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July 5, 2016

Icide bomber attacks Medina on Eid

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Icide bomber attacks Medina on Eid – Wikinews, the free news source

Icide bomber attacks Medina on Eid

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Tuesday, July 5, 2016

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Suicide bomber attacks Medina on Eid

Suicide bomber attacks Medina on Eid – Wikinews, the free news source

Suicide bomber attacks Medina on Eid

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Tuesday, July 5, 2016

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Yesterday, a suicide attack was committed moments before sunset in the holy city in Medina, Saudi Arabia killing four officials and injuring three in the Al-Masjid an-Nabawi mosque (Prophet’s mosque), interior ministry said. Earlier yesterday, two Saudi cities Jeddah and Quatif suffered attacks. Pilgrims were praying the Maghrib prayer before breaking their Ramadan fast.

Smoke rising from the Al-Masjid an-Nabawi
Image: Mynameisparatha.

36-year-old eyewitness Qari Ziyaad Patel told Associated Press that he heard a blast just as the call to sunset prayers was ending and people were breaking their fast. Many at first thought it was the sound of traditional, celebratory cannon fire, but then he felt the ground shake.

Al Arabiya‘s correspondent reported that after the explosion pilgrims offered Isha prayer in the Prophet’s mosque and no worshippers were not injured in the suicide attacks. The Interior Ministry has identified the suicide bomber. According to them, Abdullah Khan Waqar was responsible for the attack. Waqar was born in Pakistan and lived in Jeddah past twelve years.

The chairman of the International Union of Muslim Scholars Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi condemned the attack and said, “Islam is innocent of these criminal acts harvested safe lives and shed pure blood.”((ar)) Abu Dhabi prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan tweeted, It’s time we work together to save our religion from these deadly criminal gangs.((ar))

This week, three Islamic countries – Turkey, Bangladesh and Iraq faced terror attacks in Istanbul, Dhaka and Baghdad.


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Suicide bomber attacks Medina Mosque before Eid al-Fitr

Suicide bomber attacks Medina Mosque before Eid al-Fitr

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Tuesday, July 5, 2016

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Yesterday, a suicide attack was committed moments before sunset in the holy city in Medina, Saudi Arabia killing four officials and injuring five in Al-Masjid an-Nabawi, the Prophet’s Mosque, the Saudi interior ministry said. Earlier yesterday, two Saudi cities Jeddah and Quatif suffered attacks. Pilgrims were praying before breaking their Ramadan fast.

File photo of Al-Masjid an-Nabawi.
Image: Imam Khairul Annas.

36-year-old eyewitness Qari Ziyaad Patel told Associated Press he heard a blast just as the call to sunset prayers was ending and people were breaking their fast. At first it was widely mistaken for cannon fire traditionally signaling the end of daily fasting during Ramadan, but then they felt the vibrations through the ground.

Al Arabiya‘s correspondent reported that after the explosion pilgrims offered prayers in the Prophet’s Mosque and no worshippers were injured in the suicide attacks. The Interior Ministry has identified the suicide bomber. According to them, Abdullah Waqar Khan was responsible for the attack. Waqar, they said, was born in Pakistan and had lived in Jeddah for the past twelve years.

The chairman of the International Union of Muslim Scholars Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi condemned the attack and said, “Islam is innocent of these criminal acts that harvested safe lives and shed pure blood.”((ar)) Abu Dhabi prince Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan tweeted, “It’s time we work together to save our religion from these deadly criminal gangs.((ar))

This week, three Islamic countries – Turkey, Bangladesh, and Iraq — faced terror attacks in Istanbul, Dhaka, and Baghdad.



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  • “Suicide bombers attack Istanbul’s Ataturk airport” — Wikinews, June 29, 2016

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June 29, 2016

Suicide bombers attack Istanbul\’s Ataturk airport

Suicide bombers attack Istanbul’s Ataturk airport

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Wednesday, June 29, 2016

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Yesterday, three individuals committed a suicide attack on Ataturk airport in Istanbul, Turkey.

