Wiki Actu en

July 7, 2012

WorldPride London 2012: In pictures

WorldPride London 2012: In pictures – Wikinews, the free news source

WorldPride London 2012: In pictures

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, July 7, 2012

Radical ‘Queer Resistance’ marchers brought a political edge to Pride.
Image: Tom Morris.

Despite allegations that the Mayor of London‘s office exerted pressure on the organisers of WorldPride in London to change the start time of the event to reduce the number of people attending, thousands of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people and their supporters marched from Portman Square to Whitehall today. The event celebrated forty years since the first gay pride march in London in 1972.

Veterans of the 1972 march led the parade, and were followed by groups representing LGBT charity and campaigning groups including Stonewall and Terrence Higgins Trust, trade unions, student groups and corporations including Tesco, Google, Microsoft, IBM, Ernst and Young, Smirnoff, and KPMG.


WorldPride 2012 - 015.jpg Walking groups gathering together in Portman Square before the march started.
Image: Tom Morris.

London Gay Pride 2012 Brian Paddick.jpg Brian Paddick, former Deputy Assistant Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police and candidate for London mayor, marching with other elected Liberal Democrats.
Image: Fæ.

WorldPride 2012 - 011.jpg Marchers with Stonewall with placards reading “Some people are gay. Get over it.”
Image: Tom Morris.
WorldPride 2012 - 114.jpg Workers from Tesco marching in the parade.
Image: Tom Morris.
WorldPride 2012 - 138.jpg Members of the gay swimming group Out To Swim.
Image: Tom Morris.
WorldPride 2012 - 143.jpg LGBT students from Middlesex University.
Image: Tom Morris.
WorldPride 2012 - 146.jpg London Raiders, a gay and lesbian softball team.
Image: Tom Morris.
WorldPride 2012 - 156.jpg A drag queen hands out condoms followed by a group of men in lederhosen.
Image: Tom Morris.
WorldPride 2012 - 167.jpg Transgender campaigners marching down Oxford Street.
Image: Tom Morris.
WorldPride 2012 - 168.jpg Leathermen marching down Oxford Street.
Image: Tom Morris.
London Gay Pride 2012 London gothic.jpg Members of London’s gothic community joined the parade.
Image: Fæ.
WorldPride 2012 - 182.jpg A small group of anti-gay Christians protested in Haymarket.
Image: Tom Morris.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 5, 2010

UK Parliament to vote on tuition fee rise on Thursday

UK Parliament to vote on tuition fee rise on Thursday

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, December 5, 2010

Students protesting outside the UK parliament in November.
Image: BillyH.

The controversial plan to raise university tuition fees in England and Wales will be voted on in the House of Commons on Thursday, December 9. The policy has been the cause of protests across the United Kingdom by students, some of which have turned violent. It has also been a source of considerable criticism and political difficulties for the Liberal Democrats and has raised questions as to the long-term viability of the Coalition government.

The new policy on tuition fees will allow universities to double the current tuition fees from £3,290 per year to around £6,000 per year, as well as allowing some universities to get special approval from the Office For Fair Access (OFFA) to raise their fees to £9,000 per year. If passed, the new fee structure will apply starting in the academic year of 2012/2013. The vote on Thursday will only be on the fee rise, with other matters being voted on in the new year following publication of a new higher education white paper.

Vince Cable and Nick Clegg will likely vote for the changes, but how many Lib Dems will join them?
Image: Nick Clegg.

In addition to increasing fees, the policy will increase the payment threshold at which payment is made. It is currently set at £15,000 and will rise to £21,000, but the interest rate will also rise. It is currently 1.5% but will now vary from between 0% and 3% plus inflation (using the Retail Price Index).

