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April 9, 2016

Thousands march in London calling for David Cameron\’s resignation over tax affairs

Thousands march in London calling for David Cameron’s resignation over tax affairs

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Saturday, April 9, 2016

Thousands of demonstrators marched in London today over the tax affairs of Prime Minister David Cameron which were revealed as part of the leak of the Panama Papers.

The protest started around 11:00 local time (UTC+1) on Whitehall opposite the police-guarded entrance to Downing Street, the Prime Minister’s official residence. Just after 11:00, protesters blocked traffic on the northbound carriage in Whitehall. At 11:20, the police asked the protesters to move back on to the pavement, stating that they needed to balance the right to protest with the traffic building up. Around 11:29, the protest moved up Whitehall, past Trafalgar Square, along the Strand, passing by Aldwych and up Kingsway towards Holborn where the Conservative Party were holding their Spring Forum in the Grand Connaught Rooms hotel.

The protest was organised after it was revealed that David Cameron has profited from offshore investments held by his father, Ian, that were organised in part by Mossack Fonseca, the Panama-based law firm whose communications were recently published.

Anti-David Cameron protest 05.jpg

Protesters outside Downing Street holding signs.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 03.jpg

Protestors shouting outside Downing Street.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 02.jpg

Demonstrators getting ready just before 11:00.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 01.jpg

Demonstrators getting ready just before 11:00.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 04.jpg

Demonstrators rallying outside the gates to Downing Street.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 07.jpg

Protesters holding placards, flags and a pig-shaped piñata outside Downing Street.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 08.jpg

After leaving Whitehall, the protesters moved up Whitehall towards Trafalgar Square.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 09.jpg

Protesters crossing Trafalgar Square towards The Strand.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 10.jpg

Protesters marching down the Strand.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 11.jpg

A protester holding a pig-shaped piñata at the bottom of Kingsway.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 06.jpg

Police officers discussing the protest outside Downing Street.
Image: Tom Morris.

Anti-David Cameron protest 12.jpg

The protest caused some disruption for traffic. After the marchers had passed the Strand, many delayed buses filled the eastbound road.
Image: Tom Morris.



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February 21, 2016

Curfew in Haryana as protesters demand reservation for Jat Quota

Curfew in Haryana as protesters demand reservation for Jat quota

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Sunday, February 21, 2016

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A growing number of cities in the Indian state Haryana have been under curfew since Friday. At least eight people are reported dead, with government offices, property, dozens of buses, and eight railway stations burned after protests over job quotas for the Jat caste turned violent in several cities including Rohtak, Bhiwani, and Jhajjar. Reportedly some protesters broke into an armory in Rohtak, stealing arms and ammunition.

Cquote1.svg I appeal to all my fellow Haryanvis to maintain law & order in the State, and ensure that harmony is maintained in society. Cquote2.svg

Manohar Lal Khattar, Hyrana CM

Shoot-at-sight was ordered for Rohtak, Bhiwani, Sonipat, Panipat, Jhajjar, Jind and Hisar. Shops, hotels, and restaurants were set afire by protesters. Thirteen national army columns were called, and helicopters were used to reach various places in the state. Internet was disabled in affected districts, and the state government ordered blocks of all social networking websites.

Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar held a meeting to decide if Jats should also gain the reservation rights for government jobs and colleges by classifying them under Other Backwards Castes.

Burning of stations and uprooting of tracks affected 810 scheduled trains, according to The Indian Express. Police said protesters torched Finance Minister Captain Abhimanyu’s house. The state might face water crises. Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) was to hold the Haryana Central Teacher Eligibility Test today, but cited “administrative difficulties” for suspending it.

Back in 2014, the UPA government appealed for a Jat quota which was rejected by the Supreme Court. This morning, Manohar Khattar tweeted “I appeal to all my fellow Haryanvis to maintain law & order in the State, and ensure that harmony is maintained in society.”

Last year, similar protest took place in Gujarat as Patels protested for reservation led by Hardik Patel.


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October 26, 2015

South African president to meet parliament-storming protesters

South African president to meet parliament-storming protesters

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Monday, October 26, 2015

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The president of South Africa, Jacob Zuma, announced on Thursday morning he will meet protesters who stormed the parliament. The president meeted the protesters last friday, while at the outside of the building the police fired teargas against the protsters. After the talks the president announced in a press-conference, that the fees will not be hiked in the next year.