Ataturk Airport overview
Image: Ercan Karakaş.

The attack started with the three individuals shooting weapons near the terminal entrance. After police started to return fire the individuals blew themselves up.

41 people were killed in the attack, and at least another 239 injured, according to officials. Those killed include nationals of several countries, including Saudi Arabia and Iraq.

While no group has claimed responsibility for the attack, the Turkish Prime Minister, Binali Yildirim, stated current details point towards the Islamic State (IS) militant group as the culprits. This group has previously been blamed for a number of attacks in Turkey since last July.

The BBC reported IS have been targeting Turkey as being too connected to the West through NATO, as well as seeing its government as not being Islamic enough.

The attacks have led to concerns for the Turkish tourism sector, considered important to the country’s economy.

President Barack Obama of the United States and President Vladmir Putin of Russia both condemned the attack. Russia also announced it had lifted trade and travel restrictions which had been in place since Turkey shot down a Russian fighter Jet last November.

Today has been declared a day of national mourning in Turkey.



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January 2, 2016

Saudi Arabia executes 47 people as \’terrorists\’

Saudi Arabia executes 47 people as ‘terrorists’

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Saturday, January 2, 2016

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Yesterday, Saudi Arabian officials said they have executed 47 people whom courts convicted as terrorists.

Officials said the executions were not done in public. Saudi cleric Grand Mufti Sheikh Abdulaziz al-Sheikh in justifying the executions cited Saudi Arabia’s interpretation of Sharia Law and said the executions prevented the accused from committing further crime, calling it a form of “mercy”.

File photo of Dira Square, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where public executions are carried out under Sharia Law; Saudi officials said the 47 people executed were not executed publicly, but rather within prisons.
Image: Luke Richard Thompson.

Some of those executed were reportedly Al-Qaeda militants behind terrorist attacks. Before the executions, an Al-Qaeda branch from Yemen threatened Saudi authorities with violence if they executed their members.

Among those executed was a Shia Muslim cleric who criticized both the royal family of Saudi Arabia and that of Bahrain; he condemned Bahrain‘s suppression of protests with Saudi aid. He reportedly avoided advocating violence. He was convicted of causing violence against authorities, and a Saudi court rejected his appeal of his conviction this past year. His execution led to condemnation from Iranian officials, who had previously said it “would cost Saudi Arabia dearly”.

When news broke the 47 were to be executed, in November, regional Amnesty International director James Lynch said Saudi Arabia was settling “political scores” under “the guise of counter-terrorism.”

The organization said at least 150 people have been executed in Saudi Arabia in 2015, while only 90 were executed a year ago in 2014.



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Saudi Arabia executes 47 people said to be \”terrorists\”

Saudi Arabia executes 47 people said to be “terrorists”

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Saturday, January 2, 2016

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File photo of Dira Square, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where public executions are carried out under Sharia Law; Saudi officials said that the 47 people executed were not executed publicly, but rather within prisons.
Image: Luke Richard Thompson.

On Sunday, Saudi Arabian officials said that they have executed 47 people who courts convicted as terrorists.

Officials said that the executions were not done in public. Saudi cleric Grand Mufti Sheikh Abdulaziz al-Sheikh justified the executions, saying the executions, done under Saudi Arabia’s interpretation of Sharia Law, prevented the accused from committing further crime, calling it a form of “mercy”.

Some of those executed were reportedly Al-Qaeda militants behind terrorist attacks. Before the executions, an Al-Qaeda branch from Yemen has threatened Saudi authorities with violence if they executed their members.

Among those executed was a Shia Muslim cleric who criticized both the royal family of Saudi Arabia and that of Bahrain; he condemned Bahrain’s suppression of protests under Saudi aid. Despite claiming that he did not advocate violence, he was still convicted for causing violence against authorities, and a Saudi court rejected his appeal of his conviction last year. His execution led to condemnation from Iranian officials, who said that it would cost Saudi Arabia “dearly”.

When news broke that the 47 were to be executed in November, a regional Amnesty International director, James Lynch, said that Saudi Arabia was settling “political scores” under “the guise of counter-terrorism.”

The organization said that at least 150 people have been executed in Saudi Arabia in 2015, while only 90 were executed a year ago in 2014.



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November 27, 2015

At least 52 people, including 6 Shia Muslim activists, to be executed in Saudi Arabia

At least 52 people, including 6 Shia Muslim activists, to be executed in Saudi Arabia

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Friday, November 27, 2015

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In Saudi Arabia, six Shia Muslim activists, along with many others, are to be executed for terrorism on an unspecified date.

According to local media reports from Thursday, at least 52 people will be executed. The Saudi Arabian newspaper Okaz said some of the people convicted of terrorism were members of the militant group Al-Qaeda. They have allegedly killed at least a hundred civilians and seventy security personnel, and were convicted with attempting to overthrow the government and planning terrorist attacks.

Others who are also to be executed were people from the city of Awamiya, where most of the population consists of Shia Muslims, a minority within Saudi Arabia. Numerous protests have previously been held there due to alleged mistreatment of Shias by the government. Among those convicted of terrorism were the six Shia Muslim activists, three of whom were minors when they allegedly committed their crimes. Amnesty International has said the trials leading up to their conviction were clearly “unfair”.

File photo of Dira Square, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where public executions are carried out under Sharia Law.
Image: Luke Richard Thompson.

James Lynch, Middle East and North Africa deputy director of Amnesty International, said Saudi Arabia was settling “political scores” under “the guise of counter-terrorism.”

The three Shias, Ali al-Nimr, Abdullah al-Zaher, and Hussein al-Marhoon, said they have confessed to their supposed criminal acts under torture, according to Lynch.

At least 150 people have been executed in Saudi Arabia in 2015, while only 90 were executed a year ago in 2014, said Amnesty International.

This news came after Saudi-born Palestinian poet Ashraf Fayadh was convicted of apostasy and sentenced to death by a court in Saudi Arabia, which Human Rights Watch researcher Adam Coogle called an example of Saudi Arabia’s “complete intolerance for anyone who may not share government-mandated religious, political, and social views.”



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At least 52, including six Shia Muslim activists, to be executed in Saudi Arabia

At least 52, including six Shia Muslim activists, to be executed in Saudi Arabia

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Friday, November 27, 2015

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In Saudi Arabia, six Shia Muslim activists, along with at least 46 other people, are to be executed for terrorism on an unspecified date, according to reports on Thursday.

Varying local media reports said at least 52 people will be executed. Saudi Arabian newspaper Okaz said some of the people convicted of terrorism were members of the militant group Al-Qaeda, and were convicted of attempting to overthrow the government and planning terrorist attacks. The 52 have allegedly killed at least a hundred civilians and seventy security personnel.

Amnesty International said others who are also to be executed were people from the city of Awamiya, where most of the population consists of Shia Muslims, a minority within Saudi Arabia. Protests have been held there, across the past several years, over alleged mistreatment of Shias by the government. Among those convicted of terrorism were the six Shia Muslim activists, at least two of whom reportedly were minors when they allegedly committed their crimes. Amnesty International has said the trials leading up to their conviction were clearly “unfair”.

File photo of Dira Square, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where public executions are carried out under Sharia Law.
Image: Luke Richard Thompson.

James Lynch, Middle East and North Africa deputy director of Amnesty International, said Saudi Arabia was settling “political scores” under “the guise of counter-terrorism.”

The three Shias, Ali al-Nimr, Abdullah al-Zaher, and Hussein al-Marhoon, said they have confessed to their supposed criminal acts under torture, according to Lynch.

More than 150 people have been executed in Saudi Arabia in 2015, while only 90 were executed a year ago in 2014, said Amnesty International.

This news came after Saudi-born Palestinian poet Ashraf Fayadh was convicted of apostasy and sentenced to death by a court in Saudi Arabia, which Human Rights Watch researcher Adam Coogle called an example of Saudi Arabia’s “complete intolerance for anyone who may not share government-mandated religious, political, and social views.”



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November 21, 2015

Saudi Arabian court convicts poet of apostasy, sentences him to death

Saudi Arabian court convicts poet of apostasy, sentences him to death

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Saturday, November 21, 2015

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A file photo of Dira Square, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where public executions are carried out under Sharia Law
Image: Luke Richard Thompson.

A court in Saudi Arabia sentenced Saudi-born Palestinian poet Ashraf Fayadh to death on Tuesday for allegedly committing apostasy, a crime that is punishable by capital punishment under Saudi Arabia’s interpretation of Sharia Law. The court decision was brought to light on Friday by Adam Coogle, a researcher working for Human Rights Watch.

Fayadh has previously posted a video online showing religious police lashing a person in public. Mona Kareem, an activist from Kuwait asking for Fayadh’s release, said that “some Saudis think this was revenge by the morality police.”

Police detained Fayadh in August 2013, accusing him of blasphemy and promoting atheism through his poems. According to Fayadh, this stemmed from a dispute with a fellow artist. He was soon released under bail.

Fayadh was again arrested in January 2014. He was tried at a court in Abha in February under allegations of committing blasphemy, promoting atheism, and having illegal relationships with women. He was sentenced in May that year to 4 years of jail and 800 lashes. Fayadh appealed the decision, and the case was retried by another judge, who sentenced him to death.

Activist Mona Kareem said that the judge for Fayadh’s retrial “didn’t even talk” to Fayadh before he “just made the verdict.”

Fayadh was given 30 days to appeal the court ruling, but according to Kareem Fayadh was unable to be assigned a lawyer because “his ID was confiscated when he was arrested” in January 2014.

Human Rights Watch researcher Adam Coogle called the court ruling an example of Saudi Arabia’s “complete intolerance for anyone who may not share government-mandated religious, political, and social views.”



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Saudi Arabian court convicts poet of apostasy, sentences to death

Saudi Arabian court convicts poet of apostasy, sentences to death

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Saturday, November 21, 2015

Saudi Arabia
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A court in Saudi Arabia sentenced Saudi-born Palestinian poet Ashraf Fayadh to death on Tuesday for allegedly committing apostasy, a crime punishable by death under Saudi Arabia’s interpretation of Sharia Law. The court decision was brought to light yesterday by Adam Coogle, a researcher working for Human Rights Watch.

File photo of Dira Square, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, where public executions are carried out under Sharia Law.
Image: Luke Richard Thompson.

Fayadh has previously posted a video online of a public lashing by religious police. Mona Kareem, an activist from Kuwait calling for Fayadh’s release, said “some Saudis think this was revenge by the morality police.”

Fayadh was detained by police in August 2013, accused of blasphemy and promoting atheism through his poems. According to Fayadh, this stemmed from a dispute with a fellow artist. He was soon released under bail.

Fayadh was again arrested in January 2014. He was tried at a court in Abha in February under allegations of committing blasphemy, promoting atheism, and having illegal relationships with women. He was sentenced in May that year to four years of jail and 800 lashes. Fayadh appealed the decision, and the case was retried by another judge, who sentenced him to death.

Activist Mona Kareem said the judge for Fayadh’s retrial “didn’t even talk to [Fayadh], he just made the verdict.”

Fayadh was given 30 days to appeal the court ruling, but according to Kareem, Fayadh “was unable to assign a lawyer because his ID was confiscated when he was arrested” in January 2014.

Human Rights Watch researcher Adam Coogle called the court ruling an example of Saudi Arabia’s “complete intolerance for anyone who may not share government-mandated religious, political, and social views.”



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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