The fee increase follows the publication of an independent review by Lord Browne, former chief executive of BP, a process started by Peter Mandelson, the former Business Secretary. Before the election, two main options were mooted for funding reform in higher education: either an increase in tuition fees or a graduate tax. The Browne Review endorsed the former and the findings of the Review form the basis of the government’s policy. The graduate tax was supported by the Liberal Democrats before the election, and in the Labour leadership elections it was supported by Ed Balls and the winner of the leadership election, Ed Milliband.

Conservative members of the Coalition intend to vote for the reform, and the Labour opposition have been vociferous critics of the rise in fees, despite the previous government’s introduction of top-up fees. The Liberal Democratic members of the Coalition have been left in a politically difficult position regarding the fee hike and have been target of much criticism from protesters. Liberal Democrats have opposed the rise in tuition fees: their party manifesto included a commitment to ending tuition fees within six years, and many signed a pledge organised by the National Union of Students to not vote for any increase in tuition fees.

The Coalition agreement allows Liberal Democrats to opt to abstain on votes for a number of policies including tuition fees. Many Liberal Democrats are expected to abstain, and a few MPs have stated that they will vote against it including former party leader Sir Menzies Campbell, and the recently elected party president Tim Farron, as well as a number of Liberal Democrat back-benchers. Liberal Democrat party leaders have said that they will act collectively, but the BBC have said senior Liberal Democrats have admitted in private that government whips will not be able to force all Liberal Democrats to vote for the policy.

On Tuesday, the Liberal Democrats parliamentary party will meet in the Commons to decide on their collective position. If all ministers decide to vote for the policy, it will probably pass, but if only cabinet ministers (and maybe parliamentary private secretaries) vote for the policy, there is considerable risk of it not passing. If the Coalition does not manage to get the policy through Parliament, it will fuel doubts about the continued effectiveness and viability of the government.

How deputy prime minister Nick Clegg and business secretary Vince Cable vote has been of considerable controversy. Although under the Coalition agreement, they are allowed to abstain, suggestions of doing so have prompted criticism. It was suggested last week that Cable may abstain even though as business secretary he is directly responsible for higher education policy, and has been heavily involved in designing the proposals. Cable has said that Liberal Democrat support of the tuition fee changes has allowed them to push it in a more “progressive” direction.

Cable has now decided that he will vote for the policy, and argues that the policy has “a lot of protection for students from low income backgrounds and graduates who have a low income or take time out for family”. He also believes “there’s common consensus that the system we’ve devised is a progressive one”.

“Dr Cable has performed so many U-turns over the issue of university funding that he is spinning on his heels,” said National Union of Students president Aaron Porter. “That may stand him in good stead with the Strictly Come Dancing judges but the electorate will see it differently.”

Former deputy PM John Prescott has joked about Vince Cable’s u-turns on Twitter.
Image: Steve Punter.

Former deputy prime minister John Prescott joked on Twitter that “On tuition fees we’ve noticed Vince Cable’s remarkable transformation in the last few weeks from stalling to Mr In Between”—a reference to a previous attack Prescott made on Gordon Brown as having transformed from “Stalin to Mr Bean“.

On Question Time this week, Liberal Democrat treasury secretary Danny Alexander also confirmed he is prepared to vote for the policy but delegated the question to the meeting of Liberal Democrats on Tuesday.

The politics of the tuition fee debate may also affect the by-election taking place in Oldham East and Saddleworth following the removal of Phil Woolas, where Liberal Democrat and Conservative candidates will both be standing for the first by-election following the formation of the Coalition government.

Opposition to the policy has become the focus for a large number of protests across the country by both current university students, many school pupils and political allies of the student movement.

On the Nov. 10 demonstration, protestors occupied Millbank tower.
Image: Charlie Owen.

On November 10, between 30,000 and 52,000 protesters from across Britain marched through central London in a demonstration organised by the National Union of Students and the University and College Union, which represents teachers and lecturers in further and higher education. At the November 10 protest, a number of people occupied Millbank Tower, an office block which houses the Conservative Party. Fifty people were arrested and fourteen were injured. NUS president Aaron Porter condemned the attack and said it was caused by “those who are here to cause trouble”, and that the actions of a “minority of idiots” shouldn’t “undermine 50,000 who came to make a peaceful protest”.

