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January 11, 2010

French Guiana and Martinique reject referendum for increased autonomy

French Guiana and Martinique reject referendum for increased autonomy

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Monday, January 11, 2010

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Voters in French Guiana and Martinique voted down referendums for increased autonomy from France earlier today, according to poll results.

In French Guiana, with a turnout of 48%, the vote was 69.8% against increased independence from France; in Martinique, with a 55% voter turnout, the polls were 80% against extra autonomy.

In a statement, French President Nicolas Sarkozy hailed the outcome, saying it reflected the strong ties between the territories and metropolitan France. Both Martinique, in the Caribbean, and French Guiana were granted French department status when France relinquished total control more than half a century ago.

Supporters of greater autonomy, however, have argued that it would allow the territories greater say in key issues like development, education and employment.



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August 18, 2007

Hurricane Dean forecasted to become \”catastrophic\” Category 5 storm

Hurricane Dean forecasted to become “catastrophic” Category 5 storm

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Saturday, August 18, 2007

Hurricane Dean forecast update at 8 a.m. (EDT) update on August 18, 2007, courtesy of NOAA.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami is calling Hurricane Dean “extremely dangerous,” saying that the storm is gaining strength and will likely become a Category 5 storm. The storm’s winds are currently clocked at 150 mph, classifying it as a Category 4 hurricane. A Category 5 hurricane means the storm has winds of over 155 mph and has the potential to cause “catastrophic” damage.

Dean is currently moving through the eastern Caribbean, and is heading towards the Dominican Republic and Haiti. The storm is expected to hit Jamaica on Sunday, and then gain even more power as it strikes Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula on Monday.

Dean could hit the mainland of the United States on Wednesday. Therefore, officials in Texas and Louisiana are currently making major preparations.

Rick Perry, the Governor of Texas, said the hurricane is an “imminent threat,” saying the state is preparing for its arrival. Task forces have been put on alert, and supply trucks and other resources are in position.

Governor Kathleen Blanco of Louisiana declared a state of emergency yesterday so local governments can move forward with emergency plans if necessary. However, forecasters say there is little chance of Dean moving toward Louisiana. Instead, the storm is expected to threaten Mexico or Texas.

A hurricane watch has been issued for Haiti from the Haiti/Dominican Republic border to Port-au-Prince. Jamaica has opened all shelters and Cuba has declared a “state of alert” in preparation for the storm.

A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the U.S. and Spanish Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

At 5 a.m. EDT, the center of Hurricane Dean was about 240 miles south-southwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and 660 miles east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica, and was moving west at 14 mph. However, the storm is expected to pick up speed today.

Hurricane Dean could force NASA to cut short Endeavour’s flight. Mission management team chairman Leroy Cain said, “We’d really like to protect an option to be able to end the mission on Tuesday.”

The Associated Press reports several deaths and significant damage on the islands of St. Lucia, Dominica and Martinique.

Related news

  • “Hurricane Dean now a Category 4 storm” — Wikinews, August 17, 2007

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August 16, 2007

Hurricane Dean is upgraded to a Category 2 storm

Hurricane Dean is upgraded to a Category 2 storm

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Thursday, August 16, 2007

Hurricane Dean as reported by NOAA

According to the National Hurricane Center, Hurricane Dean is now a Category 2 hurricane. The Atlantic’s first hurricane of the season had top sustained winds at 100 mph at 5 p.m. EDT. Dean’s winds were measured at 75 mph earlier in the day.

A meteorologist from the National Hurricane Center warns, “Dean is likely to become a major hurricane in the eastern Caribbean Sea.” Adding that one forecast shows it could become “an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane by the time it reaches the northwestern Caribbean Sea.”

Forecasters claim the storm could threaten the Lesser Antilles by Friday. Dean is then forecast to pass over Jamaica by 2 p.m. EDT Sunday, and then move across the Yucatan Peninsula and enter the Gulf of Mexico by Tuesday.

Hurricane warnings have been issues for the islands of St. Lucia and Dominica. The Barbados weather service has issued a tropical storm warning for the island of Barbados and a tropical storm watch for St. Vincent and St. Maarten.

Katherine Cesinger, a spokeswoman for Texas Governor Rick Perry said, “It’s so far out, but it’s not too early to start preparing…We have more notice than with Erin. We’re glad for that especially since [Dean] is projected to bring some strength.”

At 2 p.m. EDT, the storm was about 210 miles due east of Barbados and about 305 miles east of Martinique, according to the National Hurricane Center. It is moving west at 23 mph.

Hurricane Dean was officially named early this morning.

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July 14, 2005

Hurricane Emily hits Grenada

Hurricane Emily hits Grenada – Wikinews, the free news source

Hurricane Emily hits Grenada

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Thursday, July 14, 2005

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Hurricane Emily has hit the small eastern Caribbean island of Grenada. The hurricane, which has been upgraded to Category 2 status, hit the island early this morning and has caused widespread damage. It has been reported that many buildings have lost their roofs and there has been much flooding.

The storm affected the northern parishes of St. Patrick’s and St. Andrew’s the worst and also caused considerable damage to the nearby islands of Carriacou and Petite Martinique. No fatalities have yet been reported. Earlier this year Hurricane Dennis hit Cuba and Haiti, leaving 41 people dead.

The damage after Hurricane Ivan in 2004

Last year Hurricane Ivan devastated the island and resulted in the deaths of 39 people.

Emily is the fifth tropical storm to develop this hurricane season. It was the earliest time on record that five named storms had formed in the Atlantic. Emily, along with Dennis, reached hurricane status. Arlene, Bret and Cindy remained tropical storms.

Hurricane Emily regional imagery, July 14, 2005 at 1915 UTC.

The British Royal Navy, which usually deploys two ships to the Caribbean, has placed the destroyer HMS Liverpool and the tanker RFA Wave Knight on standby. During Hurricane Frances and Ivan last year, HMS Richmond and RFA Wave Ruler were actively involved in humanitarian relief. Prime Minister Keith Mitchell of Grenada had effectively run his country for seven hours from Richmond after his home had been destroyed.

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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