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July 14, 2016

UN tribunal dismisses Chinese claims to South China Sea

UN tribunal dismisses Chinese claims to South China Sea

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Thursday, July 14, 2016

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Map of South China Sea.
Image: Nzeemin, NordNordWest.

On Tuesday, a United Nations (UN) tribunal in The Hague dismissed China‘s sovereignty claims to the South China Sea, a body of water connecting to the Pacific Ocean which is also bordered by the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Indonesia. Court battles over the claims between China and the Philippines go back to 2013.

These claims were established by China during the reign of its Nationalist government in the 1940s, marked by a demarcation line nicknamed its Nine-dash line. Its line stretched hundreds of miles from the Chinese mainland, including about nine tenths of the entire sea. The South China Sea is a valuable property, providing passage for about US$5 trillion in trade by planes and boats every year. China is not the only country to claim large parts of the sea; notably, Taiwan and Vietnam have also done so, but other large-scale claimants have been less militarily active about their claims than China.

China has built several artificial islands and military bases in the South China Sea. The tribunal scolded the impeding of fishing and exploration in the sea by China, which it deemed against the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), signed by China in 1982. The tribunal also concluded China knowingly permitted the poaching of endangered turtles and clams as well as destroyed coral reefs to construct artificial islands.

UNCLOS permits countries to claim a 200-nautical mile area from their mainland, referred to as an exclusive economic zone. It also permits freedom of navigation, allowing unimpeded exploration through “high seas”: international waters also available for the use of fishing and trade passages.

There is no process to enforce the decision. UNCLOS allows countries to exclude themselves from “compulsory binding procedures for the settlement of disputes” as defined in Part XV, Section 3 – Article 298. China exercised this right to exclude themselves from compulsory binding procedures on August 25, 2006. They reject the jurisdiction or authority of the tribunal’s findings. Various other countries have also exercised Article 298 partially or fully, such as Australia, Canada, the UK, Russia, and France.

Many nations made statements after the decision. The Chinese government opposed the decision, calling it “ill-founded”. It said “China neither accepts nor recognizes” the decision. The Philippine government referred to the decision as a “milestone decision”. The US, a key ally with many of the countries claiming parts of the sea, said it was an “important contribution to the shared goal of a peaceful resolution to disputes in the South China Sea”.



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December 2, 2015

Investigators blame pilot error for AirAsia crash into Java Sea

Investigators blame pilot error for AirAsia crash into Java Sea

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Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee yesterday declared pilot error to be behind the crash of Indonesia AirAsia Flight 8501. All 162 passengers and crew died when the plane crashed into the Java Sea a year ago.

The crashed aircraft, photographed in April 2014.
Image: Oka Sudiatmika.

The Airbus A320-200 was around 40 minutes from Surabaya’s Juanda International Airport to Singapore’s Changi International Airport when it vanished on December 28. Wreckage and bodies were found floating two days later; National Search and Rescue Agency divers led an international recovery effort but over 50 bodies remain lost.

The pilots were facing a fault with the rudder travel limiter, a part involved in rudder control. They repeatedly received warnings on their Electronic Centralized Aircraft Monitoring (ECAM) system. The first three times Indonesian Pilot Iriyanto and French co-pilot Remi Emmanuel Plesel followed correct procedure only for the fault to recur. The fourth time, they tried something else — based on Flight Data Recorder readouts, investigators believe they reset power to their Flight Augmentation Computers.

The computers are principally responsible for rudder control and aircraft stability. With both computers switched off, the entire fly-by-wire system of semi-automation disconnected, as did the autopilot and autothrust systems. The pilots were now left to fly entirely manually, without automation that protects the aircraft from entering unusual and dangerous positions.

A miscommunication followed. Iriyanto asked Plesel, who was flying, to “pull down”. Plesel pulled the controls down, which pitched the nose up; Iriyanto had wanted to descend. The flight ascended without permission through 36,000ft with a ground speed of 353knts. The aircraft would normally be travelling faster, with a nearby Emirates jet at a ground speed of 503knts at 36,000ft. The aircraft also banked as the disengagement of automation left the rudder off-centre.

A ship carries the aircraft’s recovered tail.
Image: Antonio P. Turretto Ramos, US Navy.

The AirAsia flight reached 38,000ft and entered a stall. The crew did not manage to regain control. The 155 passengers and seven crew died when the plane hit the sea. Most were Indonesians, but for three South Koreans, one Malaysian, one Brit, and French national Plesel.