Following the November 10 march, other protests have taken place across the country including an occupation at the University of Manchester, a sit-in at the John Owens Building in Manchester, and a demonstration at the University of Cambridge. A protest was also run outside the offices of The Guardian where Nick Clegg—who was giving a lecture inside the building—was executed in effigy while students protested “Nick Clegg, shame on you, shame on you for turning blue” (blue is the colour of the Conservative Party).

A graffitied police van in Trafalgar Square at the November 24 demonstration.
Image: yllA.

On November 24, a large number of protests took place across the country including a mass walk-out from universities and schools organised on Facebook, numerous university occupations, and demonstrations in Manchester, Cambridge, Birmingham, Leeds, Brighton and Cardiff, and a well-publicised occupation of University College London.

In London, a protest was planned to march down Whitehall to Parliament, but police held protesters in Trafalgar Square until they eventually broke free and ran around in a game of “cat and mouse” along the side streets around Charing Cross Road, Covent Garden and Picadilly Circus.

Simon Hardy from the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts described the police response including the controversial ‘kettling’ of protesters as “absolutely outrageous”. Green MP Caroline Lucas raised the police response including the use of kettling in the House of Commons and stated that it was “neither proportionate, nor, indeed, effective”.

On November 30, protests continued in London culminating in 146 arrests of protesters in Trafalgar Square, and protests in Cardiff, Cambridge, Newcastle, Bath, Leeds, Sheffield, Edinburgh, Liverpool, Belfast, Brighton, Manchester and Bristol. Protesters in Sheffield attempted to invade and occupy Nick Clegg’s constituency office. Occupations of university buildings started or continued at University College London, Newcastle University, Cambridge University and Nottingham University, as well as council buildings in Oxford and Birmingham.

A “day of action” is being planned on December 8, the day before the Commons vote, by the National Union of Students.



Sources

Wikinews
This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.
Politics of Liberal Democrat vote
Protests and occupations
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 15, 2010

Pope Benedict XVI heads to the UK amid protests

Pope Benedict XVI heads to the UK amid protests

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Benedict XVI travelling (USA, 2008)
Image: Shealah Craighead / White House.

The Roman Catholic Pontiff is visiting the United Kingdom for the first time since 1982, when his predecessor, Pope John Paul II, was in Britain. The Catholic Church has been preparing an official visit of Benedict XVI for some time, with the visit starting tomorrow. The initial plans were made last September; the visit was only announced on March 16, 2010 when it was officially confirmed by the Vatican. The tour extends through Sunday, and includes stops in Edinburgh, Glasgow, London, and Birmingham, at the latter of which the Pope is going to celebrate the Beatification of Cardinal Newman.

Portrait of Cardinal Newman by Sir John Everett Millais

When Pope Benedict departs from Rome Ciampino Airport at 8:10 am, he will first head to Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh, to meet Queen Elizabeth. After he has presided over several celebrations in Scotland, including an open-air Mass at Bellahouston Park, he will fly to London.

On Friday and Saturday the papal delegation and its leader will remain in the British capital to meet several religious authorities, including the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, leader of the Church of England. Furthermore Benedict XVI will receive courtesy calls from Prime Minister David Cameron as well as the leader of the Opposition Harriet Harman and other political and institutional personalities.

On the last day, Sunday, the Pope will travel by helicopter to Cofton Park, Birmingham, for the Beatification of Cardinal Newman (1801–1890), a priest in the Church of England who converted to the Roman Catholic Church. Newman was defined as “man of conscience” by the Pope in his speech for the centenary of Newman’s death, in 1990.

The first recent source of conflict between British policies and Vatican positions emerged in February in the form of the Equality Bill, aimed at preventing discrimination against heterosexual, homosexual, and transsexual people.

