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December 9, 2015

Donald Trump maintains Muslims should face US ban

Donald Trump maintains Muslims should face US ban

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Wednesday, December 9, 2015

2016 United States Presidential Election
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2016 U.S. Presidential Election stories

A petition has been signed by over 200,000 people urging Donald Trump, who is the front runner to become the Republican Party’s candidate for President of the United States, to be banned from entering the United Kingdom. This follows Mr Trump’s comments that Muslims should be blocked from entering the US. Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, has also removed Trump from his role as business ambassador for Scotland.

Donald Trump defended his policy on Tuesday of banning Muslims from the US
Image: Gage Skidmore.

On Monday, Mr Trump said he wants a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the US” until the country can understand “what is going on” with regard to terrorism. He said in his statement that a large number of Muslims show “great hatred towards Americans”.

On Tuesday, Trump reinforced this belief when speaking on Good Morning America, saying America has “no choice but to do this”.

Trump’s comments on Monday came three days after a shooting in San Bernardino, California by Syed Rizwan Farook and his wife Tashfeen Malik, in which fourteen people were killed. US President Barack Obama said in an address from the Oval Office on Sunday the attack was an act of terrorism.

Donald Trump’s statement has been widely criticised, including by members of his own political party. Republican Matt Moore said the policy is a “bad idea” and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, who is running against Trump to become Presdiential candidate, said “this is not Conservatism”.

Democrat candidate for President Hillary Clinton described Trump’s comments as “Shameful”. Secretary of State John Kerry argued Trump’s statement could be detrimental in the ongoing fight against Islamic State (IS), saying his remarks were “not constructive”.

Trump argued that his policy idea is “no different” to that of former President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s policy which saw Japanese deportations from the US and the confinement of Japanese people within US camps following Japan’s attacks on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Mr Trump also said the policy should not be implemented on Muslims currently living within the US.

Kassem Allie from the Islamic Center of America, accused Trump of evoking fear “reminiscent of Nazi Germany and Stalin“. US Secretarty of Homeland Security said Mr Trump’s comments could adversely impact on US security. The Pentagon was also concerned that Trump’s demands could be counterproductive in the fight against, arguing it “bolsters Isil’s narrative”.

Mr Trump also said on Tuesday that police in London are “afraid for their lives” in some areas because of radicalisation in the city. These comments were rebuffed by the United Kingdom Prime Minister David Cameron who said Trump was “simply wrong” and Mayor of London Boris Johnson said the claim was “ridiculous”.



Sources[]

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Petition calls for Trump UK ban

Petition calls for Trump UK ban – Wikinews, the free news source

Petition calls for Trump UK ban

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Wednesday, December 9, 2015

2016 United States presidential election
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A petition reached over 300,000 signatures today urging Donald Trump, considered the front runner to become the Republican Party‘s candidate for President of the United States, be banned from entering the United Kingdom. This follows Mr Trump’s comments that Muslims should be blocked from entering the US.

Donald Trump defended his policy on Tuesday of banning Muslims from the US
Image: Gage Skidmore.

Also, Scotland‘s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, removed Trump from his role as business ambassador for Scotland.

On Monday, Mr Trump said he wants a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the US” until the country can understand “what the hell is going on” with regard to terrorism. He said in a statement that a large number of Muslims show “great hatred towards Americans”.

Trump’s comments on Monday came days after a shooting in San Bernardino, California by Syed Rizwan Farook and his wife Tashfeen Malik, in which fourteen people were killed. US President Barack Obama said in an address from the Oval Office on Sunday the attack was an act of terrorism.

Donald Trump’s statement has been widely criticised, including by members of his own political party. Republican Matt Moore said the policy is a “bad idea” and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan said “this is not Conservatism”.

Democrat candidate for President Hillary Clinton described Trump’s comments as “shameful”. Secretary of State John Kerry argued Trump’s statement would not help in the ongoing fight against Islamic State (IS), saying his remarks were “not constructive”.

Trump argued that his policy idea is “no different” to that of former President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s policy which saw large-scale confinement of Japanese US citizens in internment camps following Japan’s attacks on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Mr Trump also said the policy should not be implemented on Muslims currently living within the US.

Kassem Allie from the Islamic Center of America, accused Trump of evoking fear “reminiscent of Nazi Germany and Stalin“. The Pentagon expressed concern Trump’s demands could be counterproductive in the fight against IS, saying it “bolsters Isil’s narrative”.

Mr Trump also said on Tuesday that police in London are “afraid for their lives” in some areas because of radicalisation in the city. These comments were rebuffed by the United Kingdom Prime Minister David Cameron who said Trump was “simply wrong” and Mayor of London Boris Johnson said the claim was “ridiculous”.



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 20, 2015

Wikinews interviews Mark Everson, U.S. Republican Party presidential candidate

Wikinews interviews Mark Everson, U.S. Republican Party presidential candidate

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Thursday, August 20, 2015

2016 United States Presidential Election
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2016 U.S. Presidential Election stories

File photo of Mark Everson
Image: U.S. Government.

Former U.S. Commissioner of Internal Revenue Mark Everson took some time to talk with Wikinews about his campaign for the U.S. Republican Party’s 2016 presidential nomination.

Everson served as Commissioner of Internal Revenue, the administrative head of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) from 2003 to 2007, during the George W. Bush administration. After his departure, he briefly served as CEO of the American Red Cross, worked in the cabinet of Indiana governor Mitch Daniels, and worked for the tax consulting firm alliantgroup. He announced his candidacy this past March with a sixteen-page open letter in which he outlined the six pillars of his campaign: amnesty for illegal immigrants, reinstatement of the military draft, a promise to serve only a single presidential term, and calls for tax reform, deficit reduction, and corporate responsibility.

He was excluded from the August 6 Fox News Republican presidential debate and has been excluded from most presidential polls. However, he is listed on the Republican Party’s website as one of 18 candidates and filed a Federal Election Commission (FEC) complaint against Fox News for his exclusion from the August 6 debate.

With Wikinews reporter William S. Saturn‎, Everson discusses his 2016 campaign, the media blackout of his campaign, and his views on the presidency and the possible Everson administration.

Interview[]

2016 campaign and qualifications[]

  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWilliam S. SaturnWikinews waves Right.png Why run for president? Why not run for a lower office that you might be more likely to win and effect change?
Wikinews waves Left.pngMark EversonWikinews waves Right.png The electorate is very unsettled. Americans are fed up with politics as usual, so there is a clear path for a nontraditional candidate. I have extensive private sector experience and know the government inside out, but do not carry the political baggage of ties to special interest groups. I have lived in nine states. As a result, I have seen and know America well, but do not have the deep ties to a particular state or community that would traditionally be associated with seeking a different office.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png What qualifications do you have that will assist you in executing the duties of president?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png While I have not held elective office, my public service credentials meet or exceed those of many of the candidates in the race. My federal executive branch experience (at USIA, DOJ, OMB, and the Treasury) is greater than that of any candidate in the GOP contest. I managed the nation’s immigration system under President Reagan, and in the administration of President George W. Bush was instrumental in the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and directed the nation’s tax system as Commissioner of Internal Revenue. Immigration, homeland security and taxes are issues of critical importance to the country and central to the 2016 election.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png How much campaigning have you done so far?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png I have campaigned in 26 counties across Iowa and also made campaign stops in New Hampshire. I have been interviewed on radio shows across the country.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png What are your thoughts on your fellow Republican presidential candidates?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png I think it is a strong field and that the vigorous policy debate underway in the party is good for the country.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png Would you ever consider running as a third party or independent candidate?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png I am running as a Republican and am not contemplating a third party or independent candidacy.

