan

A map showing the location of South Sudan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on South Sudan, see the South Sudan Portal
Flag of South Sudan.svg

Sunday, July 10, 2011

At 0000 EAT Saturday (2100 UTC Friday), the Republic of South Sudan achieved independent recognition, becoming the newest country on the planet. The parliament speaker for the new country recited a formal independence declaration. After independence was declared, the South Sudanese flag was lifted for all to see, with Sudan People’s Liberation Army/Movement secretary general Pagan Amum stating: “Today we shall raise the flag of South Sudan to join the nations of the world”.

Cquote1.svg Today we shall raise the flag of South Sudan to join the nations of the world Cquote2.svg

Pagan Amum, Sudan People’s Liberation Army/Movement secretary general

Thousands of jubilant people celebrated in the new country’s capital Juba. They danced in the streets, sang songs and waved flags. Churches rang their bells at midnight as independence arrived. People crowded to the official ceremonial site, held at the mausoleum of John Garang, leader of the rebellion who died several months after the peace deal was signed with Sudan, ending the bloody conflict. Many of the celebrants spoke emotionally of their family members who died in the long struggle with Sudan.

George Garang, an English teacher, said he lost his father, grandfather and eleven brothers. “My whole body feels happy,” he said. Valentino Achak Deng, who was a refugee during the war, said: “Really in my heart what makes me happiest is that from today, when people ask me where I am from, I do not have to say Sudan.”

Salva Kiir Mayardit has assumed the role as president of South Sudan. Kiir swore to pledge true alliance and faithfulness to South Sudan. In a speech, Kiir declared amnesty for any who have taken up arms against Sudan.

Kiir insisted that martyrs for the cause of the new country did not die in vain, although South Sudan waited 56 years to be free. The southern Sudanese had agitated for more rights, even before Sudan became free from its British colonizers in 1956. Sudan was divided into three separate demographic groups, with the southern part of the country home to Christians and animists and the northern part dominated by Arab populations and those of Muslim faith. Kiir said to people of Abyei, Darfur, Blue Nile and South Kordofan, who remain part of Sudan, that “we have not forgotten you. When you cry, we cry. When you bleed, we bleed. I pledge to you today that we will find a just peace for all.”

Amongst those attending the event were Ban Ki-moon, the current Secretary-General of the United Nations and Omar al-Bashir, the current president of Sudan. The latter was the guest of honour, despite the fact that the International Criminal Court has a warrant out for his arrest based on offences of genocide and crimes against humanity in the Darfur region.

“We congratulate our brothers in the south for the establishment of their new state,” al-Bashir said at the event. “We share their joy and celebration. The will of the people of the south has to be respected.”

Two million individuals died in the civil war between the two territories of Sudan and Southern Sudan and four million more exiled, a war that was waged for decades. Control of south Sudan’s oil rich reserves was the primary reason for the fighting. An agreement of peace was signed in 2005, effectively bringing the war to an end, and Sudan became one of the first countries to recognise South Sudan. Under the regulations of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, Sudan held an independence referendum. In excess of 99% of those participating in the vote agreed to the concept of independence for South Sudan.

Meanwhile, the United Nations plans to make the independent state its 193rd recognised country and its 54th African U.N. member state. United States president Barack Obama formerly recognized the new nation on behalf of the US and acknowledged the enormous struggle of its people to achieve independence.

South Sudan remains a desperately poor country, with one in five of its inhabitants chronically hungry, only one third having access to safe drinking water and with the world’s highest rate of maternal death. The country lacks infrastructure such as roads and railways. It remains torn by ethnic and tribal rivalries and many problems with the north remain unresolved, including the exact boundary line. Important revenue for Sudan has come from the rich oilfields of the south, keeping the country afloat and essential now for both economies. A formula remains to be developed on how to split these revenues between the two areas.

U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice said today that the peace process between Sudan and North Sudan could come apart if issues such as the division of the oil revenues and the border location are not solved soon.

Flag of South Sudan. Image: Public domain.

Flag of South Sudan.
Image: Public domain.

The location of South Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map. Image: Spesh531.

The location of South Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map.
Image: Spesh531.