The protests began on last Monday. Students are angered by raised tuition fees. The protests continued on Wednesday while students from Capetown University marched from the campus to the parliament. At the parliament, they stormed the grounds and sat down in front of the building, preventing members of Parliament from leaving. The hashtag #FeesMustFall has been trending nationally and is being used by the student protestors to communicate.

Fees were initially hiked 10%. Later, this percentage was decreased to 6%.

According to the protesters, police used teargas against them. “The protest was peaceful but we were met with violence from the police,” said Aziz Matthews, 23, a senior at the university. In a statement of the South African Police Service, a spokesman said: “The behavior of those students is unacceptable and should not be condoned in any way”

Because of the protests, lots of universities all over the country were shut down.



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South African president announces no fee hikes

South African president announces no fee hikes

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Monday, October 26, 2015

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President Zuma in 2014.
Image: U.S. Department of State.

The president of South Africa, Jacob Zuma, announced on Thursday morning he would meet protesters who stormed the parliament. The president met the protesters last friday, while at the outside of the building the police fired teargas against the protsters. After the talks the president announced in a press-conference, that the fees will not be hiked in the next year.

The protests began on last Monday. Students are angered by raised tuition fees. The protests continued on Wednesday while students from Capetown University marched from the campus to the parliament. At the parliament, they stormed the grounds and sat down in front of the building, preventing members of Parliament from leaving. The hashtag #FeesMustFall has been trending nationally and is being used by the student protestors to communicate.

Fees were initially hiked 10%. Later, this percentage was decreased to 6%.

According to the protesters, police used teargas against them. “The protest was peaceful but we were met with violence from the police,” said Aziz Matthews, 23, a senior at the university. In a statement of the South African Police Service, a spokesman said: “The behavior of those students is unacceptable and should not be condoned in any way”

Because of the protests, lots of universities all over the country were shut down.



Sources[]

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 28, 2015

Gujarat quota protests turn violent

Gujarat quota protests turn violent – Wikinews, the free news source

Gujarat quota protests turn violent

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Friday, August 28, 2015

Parts of the Indian state of Gujarat have been under curfew since Tuesday. At least seven are reported dead, with over 100 buses and dozens of police stations burned, after protests over job quotas turned violent in several major cities including Ahmedabad, Surat, and Rajkot.

Cquote1.svg Each and every issue can be resolved through talks Cquote2.svg

—Narendra Modi

The violence is thought to have started after a brief attempt by police to arrest protest leader Hardik Patel, 22 or 21. There have been weeks of protests by members of the Patel caste, with the most recent involving an estimated half a million people.

Ahmedabad, the largest city in the state, has seen the closure of public transport, internet access, schools, and businesses. Ahmedabad is being patrolled by 400 military personnel. The national government has deployed several thousand paramilitary personnel to assist the state government.

The Patel caste, who form up to a fifth of the state population, are generally seen as being affluent businesspeople. However, they want their community to be given the status of Other Backward Class, which would result in eligibility for reserved jobs. They feel they are under-represented in higher education and are suffering in a regional economic downturn.

Amongst those calling for an end to the violence was Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who said “each and every issue can be resolved through talks” during a televised broadcast. He was elected last year and was previously the Chief Minister of Gujarat for more than twelve years. He was in power in Gujurat during sectarian violence in 2002 which resulted in about a thousand deaths.



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  • “BJP’s Narendra Modi elected new prime minister of India” — Wikinews, May 17, 2014

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August 20, 2015

Protesters in England call for change to cricket governance

Protesters in England call for change to cricket governance

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Thursday, August 20, 2015

A protest was held ahead of the start of the fifth Ashes cricket test today, seeking a higher standard of cricket administration.

Around 100 protesters, which included writer Gideon Haigh, Wisden editor Lawrence Booth, and Damian Collins, MP for Folkestone and Hythe, gathered outside the Oval cricket ground to observe three minutes of silence, a minute for each of the “Big Three” nations — India, England, and Australia. Organisers claim these nations of controlling cricket’s governance to benefit themselves.

Sam Collins and Jarrod Kimber, a pair of journalists and film-makers, organised the protest.