Media blackout[]

  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png Wikinews covered the complaint you filed with the FEC against Fox News in your attempt to be included in the August 6 Debate. In our report, Election Law expert Richard Winger suggested you file a lawsuit rather than an FEC complaint. Do you have an update on your FEC complaint and might you consider filing a lawsuit if you are excluded from future debates?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png We have received notice that the FEC has filed the complaint with Fox News, but nothing else. I have written to CNN and the Reagan Foundation requesting inclusion in their September debate. At this time I do not expect to file a lawsuit on this matter.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png What is your response to Mr. Winger, who said you had a good case and may have had an opportunity to gain access to the debate if you filed a lawsuit instead of an FEC complaint?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png I did look into the possible filing of a law suit and was informed by a prominent election law expert that the chances were quite slim that the courts would intervene in a matter properly before the FEC.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png Are you saying that you do not expect to litigate the Fox News matter or do you not expect to file a lawsuit to gain access to future debates? If so, why?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png I expect to pursue the FOX matter with the FEC. I will assess future legal actions as events unfold.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png Your exclusion from National presidential polls appears to be the biggest detriment to your campaign and effort to appear in debates. Is there anything your campaign can do to include your name in polls to qualify for future debates?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png We have written the polling companies requesting that I be included in the polls.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png Have the polling companies responded to your requests? If so, what have they said?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png We have not yet heard from the polling companies.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png Are you surprised by your exclusion from presidential polls and events or did you expect this when you announced?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png At this still early stage of the race, I am surprised that participation has been limited to established politicians and individuals already enjoying significant name recognition. The process should be about surfacing issues of importance to the country and who can best tackle the challenges at hand.

The presidency and administration[]

  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png What are your thoughts on the job Barack Obama has done as president? Specifically, what would you have done differently?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png The president has failed to unite the nation, the government is not operating well in any number of areas, and the world is certainly a more dangerous place than when he took office. My main objection to his term in office extends beyond his policy choices to his unprecedented expansion of executive power. I have a track record of implementing the law as written, not as I might wish it to be. The powers of the presidency are significant, but limited under our constitution.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png If elected, what would constitute a successful presidency for you?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png The specifics include a rewrite of the tax code to take 150 million Americans off the income tax rolls; holding Wall Street and the big banks accountable to following the law, and taking regulatory actions to increase lending; institution of a program of national service; real, balanced reforms to our entitlement programs to assure their continued viability; rewriting our immigration laws to control our borders and reinforce our tradition of assimilation; and taking reelection politics out of Oval Office decision-making by serving only a single term. More broadly, I would consider an Everson presidency successful if we restore faith in our government at home and abroad, and Americans once again put national interests ahead of self-interest.
  • Wikinews waves Left.pngWSSWikinews waves Right.png Which individuals would you like to see in an Everson administration?
Wikinews waves Left.pngEversonWikinews waves Right.png I know many qualified individuals who would do an excellent job serving the nation, but believe it serves no purpose to disclose particular names at this early date.



Related news[]

Sources[]

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 16, 2015

\”Birther King\” announces campaign for U.S. president

“Birther King” announces campaign for U.S. president

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Via press release Friday, Andy Martin, a perennial candidate for political office and self-proclaimed “Birther King” announced that he is seeking the U.S. Republican Party’s 2016 presidential nomination, his fourth bid for the White House. In his announcement and subsequent release, Martin expresses a desire to participate in Republican presidential debates and aligns himself with fellow Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Additionally, he outlines six reasons for running, including degrading the candidacy of former Florida governor Jeb Bush, who is also seeking the Republican nomination.

“Birther King” Andy Martin.
Image: Andy Martin.

“I have been a loyal Republican,” says Martin in his announcement, “loyal to the principles of our party but not necessarily loyal to some of its failed leaders.”

Martin, best known for spreading multiple conspiracy theories concerning the birth and religion of U.S. President Barack Obama, previously ran for the Democratic Party presidential nomination in 1988, and unsuccessfully sought the backing of the Republican Party in 2000 and 2012. In 2012, he received a total of 19 votes in the New Hampshire Primary, the only primary ballot on which he appeared.