File photo of Salva Kiir Mayardit, the president of South Sudan. Image: Jenny Rockett.

File photo of Salva Kiir Mayardit, the president of South Sudan.
Image: Jenny Rockett.

Flag of Sudan. Image: Public domain.

Flag of Sudan.
Image: Public domain.

The location of Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map. Image: Dinamik.

The location of Sudan is highlighted in dark green on this map.
Image: Dinamik.

Sudan president Omar al-Bashir, seen here in January 2009, attended the independence ceremony. Image: U.S. Navy / Jesse B. Awalt.

Sudan president Omar al-Bashir, seen here in January 2009, attended the independence ceremony.
Image: U.S. Navy / Jesse B. Awalt.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, seen here in September 2010, was amongst those present in South Sudan upon the state's declaration of independence. Image: Gobierno de Chile.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, seen here in September 2010, was amongst those present in South Sudan upon the state’s declaration of independence.
Image: Gobierno de Chile.



Related news

Sources

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
South Sudan
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 10, 2011

South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed

Filed under: Africa,Archived,Crime and law,Juba,South Sudan,Sudan — admin @ 5:00 am

South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed – Wikinews, the free news source

South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Sudan
Other stories from Sudan
…More articles here
Location of Sudan

A map showing the location of Sudan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Sudan, see the Sudan Portal
Flag of Sudan.svg

Thursday, February 10, 2011

South Sudan’s Cooperatives and Rural Development Minister, Jimmy Lemi Milla, was shot and killed yesterday at his office in Juba, South Sudan. Officials said they believed the shooting was not politically motivated.

Cquote1.svg This is such a shock to the people here, coming so soon after our peaceful referendum. Cquote2.svg

—Richard Lukodu

According to witnesses, after the minister and his bodyguard had entered the ministry building, the shooter broke into the minister’s car and took from it the bodyguard’s pistol, entered the building, and shot and killed first the minister, then the bodyguard. He was subdued and taken into custody. According to officials, the shooter, who may have been the minister’s brother-in-law, had been employed by Milla and wanted to be paid.

Civil servant Richard Lukodu said, “This is such a shock to the people here, coming so soon after our peaceful referendum… This is the result of one angry man — and people should not think that this is reflective of all of south Sudan.”

South Sudan held a referendum last month on secession from Sudan. Following decades of civil war officially ending in 2005, violence in the south has been a continuing problem, but lessened leading up to the referendum. The result of the referendum was overwhelmingly for secession, and the President of Sudan has stated acceptance of that result.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 10, 2010

US warns of attacks on Sudan-Uganda flights

US warns of attacks on Sudan-Uganda flights

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Aviation

Air Force One over Mt. Rushmore.jpg
Related articles
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

The United States has said that “regional extremists” may be targeting Air Uganda airplane flights between Southern Sudan and Uganda.

A warning posted yesterday on the Web site of the US Embassy in Khartoum says there is a “potential threat” on the flights between Juba, Sudan and Kampala, Uganda. Juba is the capital of semi-autonomous Southern Sudan.

The embassy did not name the potential attackers but said the threat is of “sufficient seriousness,” and that air travelers should “maintain vigilance at all times.”

“[We have] received information indicating a desire by regional extremists to conduct a deadly attack on board Air Uganda aircraft,” the embassy said in a statement. “[The] capacity of these extremists to carry out such an attack is unknown […] [but] of sufficient seriousness that all American air travellers should be made aware.”

The Sudanese Foreign Ministry, however, commented that the threat wasn’t “serious”. Foreign Ministry spokesman Moawiya Osman Khalid commented that “they did not inform us of this security threat, we learnt about it from the embassy’s website,” as quoted by Agence France-Presse. “They did not ask for our cooperation, which they should have done before notifying the media.”

The US has increased its airport security following the failed attempted December 25 bombing of a Delta flight by a Nigerian man with explosives in his underpants. Sudan is one of fourteen countries where passengers headed for the US will undergo additional searches at airport security.