“Now the Ashes have been decided, we feel the time is right to protest at the powerlessness of all other countries in the cricket world,” Collins told The Telegraph. “Nobody has any power except for Narayan Srinivasan, of India, Giles Clarke, of England, and Wally Edwards, of Australia.”

Collins and Kimber recently released the film Death of a Gentleman. The documentary was created by the pair to examine what the future holds for test match cricket whilst examining claims of corrupt administrators. The film-makers have launched changecricket.com, calling on cricket fans to advocate for better governance of the sport. “We ask fans of all nations to stand with us and show their dissatisfaction about the way their game is being run,” said Collins.



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August 17, 2015

Woman fined in Spain under new \’Gag law\’

Woman fined in Spain under new ‘Gag Law’

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Monday, August 17, 2015

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The posted photo of a police vehicle parked in handicapped bay in Petrer, Spain; license number removed.
Image: Facebook.

A woman in Spain has been fined 800 after posting a photograph to her Facebook account of a police vehicle parked in space reserved for disabled/handicapped drivers. She was located and fined within two days of posting the photograph. The incident has now gained international attention.

The woman, who has not been named, saw the police vehicle parked in a reserved spot in Petrer and snapped a photo. She posted the photo with the caption: “Park where you bloody well please and you won’t even be fined.”((es))

Fernando Portillo, a local police spokesperson, told local media the vehicle was parked there because police were responding to an emergency. After the story was reported on a local news website, it began to be reported internationally.

On July 1, the “Citizens’ Security law” went into effect. The law was written in response to violent protests. Even before its enactment it saw widespread criticism. It was dubbed the “gag law”((es)) or the “gagging law”. The law prohibits “the unauthorized use of images of police officers that might jeopardize their or their family’s safety or that of protected facilities or police operations”((es)).

Judge Joaquim Bosch, Judges for Democracy spokesperson, said: “It is not a law for citizens’ security, but a law for the government to avoid citizens’ protests. All opinion polls indicate that the Spanish society is not at all preoccupied by security but by the economic situation and political corruption.”

Amnesty International condemned the law in a report: “With threats of fines or threats of being beaten, the government is trying to stigmatize and criminalize people who are just practicing their rights.” Virginia Álvarez, who wrote the report, noted, “instead of listening to their demands, instead of starting a dialogue, authorities are doing everything they can to impede people from protesting”.

The part of the law which prohibits “the unauthorized use of images of police officers that might jeopardize their or their family’s safety” is cited as the reason for the fine, however, police spokesperson Fernando Portillo said it was up to police officers involved and under the new law they could do this. “We would have preferred a different solution but they have the legal right to impose the fine,” Portillo said, but the public posting of the photo impugned the officers’ sense of honor.



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January 24, 2015

UN Security Council heads to Haiti amid political instability

UN Security Council heads to Haiti amid political instability

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Saturday, January 24, 2015

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Representatives of the United Nations Security Council’s (UNSC) fifteen member states flew to Haiti yesterday. The nation is moving to hold new elections with President Michel Martelly presently ruling by decree.

President Martelly, seen here in 2012, is ruling by decree after the collapse of parliament.
Image: World Economic Forum.

Martelly swore in a new Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) of nine members yesterday. It is Martelly’s fifth CEP in four years. Last month a presidential commission recommended the prior CEP’s resignation as part of a package of measures to move the country towards new elections. The commission was Martelly’s response to widespread anti-regime protests that started in October. The sometimes-violent protests were triggered by failure to hold elections, some due since 2011.

On January 12 the Senate was reduced to a defunct ten members, with sixteen required for a quorum. Amendments to electoral law were required by the Senate before elections due in 2011 could be held. Rival political factions were unable to resolve disagreements. The lower level of parliament, the Chamber of Deputies, also saw all 99 seats vacated.

Also due are municipal elections, with 4,000 local posts needing refilled. A presidential election is due this year and the constitution forbids a consecutive term for Martelly. CEP members were sworn in yesterday at the Supreme Court; the presidential commission also recommended a new head for the court.

This month Martelly installed a new cabinet including opposition members, amongst them appointing Evans Paul as Prime Minister. Paul replaces Laurent Lamothe who resigned last month at the request of Martelly’s commission. Paul was yesterday joined by foreign diplomats to welcome the new CEP in Petionville, the CEP headquarters.

