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April 4, 2014

Death of captive rhino halts propagation efforts in US

Death of captive rhino halts propagation efforts in US

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Friday, April 4, 2014

Dr. Terri Roth, director of CREW, with Suci.
Image: Cincinnati Zoo.

Dr Roth gave an overview of the Sumatran rhino project at USI less than a week after Suci’s death.
Video: Rfshipman1.

After the death of the Cincinnati Zoo’s female Sumatran rhinoceros last Sunday, Dr. Terri Roth, the director of the zoo’s research facility specializing in propagation, told Wikinews her organization remains committed to the Sumatran rhinos, an animal that is currently listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as critically endangered.

Suci (pictured left with Roth), the last female in captivity in the United States, died and was one of only two Sumatran rhinos in captivity in the United States.

The number of Sumatran rhinos worldwide is now around 100, according to Roth, who is the vice president of Conservation and Science and the director of Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) at Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden in Ohio. She told Wikinews her research facility will continue to work with its partners abroad and focus on genetic diversity.

“Realistically, the odds are against us. This is going to be a tough one to save. It’s been a roller coaster experience and it’s been a challenge,” said Roth.

In the 1980s, Indonesia and the United States entered into a pact to save the animal. According to the plan, Indonesia would enclose captured rhinos in a secure wildlife habitat and provide United States zoos with additional captured rhinos, with the two working together to rebuild the population using the wildlife and captivity. The US program experienced a set back when four out of its seven rhinos died, while zoos were learning to feed them ficus rather than hay.

Roth is an expert on the propagation of the Sumatran rhino. Since the late 1990s, when the Cincinnati Zoo received the last three surviving captive rhinos in the United States, she has studied their mating and pregnancy. This led to the ability to detect pregnancy within sixteen days of conception by ultrasound. After five failed pregnancies, Roth tried hormone treatments of progesterone with success. In 2001, CREW and the Cincinnati Zoo celebrated the first rhino birth in captivity in 112 years, a male named Andalas. The previous Sumatran rhino birth in captivity occurred in 1889 in a zoo in Calcutta, India.

Roth’s work with Emi also produced Suci, a female born in 2004; and Harapan, a male born in 2007. Andalas was returned to Indonesia to sire Andatu, another success in the joint Indonesia-US project. Back in the US, the CREW facility would have to partner Suci with her brother Harapan once he reached sexual maturity between six to seven years age. Suci’s death on Sunday ended that plan.

“We were hoping to produce another calf, for a number of different reasons. One is that the females do lose fertility over time if they don’t get pregnant. So we thought even though were not doing a good genetic match, at least getting her pregnant would preserve her fertility. Although, we never got the opportunity to do that.” Roth said.

Indonesia will not be sending the US zoos any more Sumatran rhinos, Roth said, and for Indonesia it is a matter of national pride to rescue the Sumatran rhino.


SumatranRhino3 CincinnatiZoo.jpg

Sumatran Rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) at Cincinnati Zoo.
Image: Ltshears.

Dr Terri Roth.jpg

Dr. Terri Roth, director of Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife.
Image: Snbehnke.

Dr Terri Roth at USI.jpg

Dr. Terri Roth tells an audience at the annual Marlene V. Shaw Biology Lecture at the University of Southern Indiana about the work of Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW).
Image: Miharris.

Terri Roth's Presentation 2.JPG

Dr. Terri Roth giving her presentation on Sumatran Rhinos.
Image: Snbehnke.



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November 17, 2009

Poaching in Zimbabwe on the rise

Poaching in Zimbabwe on the rise – Wikinews, the free news source

Poaching in Zimbabwe on the rise

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Tuesday, November 17, 2009

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A wildlife official in Zimbabwe said today that the amount of animal poaching in the country has increased substantially this year, blaming an international crime syndicate. He said that 65 elephants and 30 rhinoceroses have been killed this year by poachers.

“From January to October this year we have lost 65 elephants through poaching,” said Vitalis Chadenga, the operations director of the Zimbabwe National Parks and Wildlife Authority. “In the same period we have lost 24 black and six white rhinos. It is true that we have witnessed an escalation of poaching nationwide, particularly on private farms.”

“We do have a group of international gangsters, who are funding poachers around this part of the world and taking away many horns and it is a major problem,” the director continued; “we have arrested 2,500 poachers in the same period, ten poachers have been shot dead since the beginning of this year.”

Zimbabwe is one of four countries in Africa that are home to large numbers of rhinos, the others being Kenya, Namibia, and South Africa. About 100,000 elephants live in Zimbabwe, and Chandenga said that the numbers have been growing in past years.



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April 25, 2007

Rare rhino caught on videotape

Rare rhino caught on videotape – Wikinews, the free news source

Rare rhino caught on videotape

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Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Screenshot of the Borneo Rhino caught on videotape. Credit: WWF.

A camera set up in the jungles of Malaysian Borneo in Sabah by the World Wide Fund for Nature or WWF, has captured, for the first time, a Borneo Rhino on videotape.

“This astonishing footage captures of one of the world’s most elusive creatures. Tremendous progress has been made in recent years to secure the rhino’s habitat but so much more needs to be done considering this species may very well disappear in the next 10 years,” said President and CEO of the World Wildlife Fund in a press release, Carter Roberts.

In the video, the rhino comes out of the jungle brush and then proceeds to sniff the camera and equipment surrounding it. The video also shows the rhino getting a bite to eat.

It is estimated that there are only 25 to 50 of the rhinos alive on the planet, and they can only be found in the jungles of Sabah, or better known as the “Heart of Borneo.” For the past 20 years, the rhino has not been reported anywhere else in Sabah and researchers say that it is likely “extinct” in the rest of Malaysia.

Researchers say that poaching to use the rhino’s horn in medicine and encroachment into their habitats are causing them to decline. Researchers also say that because the rhino is so isolated from the rest of Malaysia, that they are rarely able to breed together.

“The rhino is very sensitive to the presence of human beings. Till now, we can still see the rhino, but if we cannot develop any kind of protection method, I think the rhinos will survive less than 10 years,” said a project manager for the WWF for elephants and rhinos in the Borneo region, Raymond Alfred.

In 2006, the first ever still image was captured of the rhino.

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November 20, 2006

UK soldiers kill rare African animal

UK soldiers kill rare African animal – Wikinews, the free news source

UK soldiers kill rare African animal

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Monday, November 20, 2006

UK troops in Kenya killed a white rhino after it allegedly charged at them.

The White Rhinoceros* or Square-lipped rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) is one of the five species of rhinoceros that still exists and is one of the few megafauna species left. The White Rhino is under threat from habitat loss and poaching, most recently by an offshoot of the janjaweed. A recent population count in the Congo turned up only 10 rhinos left in the wild, which led conservationists in January 2005 to propose airlifting White Rhinos from Garamba into Kenya, where their numbers decreased to less than 200*. Although official approval was initially obtained, resentment of foreign interference within the Congo has prevented the airlift from happening as of the beginning of 2006.

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January 18, 2005

White rhinos fly to safety

White rhinos fly to safety – Wikinews, the free news source

White rhinos fly to safety

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Tuesday, January 18, 2005

Nairobi – Five of the last remaining northern white rhinos in the wild will be airlifted from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to Kenya in coming weeks. This is a desperate move to save the population from extinction.

In 2003, about 30 rhinos lived in Garamba National Park. Since then, heavily-armed poaching gangs have slaughtered around 20 of these animals. Kes Hillman Smith of the Rhino Project at International Rhino Foundation (IRF) now believes there are fewer than 10 animals left in the park.

Sometime before the rainy season begins in February, the rhinos will be flown by military transport plane or helicopter to a private reserve in central Kenya.

Outside of the Garamba National Park, there are also 10 northern white rhinos in captivity. However, it is very difficult to breed them in captivity.

Trade in rhino horn has been banned internationally since 1977, but it is worth more than $1200 (USD) per kilogram on the black market.

References


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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