Related News

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 29, 2008

Cargo plane crash in Sudan leaves seven dead with one survivor

Cargo plane crash in Sudan leaves seven dead with one survivor

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, June 29, 2008

A file photo of a Russian An-12 in commercial use

An Antonov An-12 has crashed North of Upper Nile State capital Malakal, Sudan. Seven crewmembers were killed but an eighth escaped injury.

The aircraft, owned and operated by Juba Air Cargo, had departed Khartoum International Airport at 5:55 am (0255 GMT) and was an hour and ten minutes into its flight towards Juba Airport. Juba is the capital of Southern Sudan.

Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) spokesman Abdel Hafiz spoke with AFP, and told them “One person survived out of eight. His name is Mohamed Hamza, a Sudanese. Two Sudanese were among the dead (as were) four from Ukraine and one from Armenia,” he said, adding “A thunderstorm hit the plane, as the survivor said, one of the crew. This apparently is the cause. The survivor is not injured but was taken to hospital (as a precaution).”

Those killed were removed from the wreckage and flown back to a Khartoum morgue.

The Sudan Media Centre (SMC), which is thought to be tied to the intelligence services, said the aircraft had returned to Sudan recently after major maintenance work in the United Arab Emirates. The SMC also agreed with he nationalities of the deceased, adding that one of the Sudanese was the pilot-in-command.

It said the surviving air operations officer had said the plane was struck twice by lightning. It also said the plane had been talking to Air Traffic Control in Khartoum at the time to request permission to reduce altitude to avoid the worst of the storm.

Major General Abdubaker Jafar, manager of the CAA, was quoted by the SMC as praising the quick emergency response, which was conducted with three helicopters owned by local companies.


Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 2, 2008

Southern Sudan\’s defence minister among those killed in major plane crash

Southern Sudan’s defence minister among those killed in major plane crash

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, May 2, 2008

Sudan
Other stories from Sudan
…More articles here
Location of Sudan

A map showing the location of Sudan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Sudan, see the Sudan Portal
Flag of Sudan.svg

A Southern Sudan Air Connection aircraft has crashed today in Southern Sudan, killing over a dozen people, including the area’s defence minister.

Location map of Africa, Southern Sudan highlighted
Image: Vardion, Mandavi.

This Air Labrador 1900 is comparable to the aircraft involved.

There are conflicting reports on how many people were on board and how many died in the Bahr Gazal crash, but at least twenty people were on board. Some sources suggest nineteen fatalities and two survivors, and others say there were 26 deaths and no survivors; it should be noted that if either of these were correct then there were more than twenty on board. Lieutenant General Dominic Dim Deng, the area’s defence minister, is confirmed to be dead and it is thought at least 19 military officials are now deceased.

“The plane had been rented from a charter company and was carrying a delegation of leaders from the (former rebel) Sudan People’s Liberation Movement from Wau to the capital Juba,” said Luka Mariak, spokesman for the Souther Sudan president Salva Kiir. This makes the journey around 450 kilometres (290 miles), with the plane crashing in a flat region 375 kilometres (around 220 miles) from Juba. It is reported it subsequently caught fire.

The United Nations said that the United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) had dispatched a helicopter to assist the emergency response effort. The UN also said that the aircraft was a Beechcraft 1900 and that they would fly in government officials and aviation experts to conduct an investigation. The site has been cordoned off.

Ashraf Jehangir Qazi, UNMIS’s Secretary-General’s Special Representative, offered his condolences to the government on behalf of both UNMIS and th UN as a whole.

Kiir said in a press conference “Twenty-one passengers were killed and either two or three crew members. Two engines failed and there was nothing the pilot could do.”

Justin Yak and his wife are also confirmed to be dead. Yak was the minister for cabinet affairs until a 2007 reshuffle left him removed from office. He was an adviser to the president at the time of his death. Bodies were flown into Juba Airport were relatives waited for hours for news. UNMIS is expected to fly the bodies on to their nearby airfield, to which there is no public access.

The disaster is thought to be an accident caused by mechanical trouble. The pilot had contacted Air Traffic Control (ATC) to report engine problems and requested permission to conduct an emergency landing at nearby Rumbek. ATC lost contact minutes later.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 24, 2008

Ugandan government, rebels agree to ceasefire

Ugandan government, rebels agree to ceasefire

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, February 24, 2008

File:Joseph Kony (296444792).jpg
Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army.
Image: joram jojo.