The fault was traced to cracked solder on a circuit board. It had repeatedly occurred in the weeks before the crash. The investigation concluded maintenance failings contributed to the disaster, but Muhammad Alwi of the Indonesian Transportation Ministry said “Repeated trouble in maintenance is a normal thing[…] If the trouble is fixed in accordance with the manual maintenance procedures, then it’s alright”.

Investigators believe the solder crack is attributable to extreme temperature changes in the unprotected compartment near the tail that houses the component.

The investigation further found the flight crew were untrained in recovering from extreme events. AirAsia boss Tony Fernandes said yesterday “there is much to be learned here for AirAsia, the manufacturer and the aviation industry… We will not leave any stone unturned to make sure the industry learns from this tragic incident”.

The report also dismisses weather as a contributory factor. The flight was diverting around storms in the area.

Iriyanto and Plessel had over 8,000 hours experience between them. Iriyanto had a decade of experience training other pilots, and previous employers include the air force. They spent three minutes struggling to regain control as the pane fell to the sea. Some bodies were recovered around 1,000km away near Sulawesi.

AFP spoke to Terence Fan, an air industry expert from Singapore Management University, who said “It’s a scenario that has played out in air accidents in the past[…] Pilots are either distracted by a faulty equipment or cannot properly solve the issue and something else is brewing in the background.”

One such accident was the loss of Air France Flight 447 in 2009 into the Atlantic. It was investigated by the BEA of France, which also assisted the AirAsia probe. The BEA issued recommendations on how to train pilots after the Air France crash. Ex-BEA boss Jean-Paul Troadec said to AFP “Several recommendations of the (BEA) on the subject of pilot training were clearly not implemented by [AirAsia].”

Indonesia saw such an accident on New Years’ Day 2007 when Adam Air Flight 574 crashed into the Makasser Strait near Sulawesi. The plane suffered a failure on a navigational instrument. While pilots were troubleshooting for this navigational system they first unintentionally disconnected the autopilot, then lost control and crashed into the sea.



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August 18, 2015

Two pieces of suspected plane debris from Maldives taken to Malaysia for analysis

Two pieces of suspected plane debris from Maldives taken to Malaysia for analysis

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Tuesday, August 18, 2015

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Two pieces of suspected plane debris found washed ashore islands in the Maldives have been taken back to Malaysia for further analysis, Malaysia announced on Sunday. The pieces were found last Friday. Investigators are trying to determine if they’re connected to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370).

“The first thing we have to do is to determine if it is actually of plane material”, said Liow Tiong Lai, Malaysia’s transport minister, during a press conference on Sunday. “The objects have been brought back and the investigation team will determine soon if they are debris of the MH370 plane […] Our team here will confirm if they belong to a plane and if a confirmation is made, the pieces will be sent to the international investigation team to determine if they are from MH370,” he added.

The surface of one of the pieces is flat while the other is constructed of “honeycomb material.” During the press conference, Liow described one the pieces as being “very small, about the size of your hand”.

File photo of suspected plane debris washed ashore Kaafu Atoll on May 31.
Image: Mohamed Wafir (via Facebook).

The debris was reportedly found while authorities were searching Maldives islands for other possible debris. Pieces of debris that resemble a honeycomb material were found on a beach owned by the Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru resort, located in the Maldives island chain Kaafu Atoll. Those pieces are reported to have washed ashore onto the resort island around May 31. The investigation into the Maldives debris began as a result of photos of it being uploaded to the social networking website Facebook. The photos show at least two pieces of debris, both appear to be flat, but at least one is made of a honeycomb material. Initially the debris was disposed of as trash and was reportedly sent to the garbage island Thilafushi, where trash is sorted, exported for recycling, or burned. Reports say at the time the debris was collected, no one suspected it could be from MH370.

Investigators examined several other pieces of debris that washed ashore onto other Maldives locations, the Baa Atoll and the islands of Fehendhoo and Fulhahdhoo, and found none of it was related to an aircraft. “My team has witnessed the debris and most of them are negative. They are not related to MH370 and not even plane material,” said Liow on Friday. Around August 10, Abdulla Rasheed, a captain of a cargo boat which recently capsized in the waters off the Maldives, stated of debris then recently discovered, “From the pictures of the debris found on most of the islands, I can almost certainly say that they are from the cargo we were carrying.” In late July, a piece of a wing known as a flaperon was found washed ashore on Réunion Island. The Malaysian government stated it’s from MH370, but according to Chinese officials, the piece has yet to be confirmed to be from the aircraft.

MH370, while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing, China, vanished without a trace on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldive island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly”, one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim the plane appeared to he headed in the direction of Diego Garcia, but Malaysian authorities have discounted those claims.

“Based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country [Maldives]. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight,” said Malaysia’s transport ministry at the time of the report.



Related news[]

  • “Malaysia: ‘Most’ debris found on Maldives islands not ‘plane material'” — Wikinews, August 14, 2015
  • “Malaysia to investigate suspected plane debris washed ashore on several Maldives islands” — Wikinews, August 10, 2015
  • Suspected plane debris washes ashore on several Maldives islands” — Wikinews, August 9, 2015

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Two pieces of suspected plane debris from Maldives, taken to Malaysia for analysis

Two pieces of suspected plane debris from Maldives, taken to Malaysia for analysis

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Tuesday, August 18, 2015

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Two pieces of suspected plane debris found washed ashore islands in the Maldives, have been taken back to Malaysia for further analysis, Malaysia announced on Sunday. The pieces were found last Friday. Investigators are trying to determine if they’re connected to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370).

“The first thing we have to do is to determine if it is actually of plane material,” said Liow Tiong Lai, Malaysia’s transport minister, during a press conference on Sunday. “The objects have been brought back and the investigation team will determine soon if they are debris of the MH370 plane. Our team here will confirm if they belong to a plane and if a confirmation is made, the pieces will be sent to the international investigation team to determine if they are from MH370,” he added.

The surface of one of the pieces is flat while the other is constructed of “honeycomb material.” During the press conference, Liow described one the pieces as being “very small, about the size of your hand.”

File photo of suspected plane debris washed ashore Kaafu Atoll on May 31.
Image: Mohamed Wafir (via Facebook).

The debris was reportedly found while authorities were searching Maldives islands for other possible debris. The last known pieces of debris that resemble a honeycomb material were found on a beach owned by the Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru resort, located in the Maldives island chain Kaafu Atoll. Those pieces are reported to have washed ashore onto the resort island around May 31. The investigation into the Maldives debris began as a result of photos of it being uploaded to the social networking website Facebook. The photos show at least two pieces of debris, both appear to be flat, but at least one is made of a honeycomb material. Initially the debris was disposed of as trash and was reportedly sent to the garbage island Thilafushi, where trash is sorted, exported for recycling, or burned. Reports say at the time the debris was collected, no one suspected it could be from MH370.

Investigators examined several other pieces of debris that washed ashore onto other Maldives locations, the Baa Atoll, and the islands of Fehendhoo and Fulhahdhoo and found none of it was related to an aircraft. “My team has witnessed the debris and most of them are negative. They are not related to MH370 and not even plane material,” said Liow on Friday. On August 10, Abdulla Rasheed, a captain of a cargo boat which recently capsized in the waters off the Maldives stated, “From the pictures of the debris found on most of the islands, I can almost certainly say that they are from the cargo we were carrying.” On July 29, a piece of a wing known as a flaperon was found washed ashore on Réunion Island. The Malaysian government stated it’s from MH370, but according to Chinese officials, the piece has yet to be confirmed to be from the aircraft.

MH370, while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing, China, vanished without a trace on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldive island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly”, one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim the plane appeared to he headed in the direction of Diego Garcia, but Malaysian authorities have discounted those claims.

“Based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country [Maldives]. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight,” said Malaysia’s transport ministry at the time of the report.



Related news[]

  • “Malaysia: ‘Most’ debris found on Maldives islands not ‘plane material'” — Wikinews, August 14, 2015
  • “Malaysia to investigate suspected plane debris washed ashore on several Maldives islands” — Wikinews, August 10, 2015
  • Suspected plane debris washes ashore on several Maldives islands” — Wikinews, August 9, 2015

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August 13, 2015

More suspected plane debris washes ashore on Maldives island

More suspected plane debris washes ashore on Maldives island

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Thursday, August 13, 2015

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Debris believed to be part of an aircraft has washed ashore on an uninhabited island in the Maldives. The fragment, suspected to be from a wing, was found on Mendhoo island, within the Laamu Atoll. The finding comes after several pieces of suspected plane debris washed ashore on the resort island Vabbinfaru, within the Kaafu Atoll, some of which could be from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370).

The newest piece of debris is white and severely damaged and dented in places. Some of the paint also appears to be peeling off. Authorities have collected the debris, to be examined later. Malaysian officials are currently investigating other debris to determine if they came from an aircraft and if so “discussions will be held to determine the next steps in terms of the process of analysis”, said the Malaysian transport ministry in a statement.

File photo of suspected plane debris that washed ashore the Maldive Kaafu Atoll on May 31.
Image: Mohamed Wafir (via Facebook).

On Tuesday, a team of Malaysian investigators arrived in Maldives to take charge of debris washed ashore on Vabbinfaru on May 31, which had previously been disposed of as trash, and transport it back to Malaysia for further analysis. Malaysia said they believe the debris could be from MH370, but no official confirmation has been made.

“We (Malaysia) have an understanding with the authorities there [the Maldives] […] we think the parts which were found about a month ago were parts of the aircraft,” said Ab Aziz Kaprawi, the deputy transport minister for Malaysia as quoted by Bernama, a Malaysian government news agency. “They have to be further analysed and will be brought back to Malaysia for verification”, he added.

Since the Vabbinfaru incident, debris has washed ashore on at least three other Maldives locations, the Baa Atoll and the islands of Fehendhoo and Fulhahdhoo, but much of it isn’t believed to be from an aircraft. Abdulla Rasheed, a captain of a cargo boat which recently capsized in the waters off the Maldives, stated, “From the pictures of the debris found on most of the islands, I can almost certainly say that they are from the cargo we were carrying.” Despite this possibility, any debris located is being gathered up until Malaysian authorities can examine it.

“We are collecting any unidentified debris and storing them in a warehouse so that the Malaysians can carry out tests and determine if it is from their plane or not,” said the office of the Maldives President in a statement reported by Haveeru Daily before the Malaysian investigators arrived.

MH370, while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing, China, vanished on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldives island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly”, one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim the plane appeared to be headed in the direction of Diego Garcia, but Malaysian authorities have discounted those claims.

“Based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country [Maldives]. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight,” said Malaysia’s transport ministry at the time of the reports.



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August 12, 2015

Malaysia says debris found in Maldives could be from MH370

Malaysia says debris found in Maldives could be from MH370

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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Photo of suspected plane debris that washed ashore the Maldive Kaafu Atoll on May 31.
Image: Mohamed Wafir (via Facebook).

This map displays the location of Reunion Island, because of the debris part found there in 2015-07, in relation to the known flight path of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.
Image: AHeneen.

Malaysian officials stated Wednesday, some of the debris found in the Maldives will be brought back to Malaysia to determine if they are from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370) as they now believe. A team arrived Tuesday in Maldives to take charge of the debris, which had previously been disposed of as trash.

“We [Malaysia] have an understanding with the authorities there [Maldives] …we think the parts which were found about a month ago were parts of the aircraft,” said Ab Aziz Kaprawi, the deputy transport minister for Malaysia as quoted by Bernama, a Malaysian government news agency. “They have to be further analysed and will be brought back to Malaysia for verification,” he added.

“The parts are currently undergoing few processes before they can be released and brought to Malaysia for further identification and verification,” said Seri Liow Tiong Lai, Malaysia’s transport minister during a press conference today. “If it belongs to Boeing 777 then we will have to carry out further analysis and verification,” he added. Malaysia’s Department of Civil Aviation will be in charge of examining the debris once it arrives in the country.

The debris washed ashore the Kaafu Atoll reportedly around May 31 and was recovered by employees of the Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru Resort. However the debris had been disposed of as trash before authorities could examine it. An investigation into the debris was launched after photos of it were uploaded to the social networking service Facebook, by an employee of the resort. The photographs show a large white object, possibly two, stained with algae and appear to be made of a fiberglass and honeycomb material.

Debris has since washed ashore on at least three other Maldives locations, the Baa Atoll, and the islands of Fehendhoo and Fulhahdhoo, but most of it isn’t believed to be from an aircraft. Abdulla Rasheed, a captain of a cargo boat which recently capsized in the waters off the Maldives stated, “From the pictures of the debris found on most of the islands, I can almost certainly say that they are from the cargo we were carrying.” Despite this possibility, any debris located is being gathered up until Malaysian authorities can examine it.