Richard Dawkins
Image: Marty Stone.

In the same period, the National Secular Society launched an online petition called “Make the Pope Pay”. At the deadline of the petition, June 6th, 2010, it counted 12,340 signatures.

On April 11th Richard Dawkins, with Christopher Hitchens‘s support, interviewed by The Sunday Times, said that they were trying to initiate criminal proceedings against the Pope – on the occasion of his visit to UK – over his alleged cover-up of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

David Miliband, Foreign Secretary until May 11th, 2010
Image: Shelley and Alan Heckman.

A further incident happened at the end of April 2010 when a British Foreign Office internal memo (attached to an official document which listed brainstormed ideas for the Pope’s tour) suggested many sarcastic ideas for Benedict XVI. This included launching a condom brand marked “Benedict”, or, during his visit in UK, inaugurating an abortion clinic, blessing a homosexual couple, or ordaining women as priests. The Ministry immediately apologized and explained that the document was only brainstorming that didn’t represent the political positions of the Foreign Office. The Vatican answered via Benedict XVI’s spokesman the Rev. F. Lombardi who said “[a]s far as the Vatican is concerned, the case is closed. There never was the slightest doubt about the trip.”

In the United Kingdom in July, many of the people opposing the Pope’s State visit gathered thanks to a new web site named Protest The Pope, which intends to organize protests against the visit. The events suggested and organized by the site include marches, protests, and cultural events.

Protest The Pope plans the biggest march for Saturday in London, when the Catholic Pontiff will stay in the capital for his tour. The march will start at 1:30 pm from Hyde Park (Piccadilly side) toward Piccadilly Circus, then to Trafalgar Square, Whitehall and Downing Street.

The British Government is expected to spend for public safety and public policy in general more than £12 million (14 million). £1.5 million (€2.2 million) alone is for the evening at Hyde Park.



Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 16, 2008

Thousands attend anti-war protests in London and Glasgow

Thousands attend anti-war protests in London and Glasgow

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, March 16, 2008

Protesters leading the march
Image: Adam Brookes.

Yesterday, thousands of people attended anti-war protests in London and Glasgow organised by the Stop the War Coalition. The event marks nearly five years since the 2003 invasion of Iraq which begun the Iraq War. The main themes were “Troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan”, “Don’t attack Iran”, and “End the siege of Gaza”.

In London, protesters gathered in Trafalgar Square before marching down Whitehall to Parliament Square, across Westminster Bridge, along Lambeth Palace Road before crossing the River Thames again at Lambeth Bridge, returning to Parliament Square via Millbank.

A spokesman for the Foreign Office labelled the Stop the War Coalition’s description of the current situation in Iraq as “simply not accurate”, saying, “In Iraq, there is clear evidence we are making steady progress, particularly in terms of security. We have also acknowledged that mistakes were made, and drawn the appropriate lessons”.

Estimates as to the number of protesters in London range from 10,000 according to the Police, up to 40,000 according to the organisers.



Sources

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
Stop the War protest, March 15 2008
Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 27, 2008

Climate campaigners scale UK Parliament and hang protest banners from the building

Climate campaigners scale UK Parliament and hang protest banners from the building

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, February 27, 2008

Climate change

Global Warming Predictions Map.jpg
Related articles
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

A Boeing 747 descending near London Heathrow Airport.

Campaigners opposed to the expansion of London Heathrow Airport have today scaled the roof of the U.K. Houses of Parliament and hung protest banners reading ‘BAA HQ’ and ‘No 3rd Runway’ from the building, before and during Prime Minister’s Questions inside the building.

The three men and two women were from climate action group, Plane Stupid. The non-violent direct action comes on the day a government consultation into the Heathrow expansion of a third runway ends.

The protesters made paper aeroplanes out of confidential Whitehall documents that allegedly show collusion between the British Airports Authority (B.A.A.) and the Government department of transport to subvert the public consultation process on the proposed third runway. These documents were obtained from the Department for Transport by Greenpeace under the freedom of information act.