On Saturday, the Ugandan government signed a permanent ceasefire with the Lord’s Resistance Army, a self-proclaimed Christian guerilla army which has been rebelling against the government in one of Africa’s longest running conflicts.

The ceasefire will not take effect until the day after both sides sign a comprehensive peace deal, which is expected to be completed later this week. Rebels and government officials hailed the event as a step towards the end of the two-decade long war.

“Today this is a landmark toward peace in our country,” said David Matsanga, one of the rebels involved in the negotiations. “Our people have yearned for that peace for the past 22 years.” Chris Magezi, spokesman for the government delegation, called the agreement “another major breakthrough”.

The signing was presided over by Riek Machar, vice president of southern Sudan. It was the latest development in the ongoing peace talks being held in Juba since July 2006. In August 2006, the two sides agreed to a cessation of hostilities.

According to the terms of the deal, the Lord’s Resistance Army will be prohibited from recruiting or rearming soldiers, and they will not be able to travel beyond a temporary assembly area in southern Sudan. The assembly area will be guarded by Sudanese troops.

The only item remaining on the agenda for negotiators is the demobilization of the rebels and their integration into the Ugandan army, an issue which is expected to be dealt with quickly. However, United Nations envoy Joaquim Chissano warned, “Let us not be obfuscated by this joy. We must see clearly a way to complete peace.”

The Lord’s Resistance Army is a group which aims to establish a theocratic government in Uganda. In 1986, they revolted against the government and began a conflict which has killed tens of thousands of people and displaced over 2 million. The group is also accused of human rights violations, including mutilating their victims and recruiting children as soldiers.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 29, 2006

Ugandan ceasefire takes effect

Ugandan ceasefire takes effect – Wikinews, the free news source

Ugandan ceasefire takes effect

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, August 29, 2006

Ugandan districts affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army

A twenty year war between the Ugandan government and the rebel Lord’s Resistance Army entered a new stage today as both sides initiated a ceasefire agreement.

At 0600 hours local time (0300 GMT) government soldiers returned to their barracks and rebel guns fell silent after a peace deal was signed on Saturday.

Under the deal, rebel forces, under leader Joseph Kony, will have 3 weeks to assemble at select locations in southern Sudan where they will escorted in safety by regional government troops. Kony and the LRA leadership are reportedly on the Chad–Democratic Republic of the Congo border and are planning on flying to the assembly locations.

Kony’s second in command, General Otti appeared on radio in Gulu on Sunday night to address his troops declaring the ceasefire and ordering them to lay down their weapons.

For their part, the Ugandan government has promised to respect the ceasefire and not attack the rebel troops as they assemble.

An army spokesperson, Major Felix Kulaije, announced today that “The cessation of hostilities is in effect now and involves the Ugandan army halting their search-and-destroy operations.”

State Minister for Defence Ruth Nankabirwa told journalists “we are now in a period of silence… I pray that none of the sides violate the cessation of hostilities agreement.”

Once rebel troops have been gathered under the protective wing of the Ugandan Peoples’ Defence Force, extensive peace talks are due to begin. Key issues to be discussed will likely be the return of thousands of children kidnapped by the Lord’s Resistance Army for use as child soldiers, and Kony’s status as a wanted war criminal. The Ugandan government surprised many outsiders by promising to protect the LRA leader in return for negotiations despite being wanted by the International Criminal Court.

A modest wooden hotel in Juba was the scene of this weekend’s landmark talks which secured the ceasefire to end two decades of conflict. The Ugandan government has been fighting the Lord’s Resistance Army since the 1980s, in a war that has caught up over 20,000 children, many becoming child soldiers or sex slaves for the LRA.

With Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni warning that hostilities would begin again if talks collapsed, the international community will be following the upcoming talks very closely.

Related news

  • “Ugandan rebels agree to a ceasefire” — Wikinews, August 5, 2006

Sources

  • Emmanuel Gyezaho. “Guns fall silent” — Daily Monitor, Uganda, August 29, 2006
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress