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March 24, 2009

Kangaroos escape in France

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Kangaroos escape in France

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Tuesday, March 24, 2009

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Macropus rufus, Kangaroo
Image: Lilly M .

Three of fifteen escaped kangaroos are still on the loose in southern France after vandals broke open cages in an Australian-themed park, letting the kangaroos loose.

“When we arrived on Saturday morning, five pens had been broken open, their padlocks were smashed and the perimeter fence was torn in several places,” said Carole Masson, the owner of the park which is located in Carcassonne.

A massive search was organized by firefighters, police and gendarmes. So far 12 kangaroos have been found. Five of them had remained within the park.

There is a concern that the marsupials will make their way onto a freeway, and become a risk to themselves or drivers.

In October of 2008, in the same park, hunting dogs managed to get loose. They later attacked and killed 44 of the park’s kangaroos.



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January 19, 2009

Seven dead, one missing, two survive French helicopter crash off Gabon coast

Seven dead, one missing, two survive French helicopter crash off Gabon coast

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Monday, January 19, 2009

The FoudreLe TCD Foudre à quai à l’arsenal de Toulon (avril 2002).

Officials say that a French military helicopter with 10 French soldiers, including four crew members and six Special Forces paratroopers, has crashed off the coast of Gabon in west central Africa.

The Eurocopter AS 532 Cougar ditched shortly into the Atlantic Ocean after leaving a French naval ship, about 50 kilometres off the coast. Seven French soldiers were killed, two were rescued, and one is still missing, according to a statement issued by President Nicolas Sarkozy’s office.

“Today, the wreckage of the helicopter was located at a depth of 35 metres and searched. Unfortunately, we must report the deaths of five other soldiers. A final soldier remains missing. Searches are continuing,” the statement explained.

According to Libreville Lieutenant Colonel Pascal Carpentier, the ill-fated helicopter crashed Saturday night at 8:08 p.m. (1908 GMT) into Atlantic waters off Nyonie, a small town located between Gabon’s capital Libreville and the town of Port-Gentil. It was taking off from the amphibious assault ship La Foudre‘s naval landing craft transporter cruising 50 kilometers (30 miles) off the Gabonese coast, during a joint training exercise, said Lieutenant Colonel Francois-Marie Gougeon, spokesman for the general staff.

A French army Eurocopter AS 532 Cougar helicopter from the landing zone at the Kabul Military Training Center in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 15, 2007.

The ship “set off the alert and arrived at the crash site with rescuers who picked up the injured crew within half an hour. The sea was calm and the wind low at the time of the crash but the night was very dark,” Lieutenant Gougeon explained, adding that “search operations will naturally continue all night.” La Foudre, two helicopters and oil giant Total S.A.‘s three vessels, including its sonar and underwater robot joined the rescue effort of the salvage team.

“Divers were deployed to locate the wreckage,” said Captain Christophe Prazuck, spokesman for the army general staff. “At daybreak we will deploy all our means, planes, helicopters, boats… to take part in the search,” said Gabon’s Interior Minister André Mba Obame.

Meanwhile French President Nicolas Sarkozy directed Defence Minister Hervé Morin to travel to the crash site. Sarkozy had “asked that all available means in the area be immediately deployed to find the soldiers who were aboard.” Morin later announced there would be two probes, a judicial one and another by the French defence ministry, with the assistance of French gendarmes and an air accident expert.

Satellite image of Gabon, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library.

Minister Morin arrived in Libreville on Sunday and met with President Omar Bongo to discuss rescue efforts for the missing body of one of the seven soldiers. “The cause of this tragedy remains unknown. It may be natural or human, or a combination of both.” Morin said. “Divers were inspecting the Cougar, which was in water 35 meters (about 115 feet) deep. We will do everything we can to find the last person missing,” he added.

Morin viewed rescue efforts on La Foudre, and visited friends and relatives of the missing at Camp DeGaulle. The French soldiers were “permanent personnel in Gabon who knew the region well,” said General Claude Reglat, Gabon commander of French forces. “The six others were commandos who had arrived from the French army’s elite 13th Regiment of Dragon Paratroopers. We have expressed our compassion and solidarity to the families,” he added. “This type of helicopter does not have a black box. So the flight was not recorded, nor were the voices in the cockpit. So some elements will remain unknown,” Claude Reglat also noted.

The January 17-21 bilateral manoeuvres called ‘Operation N’Gari’ involved 600 French soldiers and 120 Gabonese troops maneuvering in the military drill known as Baptise Ngeri. The soldiers were backed by Cougar and Fennec helicopters to coordinate maritime safety operations with UN peacekeepers at Bouna airport, in the Ivory Coast. In the joint exercise soldiers were to be parachuted onto predetermined targets including Nyonie.

Gabon, a former French colony, hosts one of four permanent French bases in Africa. Gabon is a country in west central Africa sharing borders with the Gulf of Guinea to the west, Equatorial Guinea to the northwest, and Cameroon to the north, with the Republic of the Congo curving around the east and south. According the FFG which has around 1,000 troops in Gabon, the French Forces in Gabon (FFG)’s role is “to assure the safety of the 12,000 French residents in the country in case of threat, and carry out aid missions.”



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July 8, 2007

Tour de France: The race begins in earnest

Tour de France: The race begins in earnest

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Sunday, July 8, 2007

London, England — For the second time in two days, the sun and the crowds came out to welcome the Tour de France to London.

The all clapping, all cheering public lined the streets to watch David Millar take the lead from Greenwich, only to lose his steam 50km to the end. The winner, Australian Robbie McEwan, claimed the Green jersey while Fabian Cancellara held onto the leaders yellow jersey.

Fellow Briton Mark Cavendish suffered bike troubles throughout the whole stage. Millar did not go without, he was awarded the polka dot jersey for king of the mountains.

Overall standing:

  1. Fabian Cancellara in 4 hours 47 minutes and 51 seconds
  2. Andreas Kloden at 13 secs
  3. David Millar at 21 secs
  4. George Hincapie at 23 secs
  5. Bradley Wiggins at 23 secs
  6. Vladimir Gusev at 25 secs
  7. Vladimir Karpets at 26 secs
  8. Thor Hushovd at 29 secs
  9. Alexander Vinokourov at 30 secs
  10. Thomas Dekker at 31 secs

Atmosphere at Jubilee Gardens

Tour de France 2007. The procession passes through the streets of London.

The show got underway as the caravane set off from the Mall at half eight. Dance beats, giant cows, and French tinged words of encouragement, momentarily woke the early birds from their patient wait for the main event. As they waited curious by-passers swapped photography tips, and thoughts on cycling as the youngest members wondered what the fuss was all about. Council workmen commented on how easy it was to get work done, with no car traffic on the roads.

Again the policing was low key and friendly with the Gendarme Nationale cutting a dash amongst their British colleagues. British bobbies rode in French vehicles, and French argents in British ones. Riding well in advance of the Tour, French and British motorcycle policemen swapped tips and compared notes as they passed. The Frenchmen bringing more than a little Gallic charm and swagger to the proceedings.

The crowd behind Jubilee Gardens grew as the start time of twenty-five past ten approached, an event presaged by an ever increasing number of press and support vehicles. As Big Ben chimed the hour in the background a quartet of helicopters in the sky above the River Thames began to jostle for position; a dance mirrored on the ground as anticipation grew. Slowly the dribble that was the vanguard of press and support vehicles became a torrent. A wave of cheers rung out, announcing finally the arrival of the riders. Despite their being almost 190 riders the speeding cyclists had come and gone in a matter of minutes, however the show was not yet over. For a quarter of an hour afterwards tour buses, and still yet more support vehicles followed in the wake of the cyclists. As the police began to remove their restrictions on the crowds and traffic, a final rear guard of race fans emulating their heroes brought up the rear. Despite some not being in the best of condition and some riding rather rickety bikes, these fans still managed to get an enthusiastic cheer of encouragement from the remaining onlookers.

With the Tour continuing on its way and it still not yet 11, some amongst the myriad of spectators began to make their way to the large outside video screens to continue watching the race, others preferring to sample the shops, sights, smells and tastes of the waking City. With some others choosing to sit in the sun, and lie in the park, no doubt making up for an early start.

