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July 3, 2014

Indian space agency launches five foreign satellites

Indian space agency launches five foreign satellites

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Thursday, July 3, 2014

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The Indian space agency, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), launched five foreign satellites from the Sriharikota facility on Monday morning, using the PSLV-C23 launch vehicle.

The primary payload was an earth observation satellite from France called SPOT 7 which weighed 714 kg. Other satellites included on board were the German AISat, 14 kg; Canadian NLS7.1 (CAN-X4) and NLS7.2 (CAN-X5), 15 kg each; and Singaporean VELOX 1, 7 kg.

The launch took place at 9:52 AM on Monday morning, delayed from the original schedule by three minutes to avoid space debris. This was the 26th successful launch of a PSLV. Along with the US, Russia, the European Union, China, and Japan, India is one of the few nations that offer commercial launch services. These services are provided by Antrix, the commercial department of ISRO. ISRO’s next major launch may be this month using a GSLV-III launch vehicle.

The Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi was present at the launch site. He addressed the scientists after the launch congratulating them, and asked them to build a satellite suitable for use by all the nations of the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC). He also emphasized the frugal approach of India to the space industry. Phillipe Ghesquiers of Airbus Space and Defense Systems, the builders of SPOT 7, expressed satisfaction at the launch and stated they may use India’s launch services again in the future.



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October 22, 2008

India\’s First Lunar Mission Launched

India’s first lunar mission launched – Wikinews, the free news source

India’s first lunar mission launched

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Wednesday, October 22, 2008

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India’s first unmanned lunar mission was launched off of the shore of Andhra Pradesh this morning. India now joins the United States, Russia, Japan, China and the European Space Agency as the only powers that have demonstrated their ability to launch satellites to the moon.

The Chandrayaan-1 lunar probe was launched from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre at 6:22 am (00:52 UTC) in Sriharikota, which is about 88 km (55 mi) north of the southern Indian city of Chennai. The cost of this mission is estimated at 3.4 billion rupees (US$78 million). While the launch has been criticized for being a waste of Indian government funds, when the money can go towards more humanitarian causes, India is hopeful that its venture will put it into competition for commercial satellite launch services. The satellite features five components built by India’s technology sector, and six components from foreign nations.

The Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) C-11 is the rocket which will carry the Chandryaan-1 satellite probe. The probe is being sent on a two-year orbital mission around the moon for achieving substantial goals for a detailed map of the mineral resources, chemical and topographical characteristics of the moon’s surface. Some of the mission will include examining the surface for sources of water, and taking comparison photos of the light side and dark sides of the surface.

Both China and Japan already have satellites of their own orbiting the moon, and just last month China became the third country in the world to carry out its own independent space walks. India’s previous space endeavors have mainly been related to launching weather and communications satellites.

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  • “NASA mission to map the boundary of solar system” — Wikinews, October 19, 2008

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April 28, 2008

PSLV rocket launches ten satellites

PSLV rocket launches ten satellites – Wikinews, the free news source

PSLV rocket launches ten satellites

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Monday, April 28, 2008

File:Pslv-pad.jpg

An earlier PSLV on its launch pad
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

An Indian Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) has successfully launched ten satellites. The 44-metre long rocket lifted off from the second launch pad at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre at 03:53:51 GMT (09:24 local time), and reached a polar, Sun-synchronous low Earth orbit a little over seven minutes later. Following burnout of the fourth stage of the carrier rocket, the payloads were released. The PSLV flew in the CA, or Core Alone, configuration, with no solid rocket boosters around the first stage.

The ten satellites aboard the rocket will be used for several purposes by a variety of organisations. The primary payload, Cartosat-2A, is a remote sensing satellite, which will be operated by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). IMS-1, also known as TWSAT, another ISRO remote sensing satellite, was the secondary payload. In addition, eight commercial payloads were flown, as part of the Nanosat Launch Service-4 and 5 programmes. There satellites were Cute 1.7+APD-2 and SEEDS-2 for the University of Tokyo, Japan, CanX-2 and CanX-6 for the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Canada, Delfi-C3 for the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, AAUSAT-II for the University of Aalborg, Denmark, COMPASS-1 for Aachen University, Germany, and RUBIN-8 for German aerospace company OHB System.

This is the 21st orbital launch of 2008, and the second to be conducted by a PSLV. It is the 13th total PSLV launch. The next PSLV launch is scheduled for either July or December, with the Chandrayaan-I spacecraft, India’s first Lunar probe.



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