B.A.A. claims a third runway is essential for Britain’s economy, and would reduce congestion at Heathrow, actually cutting emissions, and is necessary to keep up with the booming aviation industry. This would allow the number of flights to increase from 480,000 a year to around 702,000 .

In a statement given by one of the protesters from the roof to the Guardian newspaper:

We’ve come to this symbolic home of democracy to make clear that the consultation process of the third runway at Heathrow has, from the beginning, been a sham.

We’re taking direct action as a last resort because we don’t believe that the consultation has been a democratic process. This is the beginning of a campaign of direct action that will not cease until we feel we’re being listened to and until we’re satisfied that it’s Londoners’ views, rather than B.A.A.’s, that the government paying attention to.

Matthew Knowles from the Society of British Aerospace Companies made a statement to the B.B.C. that: “These stunts are becoming tiresome and do nothing more than peddle inaccurate propaganda.”

The rooftop occupation comes two days after Greenpeace protesters scaled an Airbus A320 which had just touched down at Heathrow from Manchester, and follows a succession of direct action protests in the U.K. in relation to climate change.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 11, 2007

War dead remembered 89 years on

War dead remembered 89 years on – Wikinews, the free news source

War dead remembered 89 years on

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, November 11, 2007

Poppies on a War memorial
Image: User:Fir0002.

Millions of people in the United Kingdom, Canada and many other Commonwealth countries observed two minutes silence in memory of the millions who died fighting for their countries during the First World War which ended exactly 89 years ago today.

The U.K. ceremony was held in Whitehall, London where wreaths were laid by the Queen, Duke of Edinburgh and many others including Prince William for the first time. Former Prime Minister Tony Blair and representatives from the Army, Navy and the Royal Air Force amongst others participated in the service which was watched by many thousands across the world.

Britain’s oldest known veteran, Henry Allingham aged 111 years old, laid a wreath in France as part of the international ceremonies which are also taking place in Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka. The two minutes silence at the U.K. ceremony was marked by the firing of a field gun on Horse Guards Parade to begin and end the silence, followed by Royal Marines buglers, playing the Last Post.

Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 11, 2005

Major explosions at UK oil depot

Major explosions at UK oil depot – Wikinews, the free news source

Major explosions at UK oil depot

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, December 11, 2005

Location of Hemel Hempstead within the UK

A shot of the fire taken near the depot

A series of large explosions have occurred close to Hemel Hempstead Hertfordshire, UK. The source of the explosions has been confirmed as the Hertfordshire Oil Storage Terminal (HOSL), Hemel Hempstead, known locally as the Buncefield complex. Up to 150 fire fighters are reported to be at the scene with 10 fire appliances and 1 specialist foamer.

The first ‘blast’ was heard near Hemel Hempstead on Sunday 11 Dec at 6 am. Further smaller explosions followed at 6:24am , 6:26am, 6:30am. BBC News 24 reported an additional, fourth large explosion. Hertfordshire Police Constabulary are currently treating the explosion as an accident.

Reports say the explosion, which registered 2.4 on the Richter scale, was heard as far away as Oxford, and Whitehall, Central London which is 60km (38 miles) away. Eyewitness statements report that the explosion was heard from at least 160km (100 miles) away and as far away as France and The Netherlands. Pilots reported noticing the blast from the North Sea and the West Country area of the UK. The M1 motorway which runs close by has been closed in both directions near the blast which is causing travel chaos as other roads become congested.

Malcom Stewart, a BBC News24 eyewitness who is a tanker driver for the site has reported that the site supplies several oil companies and is a joint operation between Total UK and Texaco, it is also used by BP, Shell and the British Pipeline association. The complex is not a refinery but a storage facility for refined petroleum awaiting distribution to airports and filling stations. The eyewitness reports that the depot has approximately 20 tanks which can hold about 3 million gallons (11 million litres or 70,000 barrels) each. Another News24 eyewitness has just reported that he has seen at least 5 of these tanks on fire.