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July 7, 2007

Tour de France: Cancellara wins 7.9 km time trial prologue

Tour de France: Cancellara wins 7.9 km time trial prologue

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Saturday, July 7, 2007

Tour de France 2007
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Other Tour de France 2007 stories
  • 29 July 2007: Tour de France: Alberto Contador wins the grand tour
  • 28 July 2007: Tour de France: Levi Leipheimer wins stage 19
  • 27 July 2007: Tour de France: Sandy Casar wins stage 18
  • 26 July 2007: Tour de France: Daniele Bennati wins stage 17
  • 25 July 2007: Tour de France: Yellow jersey Rasmussen withdrawn
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  • Stage 11 to Stage 20

At least half a million onlookers turned out to line the route as the Tour de France Prologue closed the streets of Central London for a day. Setting off at one minute intervals the 180 plus riders took less than ten minutes to speed past some of London’s most memorable landmarks. With the eventual winner World time-trial champion Fabian Cancellara completing the 7.9 kilometre individual time trial in 8 minutes 50 seconds.

Fabian Cancellara

The Tour had to compete with more familiar sporting events, the British Grand Prix, the closing stages of Wimbledon and with the Live Earth concerts for the heart’s of the British public. However some say as many as a million turned out for the Gallic extravaganza; the party atmosphere aided by a turn in the weather, the sun coming out for the first time all summer.

Run on the second anniversary of the 2005 terrorist attacks and at a time of heightened security, policing was successfully discrete the most visible police presence, by way of their novelty being, 45 members of the Gendarme Nationale.

Coming to England for the first time since 1994 fans new and old had the course of the day and the three hours of the trials to familiarise themselves with the French institution. The initial good natured cheering on of every rider, growing into real excitement as the shape of the race emerged. At the end of the day the standings were:

Rank Name Country Team Time
1 Fabian Cancellara Switzerland Team CSC 8’50”
2 Andréas Klöden Germany Astana Team 13″
3 George Hincapie USA Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team 23″
4 Bradley Wiggins Great Britain Cofidis 23″
5 Vladimir Gusev Russia Discovery Channel Pro Cycling Team 25″
6 Vladimir Karpets Russia Caisse d’Epargne 26″
7 Alexandre Vinokourov Kazakhstan Astana Team 30″
8 Thomas Dekker Netherlands Rabobank 31″
9 Manuel Quinziato Italy Liquigas 32″
10 Benoît Vaugrenard France Française des Jeux 32″

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December 31, 2006

French agency CNES to release UFO archives on the Internet

Filed under: Archived,Europe,France,Gendarmerie (France),Space,UFO,Wackynews — admin @ 5:00 am

French agency CNES to release UFO archives on the Internet

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Sunday, December 31, 2006

The French Space Agency will publish its UFO archive online by late January or mid-February. Most of the 6,000 reports have been filed by the public and airline professionals. Jacques Arnould, an official for the French Space Agency, said that the data had accumulated over a 30 year period and that they were often reported to the Gendarmerie.

Often they are made to the Gendarmerie, which provides an official witness statement … and some come from airline pilots – Jacques Arnould

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March 18, 2006

Minority mars Paris CPE protest

Minority mars Paris CPE protest – Wikinews, the free news source

Minority mars Paris CPE protest

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Saturday, March 18, 2006

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Car on fire near Place de la Nation

(This is a translation of the French Wikinews article: [1] Manifestation contre le CPE à Paris)

Demonstration

A demonstration was planned for two p.m. [local time and UTC, Saturday, March 18], departing from the Place Denfert-Rochereau in Paris. Everyone had set out by three p.m., the crowd being compact.

Retired people, post-highschool students, highschool students and employees all gathered to protest against the government’s

The crowd of demonstrators

bill establishing the “Contrat Première Embauche,” — First Employment Contract.

A security service provided by the unions maintained order more or less well. Even so, an impressive body of very visible police sought to prevent any excess.

The first demonstrators arrived about five p.m. at the Place de la Nation, in a festive atmosphere.

Police (CRS) preceding the procession

In the procession were musicians, grimy youths and colorful banners. Along the edges of the procession and at the Place de la Nation could even be seen sellers of sandwiches and drinks.

Excesses

Demonstrators on the statue of the Place de la Nation

Toward six p.m., some hooded youths began to confront the forces of order massed at the edges of the Place de la Nation. They threw bottles and pyrotechnical devices and burned a car. The confrontation, which lasted at least until eight p.m., produced one serious injury — a SUD-PTT union member, who it seems was struck by members of the CRS security force.