Protests continued around the nation yesterday, with anger directed at foreign leaders who have supported Martelly as well as the local regime. Brazil, Canada, France, Spain, the United States, the European Union, and the Organization of American States expressed in a joint statement “support to the president of the republic in the exercise of his constitutional duty to ensure the regular functioning of institutions and the continuity of the state” as parliament’s terms lapsed and power passed to Martelly alone.

The UN is unpopular in Haiti where many blame their peacekeeping force for a 2010 cholera outbreak, which is ongoing with 9,000 deaths. The UN has extended the peacekeeping mission for another year but does plan to reduce troops from around 5,000 to around 2,400. Anti-peacekeeper protests have also focussed on sexual abuse allegations.



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January 12, 2015

Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo

Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo

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Monday, January 12, 2015

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Marchers in Paris.
Image: Yann Caradec.

Following the shootings at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, millions of people turned out yesterday for marches in Paris, in cities across France, and around the world. Reported estimates of between 1.5 and 2 million people rallied in Paris, and the French interior ministry estimated 3.7 million or more rallied across France.

44 world leaders attended the Paris march including French President François Hollande; German Chancellor Angela Merkel; British Prime Minister David Cameron; Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy; Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi; the President of Mali, Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta; Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu; Mahmoud Abbas, President of the Palestinian Authority; King Abdullah II and Queen Rania of Jordan; Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu; the Russian Foreign Minister, Sergey Lavrov; the Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban; and the President of Gabon, Ali Bongo Ondimba.

US Ambassador to France Jane D. Hartley attended. White House Spokesman Josh Earnest responded to criticism for not sending a higher level representative on behalf of the United States: “It is fair to say we should have sent someone with a higher profile.” Earnest said the rally had been planned on Friday and President Obama attending the rally on such short notice presented “significant security challenges”. Secretary of State John Kerry said he already had a prior engagement in India.

Charlie Hebdo has previously published cartoons featuring the Islamic prophet Muhammed. These include original depictions and reprints of controversial cartoons originally by Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten. Some of these cartoons were on display at the marches.

Marche Charlie Hebdo Paris 07.jpg

Paris: flowers and tributes to the victims of the shooting.
Image: Guerric Poncet.

6 Marche républicaine 11 janvier 2015 Paris - Le crayon comme pancarte AB P1340202.jpg

Paris march: a protester holding up two colouring pencils, in solidarity with journalists and cartoonists killed in the attack.
Image: Basili.

Crayons libres 2.jpg

Paris march: protestors holding up two giant pencils.
Image: Eric Walter.

Les crayons.jpg

Paris march: more protestors holding up giant pencils.
Image: Eric Walter.

Foule en défilé.jpg

Paris march: marchers fill the street.
Image: Eric Walter.

Marche du 11 Janvier 2015, Paris (4).jpg

Paris march: more marchers filling the streets.
Image: Yann Caradec.

Pancarte 2.jpg

Paris march.
Image: Eric Walter.

Paris Rally, 11 January 2015 - Boulevard Beaumarchais - 05.jpg

Paris march: marchers moving up Boulevard Beaumarchais.
Image: Poulpy.

2 Marche républicaine 11 janvier 2015 Paris - Foule des manifestants quai station Mirosmenil AB P1340193.jpg

Paris march: marchers fill the platform at the Miromesnil Métro station.
Image: Basili.

Rassemblement de soutien à Charlie Hebdo - 11 janvier 2015 - Bordeaux 10.JPG

Bordeaux rally.
Image: LeJC.

Bourg-en-Bresse rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting, 11 January 2015 (2).JPG

Rally in Bourg-en-Bresse.
Image: Benoît Prieur.

Marche républicaine 2015, Chambéry 9.JPG

Rally in Chambéry.
Image: Florian Pépellin.

Marche républicaine du 11 janvier 2015 à Lyon 49.JPG

Rally in Lyon.
Image: Jitrixis.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-1.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-11.jpg

A sign at the march in Rennes showing a number of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-7.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Rennes 11 janvier 2015 - Marche républicaine 03.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Pymouss.

Dimanche 11 janv 2015 Reims soutien à Charlie 05969.JPG

Rally at the Place Royale in Reims.
Image: G.Garitan.

French flag projected onto The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London.JPG

French flag projected on to the side of the National Gallery in London as a sign of solidarity.
Image: Simeon87.

Tributes to the victims.jpg

Signs, pens, sketch pads and cartoons left as a memorial in Trafalgar Square in London.
Image: Zefrog.

Participant holding a pen.jpg

A pen held up as part of the rally in London’s Trafalgar Square.
Image: Zefrog.

Je suis Charlie rally at Daley Plaza in Chicago, 11 January 2015 (5).jpg

A man holding both a French and American flag at a rally in Daley Plaza in Chicago.
Image: Stel Cape.

Cologne rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting-191954.jpg

A small rally in Cologne.
Image: Raimond Spekking.

JeSuisCharlie in Moscow S0147494 (16255052582).jpg

Candle lights at a rally in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

JeSuisCharlie in Moscow S0177502 (16070064457).jpg

Snow-covered flowers and tributes outside the office of the French Ambassador in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

JeSuisCharlie in Moscow S0357555 (16068596810).jpg

At the rally in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

Je suis Charlie, Stockholm 11 January 2015 (2).jpg

Rally in Stockholm.
Image: Henrik M F.

Stockholm rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting (15).jpg

Rally in Stockholm.
Image: fcruse.

Stockholm rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting (9).jpg

A pencil in the snow at the Stockholm rally.
Image: fcruse.

Wien - Gedenkkundgebung Gemeinsam gegen den Terror - Je Suis Charlie - I.jpg

Rally in Vienna.
Image: Haeferl.

Je suis Charlie, Berlin 11 January 2015 (2).jpg

Rally in Berlin.
Image: Tim.

Je suis Charlie, Brussels 11 January 2015 (122).jpg

Rally in Brussels.
Image: Miguel Discart.



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  • “Twelve dead in shooting at offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo” — Wikinews, January 7, 2015

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December 15, 2014

Laurent Lamothe resigns as Haitian PM

Laurent Lamothe resigns as Haitian PM – Wikinews, the free news source

Laurent Lamothe resigns as Haitian PM

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Monday, December 15, 2014

Haiti
Other stories from Haiti
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Location of Haiti

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Laurent Lamothe during a foreign visit earlier this year.
Image: U.S. Department of State.

Laurent Lamothe on Saturday announced his resignation as Prime Minister of Haiti amid political paralysis and anti-regime protests.

Lamothe’s resignation had been recommended on Friday by a commission set up by President Michel Martelly. Martelly appointed Lamothe in 2011, the year after a major earthquake caused widespread devastation. Elections to the Senate, Lower Chamber, and numerous municipal offices were also due in 2011.

The Senate must approve amended electoral law before the votes can occur. At least sixteen of the thirty Senate members must attend to make a quorum. Only twenty places are presently filled, and six opposition members are refusing to attend.

The opposition accuses the government of unfairly favouring themselves with the amendments. In response the government claims opposition politicians wish to delay the votes to retain their seats. Hundreds of municipal seats, all of the Lower House, and most of the Senate all require elected. If votes are not in by January 12 the Senate will be reduced to a defunct ten members.

Lamothe told TV audiences “I am leaving the post of prime minister this evening with a feeling of accomplishment. Vive Haiti.” The nation remains one of the poorest in the world but last year foreign investment was worth US$186 million (£118 million; 149 million), a 20% increase. He also says 84% of children are in education now, compared to 52% when he was appointed.

His social media savvy and multiple languages helped him develop a high profile at home and abroad. He also attempted to simplify business startups, and campaigned with tourism minister Stephanie Villedrouin to improve Haiti’s image abroad. He was Martelly’s third choice for Prime Minister, with Parliament rejecting his first two appointments. Lamothe’s three-year term witnessed three cabinet reshuffles.

Protests over missed elections began in October, with citizens taking to the streets to demand Martelly and Lamothe both resign. The sometimes violent protests have not abated despite Martelly forming the eleven-strong commission late last month to try and reach a resolution.

Martelly has already indicated he accepts the commission’s findings. Also recommended are resignations by the electoral commission and the head of the Supreme Court.



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