For 2016, Martin does not harbor high expectations of electoral success, though he hopes to receive an invitation to the debates. In reference to the seventeen candidates invited to the two August 6 Fox News debates, Martin casts himself as the “eighteenth candidate,” willing to participate in the second tier debate. Moreover, he declares himself as the “second-most exciting” candidate, reserving first place for Trump, whom Martin praises throughout his announcement. Despite having described Trump’s previous foray into politics as a “charade” during a 2011 interview with Wikinews, Martin now sees himself as Trump’s “tag team” partner in attacking the Bush candidacy.

“Trump has the raw media power to weaken Bush,” says Martin, “I have the negative information and hardball media tactics to make Bush a toxic candidate for the Republican base.”

Martin adamantly opposes Bush because of the foreign policy of the candidate’s brother, former President George W. Bush. He also criticizes Bush for his alleged economic benefit from the collapse of Lehman Brothers, labeling Bush as a “front man for a handful of corrupt plutocrats that have raped [the nation’s] economy.” Martin has previously criticized the Bush family during his 2000 campaign, when he ran television ads accusing then-presidential candidate George W. Bush of abusing cocaine and alcohol.

In addition to preventing Bush from gaining the Republican nomination, Martin intends to focus his campaign on protecting the prestige of the New Hampshire Primary and Iowa Caucus, defending the economic legacy of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, combating political correctness, emphasizing U.S. relations with Greece, and fighting political corruption.

Martin filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission last month to run for president in 2016 officially. He joins 139 Republican Party presidential candidates who have done likewise.



Related news[]

Sources[]

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

\”Birther King\” announces 2016 campaign for U.S. president

“Birther King” announces 2016 campaign for U.S. president

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
(Redirected from “Birther King” announces campaign for U.S. president)
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Via press release Friday, Andy Martin, a perennial candidate for political office and self-proclaimed “Birther King” announced that he is seeking the U.S. Republican Party’s 2016 presidential nomination, his fourth bid for the White House. In his announcement and subsequent release, Martin expresses a desire to participate in Republican presidential debates and aligns himself with fellow Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Additionally, he outlines six reasons for running, including degrading the candidacy of former Florida governor Jeb Bush, who is also seeking the Republican nomination.

“Birther King” Andy Martin.
Image: Andy Martin.

“I have been a loyal Republican,” says Martin in his announcement, “loyal to the principles of our party but not necessarily loyal to some of its failed leaders.”

Martin, best known for spreading multiple conspiracy theories concerning the birth and religion of U.S. President Barack Obama, previously ran for the Democratic Party presidential nomination in 1988, and unsuccessfully sought the backing of the Republican Party in 2000 and 2012. In 2012, he received a total of 19 votes in the New Hampshire Primary, the only primary ballot on which he appeared.

For 2016, Martin does not harbor high expectations of electoral success, though he hopes to receive an invitation to the debates. In reference to the seventeen candidates invited to the two August 6 Fox News debates, Martin casts himself as the “eighteenth candidate,” willing to participate in the second tier debate. Moreover, he declares himself as the “second-most exciting” candidate, reserving first place for Trump, whom Martin praises throughout his announcement. Despite having described Trump’s previous foray into politics as a “charade” during a 2011 interview with Wikinews, Martin now sees himself as Trump’s “tag team” partner in attacking the Bush candidacy.

“Trump has the raw media power to weaken Bush,” says Martin, “I have the negative information and hardball media tactics to make Bush a toxic candidate for the Republican base.”

Martin adamantly opposes Bush because of the foreign policy of the candidate’s brother, former President George W. Bush. He also criticizes Bush for his alleged economic benefit from the collapse of Lehman Brothers, labeling Bush as a “front man for a handful of corrupt plutocrats that have raped [the nation’s] economy.” Martin has previously criticized the Bush family during his 2000 campaign, when he ran television ads accusing then-presidential candidate George W. Bush of abusing cocaine and alcohol.

In addition to preventing Bush from gaining the Republican nomination, Martin intends to focus his campaign on protecting the prestige of the New Hampshire Primary and Iowa Caucus, defending the economic legacy of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, combating political correctness, emphasizing U.S. relations with Greece, and fighting political corruption.

Martin filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission last month to run for president in 2016 officially. He joins 139 Republican Party presidential candidates who have done likewise.



Related news[]

Sources[]

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

\’Birther King\’ announces 2016 campaign for U.S. president

‘Birther King’ announces 2016 campaign for U.S. president

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, August 16, 2015

2016 United States Presidential Election
Seal of the President of the United States.svg
2016 U.S. Presidential Election stories

Via press release on Friday, Andy Martin, a perennial candidate for political office and self-proclaimed “Birther King”, announced he is seeking the U.S. Republican Party’s 2016 presidential nomination, his fourth bid for the White House. In his announcement and subsequent release, Martin expresses a desire to participate in Republican presidential debates and aligns himself with fellow Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Additionally, he outlines six reasons for running, including degrading the candidacy of former Florida governor Jeb Bush, who is also seeking the Republican nomination.

“Birther King” Andy Martin.
Image: Andy Martin.

“I have been a loyal Republican,” says Martin in his announcement, “loyal to the principles of our party but not necessarily loyal to some of its failed leaders.”

Martin, best known for spreading multiple conspiracy theories concerning the birth and religion of U.S. President Barack Obama, previously ran for the Democratic Party presidential nomination in 1988, and unsuccessfully sought the backing of the Republican Party in 2000 and 2012. In 2012, he received a total of 19 votes in the New Hampshire Primary, the only primary ballot on which he appeared.

For 2016, Martin does not harbor high expectations of electoral success, though he hopes to receive an invitation to the debates. In reference to the seventeen candidates invited to the two August 6 Fox News debates, Martin casts himself as the “eighteenth candidate,” willing to participate in the second-tier debate. Moreover, he declares himself as the “second-most exciting” candidate, reserving first place for Trump, whom Martin praises throughout his announcement. Although he described Trump’s previous foray into politics as a “charade” during a 2011 interview with Wikinews, Martin now sees himself as Trump’s “tag team” partner in attacking the Bush candidacy.

“Trump has the raw media power to weaken Bush,” says Martin, “I have the negative information and hardball media tactics to make Bush a toxic candidate for the Republican base.”

Martin adamantly opposes Bush because of the foreign policy of the candidate’s brother, former President George W. Bush. He also criticizes Bush for his alleged economic benefit from the collapse of Lehman Brothers, labeling Bush as a “front man for a handful of corrupt plutocrats that have raped [the nation’s] economy.” Martin has previously criticized the Bush family during his 2000 campaign, when he ran television ads accusing then-presidential candidate George W. Bush of abusing cocaine and alcohol.

In addition to preventing Bush from gaining the Republican nomination, Martin intends to focus his campaign on protecting the prestige of the New Hampshire Primary and Iowa Caucus, defending the economic legacy of Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, combating political correctness, emphasizing U.S. relations with Greece, and fighting political corruption.

Martin filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission last month to run for president in 2016 officially. He joins 139 other Republican Party presidential candidates who have done likewise.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 5, 2015

U.S. presidential candidate Mark Everson challenges debate exclusion

U.S. presidential candidate Mark Everson challenges debate exclusion

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Wednesday, August 5, 2015

U.S. Republican Party presidential candidate Mark Everson, former commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), filed a complaint on Monday with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) to challenge his exclusion from Thursday’s first Fox News Republican Party presidential debate. Everson argues his exclusion violates Title 11 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations in that debate hosts must not “structure the debates to promote or advance one candidate over another”, and must “use pre-established objective criteria to determine which candidates may participate in a debate.”

File photo of Mark Everson
Image: U.S. Government.

Everson served as Commissioner of the IRS from 2003 to 2007, during the George W. Bush administration. After his departure, he briefly served as CEO of the American Red Cross, worked in the cabinet of Indiana governor Mitch Daniels, and worked for the tax consulting firm alliantgroup. He announced his candidacy this past March with a sixteen-page open letter in which he outlined the six pillars of his campaign: amnesty for illegal immigrants, reinstatement of the military draft, a promise to serve only a single presidential term, and calls for tax reform, deficit reduction, and corporate responsibility.

Fox News claims Everson fails to meet the criteria it established for Thursday’s two debates. Only seventeen candidates meet the criteria, which require a candidate “consistently” be included in “recognized” opinion polls. The prime-time event features the top ten candidates by average polling percentage. The other seven participate in a separate debate just before the prime time event.

In his complaint, Everson urges the FEC to compel Fox News to include him in the second tier debate as the eighth participant.

Everson argues Fox News, in violation of Title 11, “structure[d] the debates to promote or advance one candidate over another” through a July 27 change to its criteria that replaced a pre-existing one percent polling threshold with a threshold admitting those “consistently” included in “recognized” polls. He alleges this was done to ensure the inclusion of the low-polling candidates former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina, former New York governor George Pataki, Senator Lindsey Graham, and former Virginia governor Jim Gilmore, because Fox News recognizes these candidates as “major players.”

Furthermore, Everson argues the Fox News criteria are not “objective,” as Title 11 requires, because they fail to define the terms “consistently” and “recognized” when referring to polls. He asserts he was included in the Republican Party’s online straw poll in May and is the only candidate still listed on that poll who has been excluded from Thursday’s debate.

Election law expert Richard Winger, publisher of Ballot Access News, says Everson is “completely correct” in his challenge. However, he believes Everson only has a chance of success if he actually files a lawsuit rather than simply complaining to the FEC.



Sources[]

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 29, 2011

U.S. presidential candidate Gary Johnson leaves GOP to vie for the LP nom

U.S. presidential candidate Gary Johnson leaves GOP to vie for the LP nom

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Thursday, December 29, 2011

Gary Johnson in January 2011.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

Former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson ended his campaign for the Republican Party (GOP) presidential nomination to seek the backing of the Libertarian Party (LP). Johnson made the announcement yesterday during a press conference in Santa Fe. He remarked that it “was both a difficult decision – and an easy one…I have a lot of Republican history, and a lot of Republican supporters. But in the final analysis…I am a Libertarian – that is someone who is fiscally very conservative but holds freedom-based positions on the issues that govern our personal behavior.”

Johnson, who supports abortion rights, gay marriage, and marijuana legalization, had trouble gaining support for his GOP candidacy. He remained low in the polls and was invited to only two of the fifteen presidential debates. His name was often not included in surveys, and he filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission after his exclusion from the November 12 CBS debate. He criticized the GOP establishment for failing to support his efforts. A switch to the LP had been expected for Johnson who argued that “the [GOP] process was not fair and open.”

Democratic strategist Stanley Greenberg argued that “almost any third party helps [President Barack] Obama.” A recent poll from Public Policy Polling shows Johnson with nine percent national support in a three-way race with Obama and GOP candidate Mitt Romney. Johnson’s presence in the poll erases Romney’s two percent lead in a head-to-head match up with Obama, giving the president a two point edge. Johnson’s 20 to 23 percent support in his home state of New Mexico splits the vote to give Obama an easy victory in the state.

Nevertheless, Johnson seems to believe he can win. In his announcement, he pointed to a survey showing that “sixty three percent of Americans said they wished there was a third choice for 2012.” He maintains that he is that choice.

Johnson joins the field of nine candidates currently seeking the LP nomination including National Guard officer R.J. Harris and Libertarian activist R. Lee Wrights. The party will hold its nominating convention on May 5.



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November 27, 2011

GOP presidential candidate Gary Johnson considers Libertarian Party run

GOP presidential candidate Gary Johnson considers Libertarian Party run

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Sunday, November 27, 2011

Gary Johnson in January 2011.
Image: Gage Skidmore.

Former New Mexico governor and current Republican Party (GOP) presidential candidate Gary Johnson is reportedly considering a run for the Libertarian Party (LP) presidential nomination. Johnson feels “abandoned by the Republican Party”, he told The Santa Fe New Mexican, due to his exclusion from nine of the eleven GOP debates and believes the LP would give him a fair shot at their nomination.

Johnson espouses libertarian views including marijuana legalization and defense budget cuts, which often run afoul of the GOP mainstream. Earlier this month, after filing suit with the Federal Election Commission and Federal Communication Commission for his exclusion from the November 12 CBS debate, he chastised the GOP establishment for failing to support him. The GOP agreed with the debate’s inclusion criteria, which turned back candidates with less than three percent support in the Real Clear Politics average and third quarter fundraising receipts below US$1 million.

Johnson raised a little under US$240,000 in the third quarter and lately has not even been included in polls. He did appear in an August CNN poll, in which he led former Senator Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania and former Utah governor Jon Huntsman. Despite their standing, both Santorum and Huntsman have been invited to every debate.

Johnson believes his exclusion was a “boardroom decision” to protect the GOP’s “status quo.” But Republican party attorney John R. Phillippe Jr. says that without a minimum standard, “the debates would be utter chaos and unhelpful to Republican voters”.

If Johnson decides to leave the GOP and seek the LP nomination, it would not be the first time a member of the Republican Party did so. In 2008, former Republican Congressman Bob Barr ran and was selected as the LP nominee. In the general election, he garnered 0.4 percent of the popular vote.

For 2012, the LP has achieved ballot access in all 50 states, and currently has nine presidential candidates, including National Guard officer R.J. Harris and Libertarian activist R. Lee Wrights.



Related news

  • “Wikinews interviews U.S. Libertarian Party presidential candidate R. Lee Wrights” — Wikinews, June 20, 2011
  • “Wikinews interviews U.S. Libertarian Party potential presidential candidate R.J. Harris” — Wikinews, June 17, 2011
  • Bob Barr wins the Libertarian Party presidential nomination” — Wikinews, May 28, 2008

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August 9, 2011

U.S. Presidential candidate Fred Karger denied place at Fox News debate

U.S. Presidential candidate Fred Karger denied place at Fox News debate

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Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Fred Karger in 2010.
Image: IowaPolitics.com.

Fred Karger, the first openly gay person to seek the presidential nomination of a major U.S. political party, was denied a place at Thursday’s Fox News-sponsored Republican Party debate in Iowa. Karger insists that he meets the requirement of polling an average of one percent in at least five recent national polls, but Fox News refutes his claim.

Karger, who previously served as an adviser to Presidents Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, announced his candidacy earlier this year. He brands himself as “a different kind of Republican” that wants to open the party to outsiders like himself. However, his polling numbers have remained low.

For inclusion in the debate, Karger cites an August 4 Harris poll that shows him with two percent support, an April 28 Fox News poll and Zogby polls from May 23 and July 25 that show one percent support, combined with a June 29 McClathy-Marist poll that includes Karger with less than one percent support for an overall average of one percent in five polls. Fox News’ vice president of news Michael Clemente disputes this finding and remarked to the Des Moines Register that the April 28 poll cited was no longer considered recent and that the polls used were not sufficient to fulfill the requirements.

In response, Karger tweeted “I am mad as hell and I am not going to take it any more…We will not be treated differently any more.” He claims that Fox News did not specify which polls could not be included in the criteria. He opened a website titled “Let Fred In!” and supporters have started a petition to Fox News. The filing deadline for the debate is scheduled to end today at 4 p.m. CDT. If Karger is not included, he plans to file a complaint with the Federal Election Commission.

The debate, which will be held two days before the nonbinding Ames Straw Poll, is expected to include Mitt Romney, Michele Bachmann, Tim Pawlenty, Jon Huntsman, Jr., Herman Cain, Ron Paul, and Newt Gingrich. Like Karger, Congressman Thaddeus McCotter was not invited to the debate, despite securing a spot on the straw poll ballot.



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