Satellite image of Hemel Hempstead fuel explosion showing black smoke from the explosion near London

The depot operates on a 24 hour basis and is split into 2 parts – aviation fuel and domestic fuel. A number of eyewitnesses have reported on UK news that the aviation fuel side appears to be the part of the site that has been affected.

Local authorities were not immediately available for comment but there have been reports of casualties.

Some reports on live television state that, “Several other neighbours said they did see a plane go into the depot.” BBC News 24 were also discussing the idea a possible plane crash as the cause of the explosions. Hertfordshire police have now gone on the record to say that there is no plane involved (BBC News24).

The police have issued a contact number 0800 096 0095 and asked that people do not call the emergency services in Hertfordshire directly unless it is an emergency.

Buncefield Fire, taken from Dunsmore, Bucks – about 20miles away.

In addition to being an oil storage depot, it is a major hub on the UK oil pipeline network with pipelines to Killingholme Lindsey Oil Refinery (LOR), Humberside (10 inch), Merseyside (10 and 12 inch), Coryton on the Thames Estuary (14 inch) and Heathrow (6 and 8 inch) and Gatwick airports radiating from it.

The disaster is believed to be the worst explosion at a petrochemical plant in the UK since the Flixborough disaster of 1974. Hertfordshire’s Chief Fire Officer Roy Wilsher said: “This is possibly the largest incident of its kind in peacetime Europe.”

A firefighting press officer said that they are stock piling foam from neighboring regions for a prolonged attach which they hope will stop the spread of the fire, however, the inferno itself will have to burn out which could take between 24 hours and a few days.

Despite the authorities saying that there is no need to panic buy petrol, filling stations have had above average queues since this morning and some small garages have ran out.

Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott has visited the scene.

Smoke Viewed from St Albans

Damage reports

  • Houses half a mile away have had windows smashed and garage doors blown in.
  • BBC News24 (UK) have reported that a nearby building has been destroyed, it is possible that this may be a building belonging to Geest Limited.
  • BBC News24 eyewitnesses reported that the entire depot complex appears to be on fire with buildings on the nearby industrial estate on fire.
  • Police said at a news conference that 36 people were injured, four of them seriously. Police later revised the numbers to 43 injured, two seriously.
  • A fire service spokesman said that the explosions caused a “fairly major fire at a factory” on the adjoining industrial estate.

Cause

Police are discounting the reports of a small plane being heard nearby just before the explosion.

An oil industry specialist reported on BBC News that a vapour leak could have built up to explosive concentrations because of the ground frost in the area keeping vapour concentration at ground level. This would have resulted in a fuel-air explosion[1]. Eyewitnesses report seeing vapour and smelling petrol just before the explosion, leading experts to speculate that there may have been a fuel spillage or vapour leak. A BBC News 24 interview with a petrol tanker driver, who was about to load his tanker at 6am, reported a cloud of mist rolling in from the tank farm area behind the loading bay. All electric lights were turned off and they were ordered to leave the site on foot. As he was doing so a blast blew him off his feet. In another interview a security guard in a nearby office building reported an unusual smell of petrol inside his building before the explosion.

Exquisite-Modem.png

UK Emergency contact number 0800 096 0095

People calling from outside of the UK should call +44 20 7158 0125

Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
2005 Hertfordshire Oil Storage Terminal fire

Links to Pictures

External links

Wikinews
This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 21, 2005

Four small explosions strike London\’s transport system

Four small explosions strike London’s transport system

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, July 21, 2005

The location of Shepherd’s Bush on the Hammersmith and City Line

London Metropolitan Police commissioner Sir Ian Blair has confirmed that there have been three small explosions on tube trains at Warren Street, Oval and Shepherd’s Bush stations, and another small explosion on a No. 26 bus on Hackney Road in Bethnal Green.