Broken window at the Place de la Nation

Some demonstrators at first sought to place themselves between the ruffians and the police, but they had to give it up, faced with the barrage of bottles.

After the automobile fire, around seven p.m., the mobile gendarmes charged, in order to establish a security perimeter around the vehicle on fire, to permit the firemen to extinguish it. In view of the small distance that separated the “forces of order” from the brigands when they burned the car, one can ask why the mobile gendarmes did not try to prevent this act of gratuitous vandalism.

Hooligans throw bottles at the police

The police charged several times and threw tear gas. By eight p.m., the confrontations still continued, and a mobile gendarme said that the objective was to make the demonstrators leave the Place de la Nation. A strange impression is felt when this sort of occurrence breaks out in a demonstration that was until then well-mannered. It is like thunder from a blue sky.

The mobile gendarmes

The crowd suddenly opened, and the hooligans were there, ready to come unglued, the crowd of demonstrators transforming themselves into rubberneckers around the protagonists of the confrontation.

Once again, a few provocateurs, undoubtedly fewer than about thirty, caused a movement of several tens of thousands of people to get out of hand.

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February 11, 2006

French satirical weekly reprints caricatures

French satirical weekly reprints caricatures

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Saturday, February 11, 2006

Two vans of riot control gendarmes mobiles were positioned in case of disruption.

Paris, France- The French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo reprinted in its Wednesday February 8, 2006, issue the cartoons originally printed in Jyllands-Posten, representing caricatures of the Muslim prophet Muhammad. Charlie Hebdo is known for its ferocious critical tone and general hostility towards organized religion.

Charlie Hebdo normally prints 140,000 copies; 160,000 were printed of these issues, but were sold out before midday. The paper announced an exceptional re-issue of 160,000 the next day. According to Le Figaro, the final printout could exceed 400,000.

Some French Muslim associations had tried to obtain an injunction against the publishing of the paper, claiming that the cartoons incited to racial and religious hatred, but the court rejected their request on procedural grounds, as recommended by the public prosecutor. The judge, Jean-Claude Magendie, remarked that the 1881 law on the Press is very formal in order to protect the rights of defense with respect to freedom of speech.

No protesters were seen at mid-day.

The French government had law enforcement officers, many equipped for riot control, guard the outside of the parisian offices of the paper, should some protesters try to disrupt public order. However, at mid-day, no protesters could be seen. Charlie Hebdo is normally highly critical of police action and extraordinary security measures.

Another French satirical weekly, Le Canard enchaîné did not publish the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons because they were, according to it, “not very fun and not very original”, but published series of cartoons mocking Islamists (those exploiting the Muslim faith for political purposes). The Canard called them “Satanic drawings”, in a probable allusion to The Satanic Verses, a novel whose author was sentenced to death by Islamists.

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  • “700,000 march in Beirut; Hezbollah leader lambasts Bush and Rice” — Wikinews, February 9, 2006
  • “Jyllands-Posten reconsiders printing holocaust denial cartoons” — Wikinews, February 8, 2006
  • “Hamshahri newspaper plans cartoon response” — Wikinews, February 7, 2006
  • “Tensions continue to rise in Middle East over “Mohammad Cartoons”” — Wikinews, February 2, 2006

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November 17, 2005

French parliament extends state of emergency to three months

French parliament extends state of emergency to three months

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Thursday, November 17, 2005

The French Parliament passed a law extending the state of emergency decreed on November 8 by president Jacques Chirac for a duration of 3 months, the executive being authorized to terminate this period earlier if necessary. The November 8 decision, based on a 1955 statute, could last for a maximum of 12 days only, after which Parliament had to vote on an extension.

The state of emergency allows local authorities (prefects) to prohibit public meetings and regulate movements of persons, including curfews. In addition, in certain zones specified by the executive, where riots have recently taken place, local authorities may close meeting halls or bars; detain firearms; and authorize searches inside habitations during the day or the night by administrative order (normally, searches during formal criminal investigations have to be authorized by a judge). The government said that it will not use the power to regulate the media, and that searches will be subject to supervision by the judiciary.

The law was defended by Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy, in charge of law enforcement. Sarkozy spoke before the French National Assembly (which approved the text on November 15) and the French Senate (which approved it on November 16); he defended the actions of the government and explained why, in his opinion, the law had to be voted. Sarkozy is also the head of the UMP party, which holds a majority in both houses, and there was no doubt that the text would be approved.

Sarkozy added that in the forthcoming months, CRS (riot division of the Police) and Gendarmerie mobile forces would operate daily in difficult suburbs as a “proximity police”. He contended that the “proximity police” established by preceding left-wing government was too much concerned with social activities and not enough about arresting criminals. Sarkozy has also contended that some of the riots were orchestrated by drug traffickers, gangsters and other criminals in order to secure lawless zones.

The French Socialist Party opposed the law, claiming it was excessive. Some left-wing members of parliament contended that using a law passed in 1955 to help quashing Algerian independence movements against children of Algerian immigrants was somewhat insensitive and unsuccessfully proposed an amendment to repeal the 1955 law. On the other hand, right-wing anti-immigrant politician Philippe de Villiers has contended that the government was far too soft and called for the use of military force. Jean-Marie Le Pen, a longtime opponent of immigration from poor, Muslim countries, pointed out that the events vindicated what he had long said.

Members of Sarkozy’s UMP party blamed the de facto polygamy of some African immigrants for the failure of their families to raise and educate children properly. They suggested a more restrictive approach to immigration.

Nicolas Sarkozy is a probable contender for the 2007 presidential election. According to polls, his approval rate jumped by +11 to 63% during the events; he leads the approval opinions for presidential candidates.

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September 28, 2005

French ferry raided by military forces

French ferry raided by military forces – Wikinews, the free news source

French ferry raided by military forces

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Wednesday, September 28, 2005

French military commandos boarded a ferry boat on Wednesday morning that had been taken over by ferry company strikers from the Société nationale Corse-Méditerranée (SNCM). The strike erupted after the French government announced its intention to privatize the company, which had been losing money for decades. The strikers seem to belong to the Corsican workers’ union, a trade union close to Corsican nationalists.

The strikers captured the ship, called Pascal-Paoli, in Marseille. They sailed her to Bastia where she was intercepted by a ship of the Marine Nationale and boarded by special forces. The military team included members of the GIGN (the French Gendarmerie’s rescue and anti-terror unit) and, according to some sources, naval special forces.

The prosecutor’s office at Marseille has opened a criminal enquiry for “evident crime”, with the charge of piracy — a crime which, according to article L224-6 of the French Penal Code, is punished by a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. If the charges are retained, the initiators of the event will face a jury trial before an assize court. There are, however, questions as to whether this criminal qualification applies in this case, since the strikers did not resort to violence in stealing the ship.

The strikers are in protest against the French government’s intention to sell SNCM to the investment fund Butler Capital Partners, led by businessman Walter Butler. Mr Butler claims that he can put SNCM back into financial shape within 4 years. Opponents of the privatization plan contend that the sale price is an amount greatly inferior to what it is worth, even if only for its assets.

The French government has had significant problems with money-losing state-owned companies in the past. SNCM is, however, a special case, due to the delicate political situation in Corsica. By comparison, the private company Corsica Ferries is in good financial shape. Some sympathetic protesters, however, caused damage to Corsica Ferries offices.

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June 2, 2005

France: Villepin\’s cabinet announced

France: Villepin’s cabinet announced – Wikinews, the free news source

France: Villepin’s cabinet announced

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Thursday, June 2, 2005

Newly named Prime Minister of France Dominique de Villepin has had his cabinet accepted by President of the Republic Jacques Chirac.

Head of the majority Union for a Popular Movement (UMP) party, Nicolas Sarkozy, comes as a second-in-command as Minister of the Interior, with the honorific rank of Minister of State. The Ministry of the Interior is traditionally one of the most important positions in the cabinet, with that of Finances; the Minister of the Interior is in charge, notably, of law enforcement and relationships with local governments. There is some uneasiness in having the head of a party in a position that is partly in charge of electoral redistrictings. Also, this arrangement creates a peculiar situation: it is public knowledge that Villepin and Sarkozy consider each other a dangerous political rival with respect to the 2007 presidential election, and they are widely said to loathe each other.

The cabinet was presented as a “restricted” cabinet. However, as many as 31 ministers, delegate ministers and secretaries of state were named; still, this is a reduction from the preceding 43. While the cabinet is for a large part copied from the preceding one, some ministers who had provoked controversy and animosity were removed or moved to another less risky position. François Fillon, formerly Minister of National Education, whose plan for reforming public education was lambasted by members of his own party, including president of the National Assembly Jean-Louis Debré, was ruled partly unconstitutional by the Constitutional Council, and provoked widespread student protests and unrest in high schools, is no longer a minister. Dominique Perben, who pushed for controversial law which opponents allege curtail fundamental constitutional freedoms while Minister of Justice, was moved to the less sensitive position of Minister of Transportation and Equipment. It is also possible that the movement of Brigitte Girardin from Minister for the Oversea (relationships with French overseas departments and territories) to (international) Cooperation was motivated by the crisis that occurred in French Polynesia between Gaston Flosse and his opponent Oscar Temaru.

While the Union for French Democracy (UDF) party, led by François Bayrou, formally remains in the ruling coalition along with the UMP, it has decided that, because the new government would probably do more of the same policies, it would not participate in it. The only member of the government from UDF is Gilles de Robien, as in the preceding government.

Previous head of government Jean-Pierre Raffarin had lost the confidence of the French, with polls putting him as low as 22% confidence. President Chirac’s confidence among the citizenry is also a record low of 24%.

Composition of the government

Mr Dominique de Villepin is Prime Minister.

Ministers

  1. Mr Nicolas Sarkozy — Minister of State, Minister of the Interior and of the management of the Territory (law enforcement, French National Police, French Gendarmerie; relationships with local governments; safety regulations; territory subdivisions)
  2. Mrs Michèle Alliot-Marie — w:Minister of Defense (France)
  3. Mr Philippe Douste-Blazy, Minister of Foreign Affairs
  4. M. Jean-Louis Borloo, Minister of employment, social cohesion and housing
  5. M. Thierry Breton, Minister of Economy, Finances and Industry
  6. M. Gilles de Robien, Minister of National Education, of Higher Education and Research;
  7. M. Pascal Clément, Keeper of the Seals, Minister of Justice;
  8. M. Dominique Perben, Minister of Transportation, Equipment, Tourism and the Sea (national roads, help to local governments for transportation, some government constructions)
  9. M. Xavier Bertrand, Minister of Health and Solidarities;
  10. M. Dominique Bussereau, Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries;
  11. M. Christian Jacob, Minister of the Civil Service|;
  12. M. Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres, Minister of Culture and Communications; (museums, cultural activities, supervision of broadcasting)
  13. Mrs Nelly Olin, Minister of Ecology and sustainable development;
  14. M. François Baroin, Minister for the Oversea;
  15. M. Renaud Dutreil, Minister for small and middle businesses, Commerce, artisans, and self-employed professionals
  16. M. Jean-François Lamour, Minister of Youth, Sports and associative life.

Delegate ministers

Delegate ministers operate as subordinates of ministers.

  1. Mr Henri Cuq, delegate minister for relationships with Parliament;
  2. Mr Azouz Begag, delegate minister for the promotion of the equality of chances;
  3. Mr Jean-François Copé, delegate minister for budget and the reform of the State, spokesman of the Government;
  4. M. Gérard Larcher, delegate minister for employment, work, and the professional insertion of the young;
  5. Mrs Catherine Vautrin, delegate minister for social cohesion and parity [of the sexes];
  6. Mrs Brigitte Girardin, delegate minister for [international] cooperation, development and francophonie;
  7. Mr Brice Hortefeux, delegate minister for local governments;
  8. Mrs Catherine Colonna, delegate minister for European affairs (relationships with the European Union and other members thereof);
  9. Mr François Goulard, delegate minister for higher education and research;
  10. Mr Léon Bertrand, delegate minister for tourism;
  11. Mr Philippe Bas, delegate minister for Social Security, the elderly, the handicapped, and family;
  12. Mr François Loos, delegate minister for industry;
  13. Mrs Christine Lagarde, delegate minister for foreign commerce;
  14. Mr Hamlaoui Mékachéra, delegate minister for war veterans;
  15. M. Christian Estrosi, delegate minister for the management of the territory.

Related news

  • “France gets a new prime minister” — Wikinews, May 31, 2005

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