“We are collecting any unidentified debris and storing them in a warehouse so that the Malaysians can carry out tests and determine if it is from their plane or not,” said the office of the Maldives President in a statement reported by Haveeru Daily on Monday.

MH370, while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing, China, vanished on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldives island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly”, one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim the plane appeared to be headed in the direction of Diego Garcia, but Malaysian authorities have discounted those claims.

“Based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country [Maldives]. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight,” said Malaysia’s transport ministry at the time of the report.



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August 10, 2015

Malaysia to investigate suspected plane debris washed ashore several Maldive islands

Malaysia to investigate suspected plane debris washed ashore several Maldive islands

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Monday, August 10, 2015

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After published reports stated suspected plane debris washed up on several Maldives islands, Malaysia has stated it will send a team of investigators to examine it. Investigators are to try to determine if the debris came from a plane before taking any further action.

“I urge all parties to allow for the verification process to take its due course. Once it is determined to be aircraft debris, discussions will be held to determine next steps in terms of the process of analysis. Undue speculation will only stress the families and loved ones, anxiously awaiting news on this matter,” said Liow Tiong Lai, Malaysia’s Transport Minister in a statement.

An investigation into the debris was launched after an photos of the debris were uploaded to the social networking website Facebook on, reportedly, May 31, by an employee of a beach resort. Some of the debris is reported to have washed ashore as early as May 31 and was found on a beach owned by the Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru resort, located in Kaafu Atoll. In the past few days, several other pieces of debris were recovered on at least three other islands. Authorities are trying to determine if it may be part of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370).

Last week, a piece of a wing known as a flaperon was found washed ashore on Réunion Island. The Malaysian government stated it’s from MH370, but according to Chinese officials, the piece has yet to be confirmed to be from MH370 because managers were on leave from the Spanish manufacturer of the part.

However, before most of the debris could be examined, it had already been taken away for disposal. The photographs showed a large white object, possibly two, stained with algae and appear to be made of a fiberglass and honeycomb material. The objects appear to be several feet in length and width and in one photo where the paint is severely peeled, red letters “IC” can be seen. Those pieces, along with others, were taken away and disposed of as trash. When authorities discovered the photographs, they returned to the site, but only found a small, five to seven inch (about 13–18 cm) piece of debris they say doesn’t appear to be part of a plane.

Some of the debris may not be from a plane. Abdulla Rasheed, a captain of a cargo boat which recently capsized in the waters off the Maldives stated, “From the pictures of the debris found on most of the islands, I can almost certainly say that they are from the cargo we were carrying”. Despite this possibility, any debris located is being gathered up and stored in a warehouse until Malaysian authorities can examine it.

“We are collecting any unidentified debris and storing them in a warehouse so that the Malaysians can carry out tests and determine if it is from their plane or not,” said the office of the Maldives President in a statement reported by Haveeru Daily.

MH370, while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing, China, vanished without a trace on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldive island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly”, one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim the plane appeared to he headed in the direction of Diego Garcia, but Malaysian authorities have discounted those claims.

“Based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country [Maldives]. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight,” said Malaysia’s transport ministry at the time of the report.



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August 9, 2015

Suspected plane debris washes ashore on several Maldives islands

Suspected plane debris washes ashore on several Maldives islands

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Sunday, August 9, 2015

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Location of Kaafu Atoll within the Maldives.
Image: TUBS.

Authorities are investigating what’s left of debris believed to belong to a plane, that washed ashore several small islands in the Maldives. The investigation began as a result of photos of the debris being uploaded to the social networking website Facebook. Some of the debris is reported to have washed ashore as early as May 31 and was found on a beach owned by the Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru resort, located in Kaafu Atoll. In the past few days, several other pieces of debris were recovered on at least three other islands. Authorities are trying to determine if it may be part of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370). Last week, a piece of a wing known as a flaperon, reported to be from MH370, was found washed ashore on Réunion Island.

Pictures taken of the objects recovered in the Maldives on, reportedly, May 31, were posted to Facebook by an employee of the resort. That prompted authorities to launch an investigation into the debris, but before it could be examined, it had already been sent away for disposal. The photographs show a large white object, possibly two, stained with algae and appear to be made of a fiberglass and honeycomb material. The objects appear to be several feet in length and width and in one photo where the paint is severely peeled, red letters “IC” can be seen. Those pieces, along with others, were taken away and disposed of as trash. When authorities discovered the photographs, they returned to the site, but only found a small, five to seven inch (about 13–18 cm) piece of debris they say doesn’t appear to be part of a plane.

According to the resort’s manager Mr. Naseem, the bigger pieces of debris and other waste were taken away and disposed of in the usual way. He added other forms of debris and trash with no value, such as buoys and suspected military waste, wash up on the islands all the time, especially during monsoon season. Local residents and resort workers regularly collect trash which is sent to the garbage island Thilafushi where it’s sorted, exported for recycling, or burned. Reports say at the time the debris was collected, no one suspected it could be from MH370.

“Although some of it was taken to Thilafushi, there is still a five or a seven inch piece on the resort. It was left because it is small. The management has decided to hand it over to the Police”, said an unnamed official to SunOnline, who said authorities don’t know if any of the debris taken away has been destroyed. The Serious and Organized Crime Unit of the Maldives Police Service and experts from the Maldives Civil Aviation Authority are heading the investigation.

Yesterday, reports stated several more pieces of debris, one piece measuring some eight feet by two feet (about 2.4 by 0.6 m), were found on Baa Atoll, Fehendhoo and Fulhahdhoo and washed ashore sometime in the past few days. One piece appears to have a serial number on the side, possibly reading ‘021411270507.’ Initially residents who found the debris took it home. “A resident had found the debris and taken it home. Nobody had thought twice about it then. When he heard about the discovery in Vabbinfaru resort we immediately called the Police,” said Mohamed Ibrahim, a councilman for Fehendhoo Island, to Haveeru Daily.

MH370, while flying from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia to Beijing, China, vanished without a trace on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldive island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly”, one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim the plane appeared to he headed in the direction of Diego Garcia.

According to The Huffington Post, Haveeru reported the witnesses were interviewed by authorities who deemed their statements to be truthful, but Maldive military officials along with Malaysian officials say no such aircraft was in Maldive airspace at the time MH370 went missing. “Based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country [Maldives]. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight”, said Malaysian Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein.



Sources[]

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August 7, 2015

Debris suspected to be from plane, washed up on a Maldives island in May

Debris suspected to be from plane, washed up on a Maldives island in May

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Friday, August 7, 2015

Aviation

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Location of Kaafu Atoll within the Maldives.
Image: TUBS.

Authorities are now investigating what’s left of debris believed to belong to a plane, that washed ashore a small island in the Maldives, after photos were uploaded to the social networking website Facebook. The debris is reported to have washed ashore around May 31 on a beach owned by the Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru resort, located on the small island of Kaafu Atoll. Authorities are trying to determine if it may be part of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370). Last week, a piece of a wing known as a flaperon reported to be from MH370, was found washed ashore on Réunion Island.

Pictures posted to Facebook by an employee of the resort, show some of the pieces before being sent away for disposal. They show a large white object, possibly two, possibly stained with algae and appear to be made of a fiberglass and honeycomb material. The objects appear to be several feet in length and width and in one photo where the paint is severely peeled, red letters “IC” can be seen. Those pieces, along with others, were taken away and disposed of as trash. Authorities investigating what’s left of the debris, a small five to seven inch piece say it doesn’t appear to be part of a plane. The Serious and Organized Crime Unit of the Maldives Police Service and experts from the Maldives Civil Aviation Authority are heading the investigation.

According to the resort’s manage Mr. Naseem, the bigger pieces of debris and other waste, were taken away and “disposed like any other debris. People just dispose them off.” He added other forms of debris and trash with no value, such as buoys and suspected military waste, wash up on the islands all the time, especially during monsoon season. Local residents and resort workers regularly collect trash which is sent to the garbage island Thilafushi where it’s sorted, exported for recycling or burned. Reports say at the time the debris was collected, no one suspected it could’ve been from MH370.

“Although some of it was taken to Thilafushi, there is still a five or a seven inch piece on the resort. It was left because it is small. The management has decided to hand it over to the Police,” said an unnamed official to SunOnline. Authorities don’t know if any of the debris taken away, has been destroyed.

MH370 vanished without a trace on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldive island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly,” one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim plane appeared to he headed in the direction of Diego Garcia.

According to The Huffington Post Haveeru reported the witnesses were interviewed by authorities who deemed their statements to be truthful, but Maldive military officials along with Malaysian officials, say no such aircraft was in their airspace, above their waters at the time MH370 went missing.

A statement issued by the Malaysian Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein states, “based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight.”



Sources[]

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Authorities investigate suspected plane debris that washed ashore a Maldives island in May

Authorities investigate suspected plane debris that washed ashore a Maldives island in May

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, August 7, 2015

Aviation

HA-1112-M1L Buchon C4K-102 flying.jpg
Related articles
Collaborate!
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  • Writing an article

Location of Kaafu Atoll within the Maldives.
Image: TUBS.

Authorities are now investigating what’s left of debris believed to belong to a plane, that washed ashore several small islands in the Maldives, after photos were uploaded to the social networking website Facebook. The initial debris is reported to have washed ashore around May 31 and was found on a beach owned by the Banyan Tree Vabbinfaru resort, located on the small island of Kaafu Atoll. In the past few days, several other pieces of debris washed ashore at least two other islands. Authorities are trying to determine if it may be part of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370). Last week, a piece of a wing known as a flaperon reported to be from MH370, was found washed ashore on Réunion Island.

Pictures taken of the objects on May 31 were posted to Facebook by an employee of the resort and show some of the pieces found on the resort beach before being sent away for disposal. They show a large white object, possibly two, possibly stained with algae and appear to be made of a fiberglass and honeycomb material. The objects appear to be several feet in length and width and in one photo where the paint is severely peeled, red letters “IC” can be seen. Those pieces, along with others, were taken away and disposed of as trash. Authorities investigating what’s left of the debris, a small five to seven inch piece say it doesn’t appear to be part of a plane.

On August 8, reports stated several more pieces of debris, one piece measuring over 8 feet long and 5 feet wide, were found on Baa Atoll, Fehendhoo and Fulhahdhoo and washed ashore sometime in the past few days. One piece appears to have a serial number on the side, possibly reading ‘021411278507.’ Initially residents who found the debris, took it home. “”A resident had found the debris and taken it home. Nobody had thought twice about it then. When he heard about the discovery in Vabbinfaru resort we immediately called the Police,” said Mohamed Ibrahim, a councilman for Fehendhoo Island to Haveeru Daily.

The Serious and Organized Crime Unit of the Maldives Police Service and experts from the Maldives Civil Aviation Authority are heading the investigation.

According to the resort’s manage Mr. Naseem, the bigger pieces of debris and other waste, were taken away and “disposed like any other debris. People just dispose them off.” He added other forms of debris and trash with no value, such as buoys and suspected military waste, wash up on the islands all the time, especially during monsoon season. Local residents and resort workers regularly collect trash which is sent to the garbage island Thilafushi where it’s sorted, exported for recycling or burned. Reports say at the time the debris was collected, no one suspected it could’ve been from MH370.

“Although some of it was taken to Thilafushi, there is still a five or a seven inch piece on the resort. It was left because it is small. The management has decided to hand it over to the Police,” said an unnamed official to SunOnline. Authorities don’t know if any of the debris taken away, has been destroyed.

MH370 vanished without a trace on March 8, 2014. All 239 passengers and crew are believed to be dead. On the day the plane went missing, residents on the small Maldive island of Kudahuvadhoo claimed to have seen a very “low flying jumbo jet” crash into the Indian Ocean. Some also noted the colors appeared to resemble that of a Malaysia Airlines plane. “I’ve never seen a jet flying so low over our island before. We’ve seen seaplanes, but I’m sure that this was not one of those. I could even make out the doors on the plane clearly,” one resident was quoted as saying to the newspaper Haveeru Daily. Some claim plane appeared to he headed in the direction of Diego Garcia.

According to The Huffington Post Haveeru reported the witnesses were interviewed by authorities who deemed their statements to be truthful, but Maldive military officials along with Malaysian officials, say no such aircraft was in their airspace, above their waters at the time MH370 went missing.

A statement issued by the Malaysian Transport Minister Hishamuddin Hussein at the time stated, “based on the monitoring up to date, no indication of Flight MH370 has been observed on any military radars in the country [Maldives]. Furthermore, the data of radars at Maldives airports have also been analysed and shows no indication of the said flight.”



Sources[]

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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