The London Ambulance Service has not found any injured people, but one person has reported themselves to a local hospital. It is not yet known if this is connected with the blasts.

The location of Warren Street and Oval on the Northern line

All the devices were “conventional” but possibly faulty, and contained no chemical or biological agents. Not all the bombs exploded fully; Bomb Squad officers are working on making them safe. There are no reports of the deaths of suspects who attempted to set the explosives off.

Incidents

A spokesman for Stagecoach said the driver of the number 26 bus travelling through Shoreditch had heard a bang on upper deck, gone upstairs and seen the windows were blown out. The bus driver was very shaken but is said to be fine. Reports of the windows having been blown out have been denied by a police officer on the scene. “I have seen the bus. There were no windows blown out,” the officer told Reuters.

One injury sustained at Warren Street tube station has been confirmed by authorities. There have been no other reports of injuries, and authorities are reporting no casualties.

At around 15:25, a man was arrested by armed police in Whitehall, which is cordoned off. A second man was arrested in the Whitehall area around 16:15, but Police have confirmed that this arrest is unconnected with the explosions.

Armed police were deployed at UCL Hospital, near Warren Street tube station, after reports of a suspect entering the hospital. There was speculation that one of the bombers may have been injured and sought treatment at the hospital. A Scotland Yard spokesman had said “We are dealing with an incident at University College Hospital and we have armed officers deployed there. We cannot go in any further detail at this stage.” A UCL spokeswoman confirmed that an email had been sent to staff asking them to be on the lookout for the suspect. At 16:00 a spokesman for the Metropolitan police confirmed that the incident was over, but armed police returned to the hospital 30 minutes later to search the premises. Police have now also confirmed this is unrelated to the explosions.

Responses

A picture of the Holborn area, where traffic has been suspended due to the events

Prime Minister Tony Blair has cancelled a visit to an east London school and a photocall with visiting Prime Minister John Howard of Australia, instead heading to a COBRA committee emergency meeting. Australian Prime Minister John Howard is in London and is involved in discussions with Tony Blair as this unfolds.

In a public press conference, Blair said that “there appear to have been no casualties”, and that he wanted people to “React calmly, and continue with our lives”. John Howard also stated that Australia stood by Britain and that people should “beware the minds of terrorists.”

Police initially advised against unnecessary travel in London, asking Londoners to keep travel to a minimum and avoid the public transport system. At 15:52 Sir Ian Blair of the Metropolitan Police has asked Londoners to return to their normal activities, including travel. He also stated that some public transport services are not yet functioning.

A release from Scotland Yard stated that there was no chemical agents found after checking the Oval. Investigations at Shepherd’s Bush station also confirmed no chemical agents.

Closures

The Northern line, the Hammersmith and City Line, the Piccadilly Line, and the Bakerloo Line have been suspended. Victoria Line and the Waterloo and City Line were suspended but reopened shortly after. Whitehall had been sealed off but reopened shortly after, only to be closed again after armed police surrounded and arrested a man outside the Ministry of Defence, however at a press conference at 17:45 Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Ian Blair said that this arrest was unconnected with the explosions.

Unconfirmed reports

July 7 London bombings
Latest coverage
  • Tributes paid to the victims of the July 7 2005 London bombings
  • Footage of 7/7 bombers shown to court
  • London’s Metropolitan Police Service found guilty in suspected suicide bomber case
  • Five found guilty of UK bomb plot
  • One year on, London remembers 7/7 victims
  • London bomb survivors launch campaign for public inquiry
  • London bomb suspect returned from Italy
  • London bombers rehearsed attacks
See also
Background
  • Profile: Al Qaeda
  • A list of terrorist incidents

Various news sites are reporting a minor explosion in a passenger’s backpack. A BBC correspondent, claiming to have sources working in the London Underground, suggested the explosions were only detonators and that the bombs contained no explosives. It is also believed that reports of gunshots being heard at the stations are mistaken, passengers simply mistaking the sound of the detonators for the sound of gunshots.

A spokesman for London Underground has stated the nature of the incidents is unknown.

Eyewitness reports from Warren Street say that something happened towards the front of the train. The passengers all headed towards the back of the train. As the train pulled into the station somebody pulled the emergency alarm and all the passengers got off the train. There are reports of a ‘burning rubber’ smell from eyewitnesses.

25% of Shepherd’s Bush / Uxbridge Road and all of Shepherd’s Bush Green is sealed off.

Eyewitness report of “bang” in a carriage at Oval station. No injuries. After being spotted the suspect fled the station, leaving the suspect package unexploded in a carriage. (BBC News 24)

London Police are not regarding this as a major incident yet. (BBC News 24)

British Transport Police report there has been one injury at Warren Street Station. No details as to the cause and nature of this injury are available, although BBC News are speculating that the injury is to the person who set off the device.

There are reports of problems sending text messages or making calls from mobiles phones on some networks. (O2 confirmed, Orange is fine, occasional text service but no calls on Vodafone) O2 provide communications services for emergency teams across the UK and have previously prioritized their network usage for this use.

Emergency Numbers

Police evacuate the area near St Paul’s Cathedral after the explosions. Photo: Adam Randall

Note: Please don’t call these numbers just because you can’t get through – some of the mobile networks are temporarily down or disrupted. At the moment the services are saying there are no mass casualties from these incidents (see below).

  • Central emergency number: 0870 156 6344 (Metropolitan Police)
  • Metropolitan Police: 020 7766 6020 (UK)   +44 20 7766 6020 (International)
  • British Transport Police: 020 8358 0101 (UK)   +44 20 8358 0101 (International)
  • Those outside the UK should see the list of Foreign Ministry contact details.

Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
21 July 2005 London explosions
Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 8, 2005

VE Day 60th anniversary commemorated across Europe & USA

VE Day 60th anniversary commemorated across Europe & USA

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, May 8, 2005

File:D-day battle order.jpg

Archive picture of D-day battle order.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

The Arc de Triomphe during the May 8, 2005, celebrations

Jacques Chirac and other officials

The 60th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day has been commemorated Sunday across Europe and the USA.

  • In Germany: President of Germany Horst Köhler and Chancellor Gerhard Schröder attended a service at the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Berlin and a wreath-laying ceremony at the main Soviet war memorial. VE Day is commemorated as Democracy Day in Germany, as Germans consider it to be the day when they, too, were liberated from Nazism.
  • In the United Kingdom:
    • Prince Charles, wearing his uniform of Vice Admiral in the Royal Navy, laid a commemorative wreath at the Cenotaph. Queen Elizabeth is scheduled to attend the main commemorative ceremony to be held on July 10, 2005.
    • At 19:00 UTC a Dakota DC3, from the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight based at RAF Coningsby, flew over the Palace of Westminster, Whitehall, and Trafalgar Square to mark the beginning of a televised BBC VE Day concert.
  • In France: President of France Jacques Chirac laid a memorial wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the Arc de Triomphe.
  • In the Netherlands: President of the United States George W. Bush and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands attended a memorial ceremony at a United States military cemetery near Maastricht, where the Last Post was sounded.
  • In Croatia: President of Croatia Stjepan Mesić gave a controversial speech at a commemorative celebration of victory over fascism in Zagreb, starting with “Comrades, ladies and gentlemen.” He said that NDH, a World War Two Croatian state, was “founded on crime” and is “a discrace and an insult to Croats.” The role of Ustaše and Partisans during the World War Two is still a point of debate in Croatia.
  • In the United States: Former Sen. Bob Dole spoke during a Sunday ceremony commemorating the anniversary of allied victory in Europe, May 8, 1945. The ceremony was held near the National World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The 60th anniversary of Victory Day is scheduled to be celebrated in Russia, and other successor states of the Soviet Union, on May 9, 2005.

Related news

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress